Tag Archives: Inner Mongolia

Allium ramosum

Botanical Name: Allium ramosum
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Subfamily: Allioideae
Tribe: Allieae
Genus: Allium
Species: A. ramosum
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asparagales

Synonyms: A. odoratum. pro parte. A. odorum.

Common Names: Fragrant-flowered Garlic, Chinese chives

Habitat : Allium ramosum is native to Kazakhstan, Mongolia, Siberia, the Russian Far East, and northern China (Gansu, Hebei, Heilongjiang, Jilin, Liaoning, Inner Mongolia, Ningxia, Qinghai, Shaanxi, Shandong, Shanxi, Xinjiang). The species is also naturalized in a few places in eastern Europe. In its native range, it grows at elevations of 500–2100 m. It grows on meadows and grassy slopes. Sunny hills and pastures at elevations of 500 – 2100 metres in northern China.

Description:
Allium ramosum is a bulb growing to 0.5 m (1ft 8in). Leaves are linear, keeled, shorter than the scape. Umbels have many flowers crowded together. Tepals are white or pale red with a red midvein.

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It is not frost tender. It is in flower from Jul to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, insects.Suitable for: light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers dry or moist soil.

Cultivation:
An easily grown plant, it prefers a sunny position in a light well-drained soil. The bulbs should be planted fairly deeply.  A very ornamental plant, the flowers are especially attractive. Very closely related to A. tuberosum. Grows well with most plants, especially roses, carrots, beet and chamomile, but it inhibits the growth of legumes. This plant is a bad companion for alfalfa, each species negatively affecting the other. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.
Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle – if you want to produce clumps more quickly then put three plants in each pot. Grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter and plant them out into their permanent positions in spring once they are growing vigorously and are large enough. Division in spring. Very easy, the plants divide successfully at any time in the growing season and the divisions can be planted straight out into their permanent positions if required.

Edible Uses:

Bulb – raw or cooked. The small bulbs are about 10mm in diameter. Leaves – raw or cooked. The flavour is somewhat between that of garlic and chives. An excellent taste, the leaves have a pleasant sweetness mixed with a strong onion flavour. Flowers – raw. Used as a garnish on salads.

Medicinal Uses:
The leaves and bulbs contain sulphur compounds (which give them their onion flavour), saponins and bitter substances. They possess antibacterial properties and are used in Vietnam in the treatment of haemoptysis, epistaxis, cough, sore throat, asthma, dysentery, dyspepsia etc. When added to the diet on a regular basis they help reduce blood cholesterol levels, act as a tonic to the digestive system and also tonify the circulatory system. The seed contains alkaloids and saponins. It is used in the treatment of spermatorrhoea, haematuria, incontinence, lumbago etc.
Other Uses:
Repellent.

The juice of the plant is used as a moth repellent. The whole plant is said to repel insects and moles.

Known Hazards:  Although no individual reports regarding this species have been seen, there have been cases of poisoning caused by the consumption, in large quantities and by some mammals, of certain members of this genus. Dogs seem to be particularly susceptible.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.
Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allium_ramosum
http://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Allium+ramosum

Allium ledebourianum

Botanival Name : Allium ledebourianum
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Subfamily: Allioideae
Tribe: Allieae
Genus: Allium
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asparagales
Species: A. ledebourianum

Synonyms: A. uliginosum. Ldb. A. schoenoprasum foliosum.

Common Names: Giant Garlic Chives

Habitat : Allium ledebourianum is native to central and northeastern Asia: Kazakhstan, Mongolia, Russia (Altay Krai, Khabarovsk, Primorye, Sakhalin), and China (Heilongjiang, Jilin, Liaoning, Inner Mongolia, Xinjiang). It occurs in meadows and river valleys in Siberia, Mountains, moist meadows, river banks, gravelly and sandy places at elevations of 100 – 1800 metres in northern China.

Description:
Allium ledebourianum is a bulb growing to 0.6 m (2ft). It has has a cluster of narrow bulbs up to 20 mm across. Scapes are up to 100 cm tall. Leaves are tubular, shorter than the scape. Umbel is hemispheric, densely crowded with many purple flowers; tepals pale purple with darker purple midvein. It is in flower from Jul to August.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES 

The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, insects.Suitable for: light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers moist soil.

Cultivation:
Prefers a sunny position in a light well-drained soil. The bulbs should be planted fairly deeply. Cultivated for its edible leaves and bulb in Japan. This species is probably no more than a synonym for A schoenoprasum. Grows well with most plants, especially roses, carrots, beet and chamomile, but it inhibits the growth of legumes. This plant is a bad companion for alfalfa, each species negatively affecting the other. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.
Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle – if you want to produce clumps more quickly then put three plants in each pot. Grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter and plant them out into their permanent positions in spring once they are growing vigorously and are large enough. Division in spring or after the plant dies down in late summer. Very easy, the plants divide successfully at any time in the growing season and the divisions can be planted straight out into their permanent positions if required.

Edible Uses:
Bulb – raw or cooked. The small bulbs are formed in clusters on the rhizome and are about 10mm in diameter. Leaves – raw or cooked. The leaves are added to salads or used as a flavouring in soups etc. The flavour resembles wild onions and chives with a hint of garlic. Flowers – raw. Used as a garnish on salads.
Medicinal Uses:
Although no specific mention of medicinal uses has been seen for this species, members of this genus are in general very healthy additions to the diet. They contain sulphur compounds (which give them their onion flavour) and when added to the diet on a regular basis they help reduce blood cholesterol levels, act as a tonic to the digestive system and also tonify the circulatory system.
Other Uses: The juice of the plant is used as a moth repellent. The whole plant is said to repel insects and moles.
Known Hazards : Although no individual reports regarding this species have been seen, there have been cases of poisoning caused by the consumption, in large quantities and by some mammals, of certain members of this genus. Dogs seem to be particularly susceptible.
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allium_ledebourianum
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Allium+ledebourianum

Gastrodia elata

Botanical Name : Gastrodia elata
Family: Orchidaceae
Subfamily: Epidendroideae
Genus: Gastrodia
Species: G. elata
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asparagales

Common Names: Tien Ma

Habitat :Gastrodia elata is found in Nepal, Bhutan, India, Japan (Hokkaido, Honshu, Shikoku, Kyuushu ), North Korea, Siberia, Taiwan as well as mainland China (Jilin, Liaoning, Inner Mongolia, Hebei, Shanxi, Shanxi, Gansu, Jiangsu, Anhui, Zhejiang, Jiangxi, Henan, Hunan, Hubei, Sichuan, Guizhou, Yunnan, and Tibet) grow at elevations of 400–3200 meters at the edge of forest . It grows in symbiosis with the fungus Armillaria mellea on rotting wood, depending on the hypha of the fungus to invade the root system so that the plant can absorb nutrients from A. mellea.
Description:
Gastrodia elata is a perennial orchid plant.The plant has an 8-12 centimeters long elliptical underground rhizome with a diameter of 3-5 centimeters but may grow up to 7 centimeters. The stem is erect with a height of 0.3-1 meter up to 2 meters, the orange yellow, tan, cylinder, and leafless….CLICK  & SEE THE PICTURES

The flowered pale olivine or the orange red, the scape is length 5-30 centimeters, longest may be 50 centimeters. Floral Bractsare long lanceolate, length 1-1.5 centimeters; Pedicel and ovary of branch 0.7-1.2 centimeter, slightly short in colored bract; The sepal and the petal produce a slanting pot shape perianth tube, the perianth tube long the approximately 1 centimeter, the diameter 5-7 millimeters, The labellum white, circular, with a length of 6-7 millimeters and width of 3-4 millimeters, the tip 3 cracks, the base pastes the tight pistil column full terminal, has a pair of pulp callus, in the callus connection perianth tube. The pistil column length 5-7 millimeters, have the short pistil column foot.

Capsule each approximately 30, oval or but actually oval, length 1.2-1.8 centimeters, width 8-9 millimeters. The seed are most, 2 – 40,000 grains of each fruit, minimum, powdery. Flowering season June to July, fruit time July to August.

The herb is used in Traditional Chinese medicine and Sichuan cuisine.

Cultivation:
A saprophytic herb, it is without green parts and is entirely dependant upon a fungus for its nutriment. This makes it very difficult to cultivate outside its native range. As well as its fungal host, it also requires a damp humus-rich soil in a sheltered woodland position. The plants are very hardy, tolerating temperatures down to at least -15°c. This plant is becoming increasingly rare in the wild, due to over-collection as a medicinal plant. Methods of cultivating it have now been devised in China. Orchids are, in general, shallow-rooting plants of well-drained low-fertility soils. Their symbiotic relationship with a fungus in the soil allows them to obtain sufficient nutrients and be able to compete successfully with other plants. They are very sensitive to the addition of fertilizers or fungicides since these can harm the symbiotic fungus and thus kill the orchid.

Propagation:
Seed – surface sow, preferably as soon as it is ripe, into the plants natural habitat near existing colonies, or onto a bed of Quercus wood inoculated with the fungus Armillaria mellea (introduce this fungus into your land with extreme caution since it kills trees and there is no known preventative). The seed of this species is extremely simple, it has a minute embryo surrounded by a single layer of protective cells. It contains very little food reserves and depends upon a symbiotic relationship with a species of soil-dwelling fungus. The fungal hyphae invade the seed and enter the cells of the embryo. The orchid soon begins to digest the fungal tissue and this acts as a food supply for the plant. Division in autumn. The plant is very intolerant of root disturbance, any moving or dividing should be attempted in the autumn, keep a large ball of soil around the plant .
Edible Uses:     Root is eaten raw or roasted. Large

Chemical Constituents:
4-Hydroxybenzaldehyde and gastrodin can be found in the orchid Gastrodia elata. It also produces 2,4-Bis(4-hydroxybenzyl) phenol, gastrol, gastrodigenin and other related compounds.

Medicinal Uses:
Analgesic; Antispasmodic; Aphrodisiac; Carminative; Cholagogue; Sedative; Tonic.

This species has been used in Chinese herbal medicine for over 1,500 years. The root contains a number of phenolic compounds with medicinal actions. It is a sweet, acrid, herb that is analgesic, anticonvulsive, antispasmodic, carminative, cholagogue, sedative and tonic. It is used internally in the treatment of convulsive illnesses (such as epilepsy and tetanus), rheumatoid arthritis, vertigo and numbness associated with liver disharmony. The root is harvested in the autumn and dried for later use. The stem is aphrodisiac and tonic.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gastrodia_elata
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Gastrodia+elata

Rosebay(Rhododendron anthopogon)

Botanical Name :Rhododendron anthopogon
Family: Ericaceae
Subfamily: Ericoideae
Tribes: Rhodoreae
Genus: Rhododendron
Subgenus: R. subg. Rhododendron
Sectio: R. sect. Pogonathum Sectio: R. sect. Pogonathum
Species: Rhododendron anthopogon
Subspecies: R. a. subsp. anthopogon – R. to. subsp. hypenanthum
Common Names:Rosebay, snow Rose,Dwarf Rhododendron, Talis (Hindi), Talisri (Hindi)

Habitat :
E. Asia – W. China to the Himalayas. The herb is widely cultivated in Inner Mongolia and in the Jilin and Heilongjiang provinces of China.Moist open slopes, hillsides, ledges of cliffs and in thickets at elevations of 3000 – 4500, occasionally to 5000 metres

Description:
An evergreen Shrub growing to 0.6 m (2ft) by 0.6 m (2ft in).
It is hardy to zone 7. It is in leaf 12-Jan It is in flower from Apr to May, and the seeds ripen from Jul to August. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES.

The white or yellow flowers, tinged with pink, grow in small compact clusters of 4-6 and each flower is 2 cm across. The dark green oval leaves are strongly aromatic and densely scaly underneath. The leaves are mixed with Juniper and used as incense in Buddhist monastries as well as in Hindu religious ceremonies.

 

The plant prefers light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and requires well-drained soil.The plant prefers acid soils. and can grow in very acid soils.
It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires moist soil.

Cultivation:
Succeeds in a most humus-rich lime-free soils except those of a dry arid nature or those that are heavy or clayey. Prefers a peaty or well-drained sandy loam. Succeeds in sun or shade, the warmer the climate the more shade a plant requires. A pH between 4.5 and 5.5 is ideal. Succeeds in a woodland though, because of its surface-rooting habit, it does not compete well with surface-rooting trees. Plants need to be kept well weeded, they dislike other plants growing over or into their root system, in particular they grow badly with ground cover plants, herbaceous plants and heathers. Plants form a root ball and are very tolerant of being transplanted, even when quite large, so long as the root ball is kept intact. The whole plant is strongly aromatic with a slightly acrid odour, especially when crushed. Plants in this genus are notably susceptible to honey fungus.

Propagation:
Seed – best sown in a greenhouse as soon as it is ripe in the autumn and given artificial light. Alternatively sow the seed in a lightly shaded part of the warm greenhouse in late winter or in a cold greenhouse in April. Surface-sow the seed and do not allow the compost to become dry. Pot up the seedlings when they are large enough to handle and grow on in a greenhouse for at least the first winter. Layering in late July. Takes 15 – 24 months. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, August in a frame. Difficult.

Edible Uses
The flowers are used as a tea substitute.

Medicinal Uses:
Antitussive;  Diaphoretic;  Digestive;  Febrifuge;  Tonic.

The stems and leaves of the sub-species R. anthopogon hypenanthum are used in Tibetan herbalism. They have a sweet, bitter and astringent taste and they promote heat. They are antitussive, diaphoretic and digestive and are used to treat lack of appetite, coughing and various skin disorders. In Nepal, the leaves are boiled and the vapour inhaled to treat coughs and colds. The flowers of the sub-species R. anthopogon hypenanthum are also used in Tibetan medicine, having a sweet taste and neutral potency. They are antitussive, febrifuge and tonic, being used in the treatment of inflammations, lung disorders and general weakening of the body. They are also used when water and locality are not agreeable due to a change of environment.

In Nepal, Dwarf Rhododendron is used in making an essential oil. Anthopogon oil, as it is usually referred to in Nepal, is obtained by steam distillation of the aerial part of this shrub. It is a fluid liquid of pale yellow colour and sweet-herbal, faintly balsamic aroma. Rhododendron can be used in gouty rheumatic conditions. The essential oil is a stimulant and affects fibrous tissue, bones and nervous system.

you may click to see :Benefits of the Rhododendron Herb

Other Uses
Incense.

The dried leaves are used as incense.

Known Hazards :  Although no specific mention of toxicity has been seen for this species, it belongs to a genus where many members have poisonous leaves. The pollen of many if not all species of rhododendrons is also probably toxic, being said to cause intoxication when eaten in large quantities.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.rmrp.com/Photo%20Pages/RR/Rhododendron%20anthopogon%203%20100DPI.htm
http://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Rhododendron_anthopogon
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Rhododendron+anthopogon
http://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Dwarf%20Rhododendron.html?

Ma Huang (Ephedra sinica)

Botanical Name: Ephedra sinica
Family: Ephedraceae
Genus: Ephedra
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Gnetophyta
Class: Gnetopsida
Order: Ephedrales
Common Names: Ephedra, Ma Huang,Joint-pine, Jointfir, Mormon-tea or Brigham Tea.
The Chinese name is má huáng, which means “yellow hemp”. Ephedra is also sometimes called sea grape (from the French raisin de mer), although that is also a common name for Coccoloba uvifera.

Ephedra sinica Stapf. Engl.: Chinese ephedra, Chinese joint-fir. Suom.: efedra. Sven.: efedra. TCM: ma huang, cao ma huang

Habitat :These plants occur in dry climates over a wide area mainly in the northern hemisphere, across southern Europe, north Africa, southwest and central Asia, southwestern North America, and, in the southern hemisphere, in South America south to Patagonia.

Description: Ephedra is a shrublike plant found in desert regions throughout the world. It is distributed from northern China to Inner Mongolia. The dried green stems of the three Asian species (E. sinica, intermedia, equisetina) are the plant parts employed medicinally. The North American species of ephedra does not appear to contain the active ingredients of its Asian counterparts. The plants are 1.5 to 4 foot high. They typically grow on dry, rocky, or sandy slopes. The many slender, yellow green branches of ephedra have two very small leaf scales at each node. The mature, double seeded cones are visible in the fall.

click to see the pictures…..>…….(01).…….(1)..……...(2).………………….

Species
Ephedra alata Decne
Ephedra altissima Desf.
Ephedra americana Humb. & Bonpl. ex Willd.
Ephedra antisyphilitica Berl. ex C.A.Meyer – Clapweed, Erect Ephedra
Ephedra aspera Engelm. ex S.Wats. – Boundary Ephedra, Pitamoreal
Ephedra boelckei F.A.Roig
Ephedra californica S.Wats. – California Ephedra, California Jointfir
Ephedra campylopoda C. A. Mey.
Ephedra chilensis C. Presl
Ephedra ciliata Fisch. ex C. A. Mey.
Ephedra coryi E.L.Reed – Cory’s Ephedra
Ephedra cutleri Peebles – Navajo Ephedra, Cutler’s Ephedra, Cutler Mormon-tea, Cutler’s Jointfir
Ephedra dahurica Turcz.
Ephedra distachya L. – Joint-pine, Jointfir
Ephedra distachya L. subsp. distachya
Ephedra distachya subsp. helvetica (C.A.Meyer) Aschers. & Graebn.
Ephedra distachya L. subsp. monostachya (L.) Riedl
Ephedra equisetina Bunge – Ma huang
Ephedra fasciculata A.Nels. – Arizona Ephedra, Arizona Jointfir, Desert Mormon-tea Photo
Ephedra fedtschenkoae Pauls.
Ephedra foliata Boiss. ex C.A.Mey.
Ephedra fragilis Desf.
Ephedra fragilis subsp. campylopoda (C.A.Meyer) Aschers. & Graebn.
Ephedra frustillata Miers – Patagonian Ephedra
Ephedra funerea Coville & Morton – Death Valley Ephedra, Death Valley Jointfir
Ephedra gerardiana Wallich ex C.A.Meyer – Gerard’s Jointfir, Shan Ling Ma Huang
Ephedra holoptera Riedl
Ephedra intermedia Schrenk ex C.A.Meyer
Ephedra lepidosperma C.Y.Cheng

Ephedra distachyaEphedra likiangensis Florin
Ephedra lomatolepis Shrenk
Ephedra macedonica Kos.
Ephedra major Host
Ephedra major subsp. procera Fischer & C.A.Meyer
Ephedra minuta Florin
Ephedra monosperma C.A.Meyer
Ephedra multiflora Phil. ex Stapf
Ephedra nevadensis S.Wats. – Nevada Ephedra, Nevada Jointfir, Nevada Mormon-tea
Ephedra pachyclada Boiss.
Ephedra pedunculata Engelm. ex S.Wats. – Vine Ephedra, Vine Jointfir
Ephedra procera Fisch. & C. A. Mey.
Ephedra przewalskii Stapf
Ephedra przewalskii var. kaschgarica (B.Fedtsch. & Bobr.) C.Y.Cheng
Ephedra regeliana Florin – Xi Zi Ma Huang
Ephedra saxatilis (Stapf) Royle ex Florin
Ephedra sinica Stapf – Cao Ma Huang, Chinese ephedra
Ephedra strobilacea Bunge
Ephedra torreyana S.Wats. – Torrey’s Ephedra, Torrey’s Jointfir, Torrey’s Mormon-tea, Cañutillo
Ephedra trifurca Torrey ex S.Wats. – Longleaf Ephedra, Longleaf Jointfir, Longleaf Mormon-tea, Popotilla, Teposote
Ephedra viridis Coville – Green Ephedra, Green Mormon-tea

Active Compounds:
Ephedra’s active medicinal ingredients are the alkaloids ephedrine and pseudoephedrine. The stem contains 1-3% total alkaloids, with ephedrine accounting for 30-90% of this total, depending on the plant species employed. Both ephedrine and its synthetic counterparts stimulate the central nervous system, dilate the bronchial tubes, elevate blood pressure, and increase heart rate. Pseudoephedrine (the synthetic form) is a popular over-the-counter remedy for relief of nasal congestion.

Biochemistry and pharmacology
The alkaloids ephedrine and pseudoephedrine are the active constituents of the plant. Pseudoephedrine is used in over-the-counter decongestants. Derivatives of ephedrine are used to treat low blood pressure, but alternatives with reduced cardiovascular risk have replaced it for treating asthma. Ephedrine is also considered a performance-enhancing drug and is prohibited in most competitive sports. Some species in the Ephedra genus have no alkaloid content; however, the most commonly used species, E. sinica, has a total alkaloid content of 1–3% by dry weight. Ephedrine constitutes 40–90% of the alkaloid content, with the remainder consisting of pseudoephedrine and the demethylated forms of each compound.

Medical uses:
Plants of the Ephedra genus, including E. sinica and others, have traditionally been used by indigenous people for a variety of medicinal purposes, including treatment of asthma, hay fever, and the common cold. They have also been proposed as a candidate for the Soma plant of Indo-Iranian religion. The alkaloids ephedrine and pseudoephedrine are active constituents of E. sinica and other members of the genus. These compounds are sympathomimetics with stimulant and decongestant qualities and are related chemically to the amphetamines. Ephedra nevadensis contains ephedrine in its roots, stems and branches. Ephedra distachya contains up to 3% ephedrine in the entire plant. Ephedra sinica contains approximately 2.2% ephedrine.

The stems of the ephedra plant can be brewed into a pungent, bitter, herb tea that dilates the bronchial vessels while stimulating the heart and central nervous system.

The active chemical components of ephedra, or ma huang, the alkaloids ephedrine and pseudo ephedrine, are found in over the counter allergy and cold medications as over-the-counter decongestants. . An internal review of FDA records between 1969 and September 2006 found 54 reports of deaths in children associated with decongestant medicines containing pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine or ephedrine, prompting the recent recall of these medications in children’s cold care products.

The phytochemical ephedrine possesses properties similar to adrenaline that serves a critical role in our system as a neurotransmitter and a modulator of our metabolic rate. This powerful stimulant action is the major reason why it is so dangerous when misused. Ephedra has fallen into disfavor because of its misuse in the west as a diet drug. A handful of people have died over the last few years prompting the FDA to ban its use.

Herbalists, however, use the whole plant which contains six other related alkaloids, one of which, pseudoephedrine, actually reduces the heart rate and lowers blood pressure. This plant has been used in China for thousands of years, yet no undesirable side-effects have been recorded from the proper administration of the whole plant. Mabey, Richard ,48 Those wishing to use the whole herb to treat allergies and asthma can still buy bulk ephedra from reputable whole herb sources such as Mountain Rose, however it is recommended that it be used under only under supervision of a qualified herbalist.

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Traditional Chinese Medicine

Ma Huang has a 5,000 year history of use in Chinese medicine as an asthma treatment and is traditionally prescribed in TCM as an effective treatment of hay fever, edema, arthritis, colds, asthma, bronchitis and hives.

Weight Loss Aid: Ephedrine suppresses the appetite and increases the metabolic rate of adipose tissue. Ephedrine activates the sympathetic nervous system, increasing the metabolic rate and increasing the amount of the food converted to heat (thermogenesis). This prevents the body from converting these foods to fat, thus helping in the control of weight gain by those who have low metabolism.

Ephedrine is often used in conjunction with methylxanthine sources such as coffee, tea, cola nut, and guarana. The methylxanthines enhances the thermogenic effect of ephedrine. Clinical studies have also shown that aspirin may be effective in increasing the thermogenic effect of ephedrine.


Side Effects:

The herb and its extracts are potentially addictive, and can disrupt regular heart rhythm, induce cardiac arrest, and raise blood pressure. They are very likely to make you sweat profusely, become irritable, nervous, nauseous and cause insomnia.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.holisticonline.com/herbal-med/_herbs/h53.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ephedra_sinica
http://www.anniesremedy.com/herb_detail298.php
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ephedra