Not to Get Pregnant

I have done something wrong,” said the young woman. No, it was not theft or murder she was confessing to but unprotected sex. An unguarded passionate moment with her boyfriend had made her pregnant. She was terrified of the stigma — the boyfriend was still a student, there was no way they could get married right away.
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This is quite a common scenario in urban as well as rural India. Women increasingly face the problems of unplanned and unwanted pregnancies. It’s most important that they know how to take care of themselves, married or single.

First, women need to be in control of their bodies, especially when it comes to sexual intercourse, pregnancy and childbirth. Many safe women-oriented contraceptive methods are available.

Women become pregnant only on certain days of the month. The ovum or egg of a fertile woman is released 14 days before her next period. The egg survives 12 to 24 hours after release and the sperm for up to 72 hours. Couples may refrain from intercourse on these days if they wish to avoid pregnancy. This method, however, is not reliable as many women do not menstruate with clockwork precision.

Women may use contraceptive creams containing nonoxynol-9 in the vagina. These substances increase the effectiveness of the safe period. They are effective for about an hour. But they do not suit everyone and may cause vaginal irritation or allergic reactions. They are available in pharmacies without a prescription.

Diaphragms can be inserted prior to intercourse. These come in various sizes and need to be combined with a spermicide. An initial medical examination is needed to confirm the size. The device has to be left in the vagina for eight to 12 hours after intercourse but should be removed within 24 hours.

Women can also opt for an intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD), popularly known as a “copper T”. These need to be inserted by a medical professional. They can work for three, five or 10 years, depending on the type and manufacturer’s recommendations. Imported devices can be purchased from the pharmacy. Also, free IUCDs are distributed by the government.

“Depo” injections of long-acting progesterone are available
. A woman needs to have an injection every 12 weeks. They can cause weight gain, irregular cycles, breakthrough bleeding or spotting. The irregular periods can raise the spectre of an unwanted pregnancy.

Oral contraceptive pills (OCP) prevent pregnancy if taken regularly.
There are combination pills containing estrogen and progesterone with different trade names. They are also provided free by the government (Mala D). The active ingredient is given for 21 days. Then there is a pill-free interval of seven days after which the next lot needs to be started. Sometimes placebo pills are administered during the pill-free period. They prevent pregnancy as well as regularise the cycle. They do not increase the risk of cancer.

Breast feeding women can opt for “progesterone only” pills. These are taken without a pill-free interval.

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There’s a new contraceptive in the market — a plastic ring impregnated with estrogen and progesterone. The ring needs to be inserted in the vagina and left there for three weeks followed by a one week ring-free interval. A woman can purchase and insert the ring herself. An advantage of this over the pill is that the question of forgetting the latter does not arise.

Condoms can be used by the male partner. These have to be used from the beginning to the end of intercourse, and can be combined with a spermicidal cream.

Casual sex and multiple partners can result in sexually transmitted diseases. Some like Hepatitis B and HIV can eventually be fatal. Only condoms can prevent these diseases.

Even if you have had unplanned and unprotected sex, you can use emergency contraception (morning after) pills. Although theoretically these pills should be dispensed only by prescription, in many places they are available over the counter (OTC). The tablet should be taken after intercourse as soon as possible. It is 80 per cent effective if taken within 72 hours.

The morning after pill contains either progesterone or a combination of estrogen and progesterone in higher doses than in the 21 or 28-day packs of OCPs. An alternative is to take four low-dose or two “standard-dose” OCPs, and then take an equal dose 12 hours later.

If an unwanted pregnancy occurs, do not buy medicine OTC or rush to an unqualified quack out of shame or fear. Medical abortion pills are available and effective. They work up to the 49th day after the last period.

The last two are stopgap emergency measures. They are not to be considered regular methods of contraception. They are detrimental to health if repeatedly used.

Source : The Teleghraph ( Kolkata, India)

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