Artemisia keiskeana

Botanical Name:Artemisia keiskeana
Family:Asteraceae
Subfamily: Asteroideae
Genus: Artemisia
Tribe: Anthemideae
Order:Asterales

Other Names :An Lu,Wormwood Keyzke

Habitat : Prevalent in E. Asia – China, Japan, Korea and eastern Russia the Far East (south of the Amur Region, Maritime Territory).  Growing on slopes of hills, forests, occasionally on the slopes, on the ledges of the rocks.

Description:
Artemisia keiskeana is a perennial herbaceous plant 20-50 cm rhizome robust, branched, with creeping stems.  Part of the stems is creeping, rooting tip, the rest-ascending, leafy, erect, pubescent, up almost naked.  Leaves are simple, oval in outline, green top, bottom, light green, the lower petiolate, upper sessile, base cuneate, with three – seven broadly sharp blades or in the upper sessile leaves with three short, sharp teeth.  Baskets on long stalks almost spherical, in short racemes; achene plano-convex, ovoid, dark brown, smooth.  It is in flower from Aug to November, and the seeds ripen from Sep to November. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.

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The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought.

Cultivation:
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in many parts of this country. This species is closely related to A. dracunculus. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Easily grown in a well-drained circumneutral or slightly alkaline loamy soil, preferring a warm sunny dry position. Established plants are drought tolerant. Plants are longer lived, more hardy and more aromatic when they are grown in a poor dry soil. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.

Propagation:
Seed – surface sow from late winter to early summer in a greenhouse, making sure that the compost does not dry out. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer. Division in spring or autumn. Basal cuttings in late spring. Harvest the young shoots when about10 – 15cm long, pot up in a lightly shaded position in a greenhouse or cold frame and plant them out when well rooted. Very easy.

Edible Uses: Leaves are edible.Young leaves and shoot tips – cooked. The leaves contain about 5.6% protein, 1.2% fat, 9.5% carbohydrate, 2.6% ash.

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Composition
Figures in grams (g) or miligrams (mg) per 100g of food.

Leaves (Fresh weight)
•0 Calories per 100g
•Water : 0%
•Protein: 5.6g; Fat: 1.2g; Carbohydrate: 9.5g; Fibre: 0g; Ash: 2.6g;
•Minerals – Calcium: 0mg; Phosphorus: 0mg; Iron: 0mg; Magnesium: 0mg; Sodium: 0mg; Potassium: 0mg; Zinc: 0mg;
•Vitamins – A: 0mg; Thiamine (B1): 0mg; Riboflavin (B2): 0mg; Niacin: 0mg; B6: 0mg; C: 0mg;

Medicinal Uses:
The seeds have a reputation for correcting sexual impotence in men and amenorrhea in women.  An infusion of the seeds also is used for post-partum pain.

Decoction of seeds in the traditional Tibetan medicine used for impotence, amenorrhea, postpartum pain, with bruises,

prophylactically in abscess. Experiments have revealed cholagogue properties of the plant.

Other  Uses:The stalks are used for thatching.

Known Hazards:Although no reports of toxicity have been seen for this species, skin contact with some members of this genus can cause dermatitis or other allergic reactions in some people.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://fitoapteka.org/herbs-p/4078-101030-artemisia-keiskeana
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Artemisia_keiskeana
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Artemisia%20keiskeana
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_AB.htm

 

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