Oat Fiber

 OAT FIBER is good for gas and upset stomach; helps prevent heart disease by reducing cholesterol; good source of VITAMIN B; good for skin and hemorrhoids – the extract has a calming effect on the body…..CLICK & SEE

OAT formulas relieve pain of the liver and gall bladder which may occur after excessive ingestion of fatty foods, alcohol or coffee. Such are useful when a person has been exposed to aromatic hydrocarbons including solvents and paints. This type of formula stimulates enzyme production, white blood cell cleaning and increases blood supply to the liver.

OATS are an effective cholesterol fighter. OATS also contain cancer-battling SELENIUM, and POTASSIUM, B VITAMINS and IRON). PUFFED WHEAT and OATMEAL are high in ZINC.

The correct diet should have fiber in it to help to regulate blood glucose levels, aid in lowering cholesterol, and help in the removal of toxins. Oat Fiber is a convenient method of adding beneficial Fiber to your daily diet. More concentrated than oat bran, oat fiber is about 90% dietary fiber by weight.

Heart disease is the number one killer in America. No wonder Americans are more concerned about having a healthy diet. Oats are high in soluble dietary fiber. Soluble dietary fiber helps lower blood cholesterol, therefore, reducing the risk of heart disease. Oat fiber contains more soluble dietary fiber than oats or even oat bran.

Oat fiber also serves as an excellent addition to low carbohydrate recipes. 100% Oat fiber. 0 net carbs. Oat fiber, which is an ingredient low in available carbohydrates, absorbs up to seven times its weight in water making it useful for the bakery and snacks, dairy and meat industries. When added to bakery products, oat fiber allows for the production of low carbohydrate breads, pastries, muffins, bagels, tacos and tortillas.

From the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition (BMD, KPD, RCH, and CLM) and the Department of Health and Exercise Science (KPD, SDB, and LRD), Colorado State University, Fort Collins.

Background: No studies have examined whether increased consumption of oat cereal, rich in soluble fiber, favorably alters lipoprotein particle size and number.

Objective: Examined the effects of large servings of either oat or wheat cereal on plasma lipids, lipoprotein subclasses, lipoprotein particle diameters, and LDL particle number.

Design: Thirty-six overweight men aged 50–75 y were randomly assigned to consume daily for 12 wk either oat or wheat cereal providing 14 g dietary fiber/d. Before and after the intervention, plasma lipid and lipoprotein subclasses were measured with proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and whole-body insulin sensitivity was estimated with the frequently sampled intravenous-glucose-tolerance test.

Results: Time-by-treatment interactions (P < 0.05) for LDL cholesterol (oat: -2.5%; wheat: 8.0%), small LDL cholesterol (oat: -17.3%; wheat: 60.4%), LDL particle number (oat: -5.0%; wheat: 14.2%), and LDL:HDL cholesterol (oat: -6.3%; wheat: 14.2%) were observed. Time-by-treatment interactions were nearly significant for total cholesterol (oat: -2.5%; wheat: 6.3%; P = 0.08), triacylglycerol (oat: -6.6%; wheat: 22.0%; P = 0.07), and VLDL triacylglycerol (oat: -7.6%; wheat: 2.7%; P = 0.08). No significant time-by-treatment interactions were observed for HDL cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol subclasses, or LDL, HDL, and VLDL particle diameters. Insulin sensitivity did not change significantly with either intervention.

Conclusions: The oat compared with the wheat cereal produced lower concentrations of small, dense LDL cholesterol and LDL particle number without producing adverse changes in blood triacylglycerol or HDL-cholesterol concentrations. These beneficial alterations may contribute to the cardioprotective effect of oat fiber.

Help taken from:Dr.Yang’s Herbs & Gems for Health and American Journal of Clinical Nutrition,


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