Lumbar Spondylosis

Definition:
Lumbar Spondylosis is a condition associated with degenerative changes in the intervertebral discs and facet joints. Spondylosis, also known as spinal osteoarthritis, can affect the lumbar, thoracic, and/or the cervical regions of the spine. Although aging is the primary cause, the location and rate of degeneration is individual. As the lumbar discs and associated ligaments undergo aging, the disc spaces frequently narrow. Thickening of the ligaments that surround the disc and those that surround the facet joints develops. These ligamentous thickening may eventually become calcified. Compromise of the spinal canal or of the openings through which the spinal nerves leave the spinal canal can occur.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Lumbar spondylosis encompasses lumbar disc bulges, herniations, facet joint degeneration, and vertebral bony overgrowths (osteophytes). Degenerative changes, including osteophyte formation, increase with age but are often asymptomatic. Disc herniation is symptomatic when it causes nerve root compression and spinal stenosis. Common symptoms include low back pain, sciatica, and restriction in back movement. Treatment is usually conservative, although surgery is indicated for spinal cord compression or intractable pain. Relapse is common, with patients experiencing episodic back pain.

Symptoms:
Symptoms of lumbar spondylosis follow those associated with each of the various aspects of the disorder: disc herniation, sciatica, spinal stenosis, degenerative spondylolisthesis, and degenerative scoliosis. Pain associated with disc degeneration may be felt locally in the back or at a distance away. This is called referred pain, as the pain is not felt at its site of origin. Lower back arthritis may be felt as pain in the buttock, hips, groin, and thighs. As with spinal stenosis or disc herniation in the lumbar region, it is important to be aware of any bowel or bladder incontinence, or numbness in the perianal area. These signs and symptoms could represent an important massive nerve compression needing surgical intervention (cauda equina syndrome).

Causes:
Spondylosis is mainly caused by ageing. As people age, certain biological and chemical changes cause tissues throughout the body to degenerate. In the spine, the vertebrae (spinal bones) and intervertebral discs degenerate with ageing. the intervertebral discs are cushion like structures that act as shock absorbers between the vertebral bones.

One of the structures that form the discs is known as the annulus fibrosus. The annulus fibrosus is made up of the 60 or more tough circular bands of collagen fiber (called lamellae). Collagen is a type of inelastic fiber. Collagen fibers, along with water and proteoglycans (types of large molecules made of a protein and at least one carbohydrate chain) help to form the soft, gel-like center part of each disk. This soft, center part is known as the nucleus pulposus and is surrounded by the annulus fibrosus.

The degenerative effects of ageing can cause the fibers of the discs to weaken, causing wear and tear. Constant wear and tear and injury to the joints of the vertebrae causes inflammation in the joints. Degeneration of the discs leads to the formation of mineral deposits within the discs. The water content of the center of the disc decreases with age and as a result the discs become hard, stiff, and decreased in size. This, in turn, results in strain on all the surrounding joints and tissues, causing the sensation of stiffness. With less water in the center of the discs, they have decreased shock absorbing qualities. An increased risk of disc herniation also results, which is when the disc abnormally protrudes from its normal position.

Each vertebral body contains four joints that act as hinges. These hinges are known as facet joints or zygapophyseal joints. The job of the facet joins is to allow the spinal column to flex, extend, and rotate. The bones of the facet joints are covered with cartilage (a type of flexible tissue) known as end plates. The job of the end plates is to attach the disks to the vertebrae and to supply nutrients to the disc. When the facet joints degenerate, the size of the end plates can decrease and stiffen. Movement can stimulate pain fibers in the facet joints and annulus fibrosus. Furthermore, the vertebral bone underneath the end plates can become thick and hard.

Degenerative disease can cause ligaments to lose their strength. A ligament is a tough band of tissue that attaches to joint bones. In the spine, ligaments connect spinal structures such as vertebrae and prevent them from moving too much. In degenerative spondylosis, one of the main ligaments (known as the ligamentum flavum) can thicken or buckle, making it weaken.

Knobby, abnormal bone growths (known as bone spurs or osteophytes) can form in the vertebrae. These changes can also cause osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is a disease of the joints that is made worse by stress. In more severe cases, these bones spurs can compress nerves coming out of the spinal cord and/or decreased blood supply to the vertebrae. Areas of the body supplied by these nerves may become painful or develop loss of sensation and function.

Carrying around excessive weight can cause lumbar spondylosis. Spending much of the day seated can also be a contributing factor. An injury or trauma to the back can also contribute, as can genetic factors.

The main Risk Factors:
• Age: As a person ages the healing ability of the body decreases and developing arthritis at that time can make the disease progress much faster. Persons over 40 years of age are more prone to developing lumbar spondylosis.

• Obesity: Overweight puts excess load on the joints as the lumbar region carries most of the body’s weight, making a person prone to lumbar spondylosis.

• Sitting for prolonged periods: Sitting in one position for prolonged time which puts pressure on the lumbar vertebrae.

Your ads will be inserted here by

Easy Plugin for AdSense.

Please go to the plugin admin page to
Paste your ad code OR
Suppress this ad slot.

• Prior injury: Trauma makes a person more susceptible to developing lumbar spondylosis.

• Heredity or Family history
Diagnosis:
Physical Examination:
A thorough physical examination reveals much about the patient’s health and general fitness. The physical part of the exam includes a review of the patient’s medical and family history. Often laboratory tests such as complete blood count and urinalysis are ordered. The physical exam may include:

*Palpation (exam by touch) determines spinal abnormalities, areas of tenderness, and muscle spasm.

*Range of Motion measures the degree to which a patient can perform movement of flexion, extension, lateral bending, and spinal rotation.

*A neurologic evaluation assesses the patient’s symptoms including pain, numbness, paresthesias (e.g. tingling), extremity sensation and motor function, muscle spasm, weakness, and bowel/bladder changes. Particular attention may be given to the extremities. Either a CT Scan or MRI study may be required if there is evidence of neurologic dysfunction.

X-rays and Other Tests:
Radiographs (X-rays) may indicate loss of vertebral disc height and the presence of osteophytes, but is not as useful as a CT Scan or MRI. A CT Scan may help reveal bony changes sometimes associated with spondylosis. An MRI is a sensitive imaging tool capable of revealing disc, ligament, and nerve abnormalities. Discography seeks to reproduce the patient’s symptoms to identify the anatomical source of pain. Facet blocks work in a similar manner. Both are considered controversial.

The physician compares the patient’s symptoms to the findings to formulate a diagnosis and treatment plan. The results from the examination provide a baseline from which the physician can monitor and measure the patient’s progress.

Treatment:
Each patient is treated differently for arthritis depending on their individual condition. In the early stages lifestyle modifications or medicines are used for treatment and surgery is needed only if these measures are ineffective.

Yoga:
A few yoga poses and sequences can help lumbar spondylosis. Sun salutations, also known as Surya Namaskar A and B, are good for back strengthening and flexibility. The cobra pose, or Bhjangasana, stretches the lower back. The locust pose, or Shalabhasana, strengthens the lower back because it requires lifting one’s upper and lower body off the ground from a prone position on the floor. Meditation & pranayam 

Exercises:
Physical therapy is often prescribed to relieve problems caused by lumbar spondylosis. Back extensions are used on patients who can tolerate them. The patient lies face down on her stomach and then slowly lifts only her upper body off the floor. The arms may be placed palms down under her chest to take some strain off the back muscles. If lying down is too painful, this exercise can also be done against a wall. The patient puts her hands against a wall, standing about a foot away, and bends back, using a combination of lower back muscles and arms.

Stretches to Avoid:
Lying on the back and bringing the knees into the chest is an example of a common lower back stretch that flexes the spine. This is not recommended for people with lumbar spondylosis. Bending down to touch one’s toes from a standing position is also not recommended. Reaching for the toes while sitting can be problematic, too.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

Resources:
http://www.ehow.com/about_5039006_lumbar-spondylosis-exercises.html
http://www.physiotherapy-treatment.com/lumbar-spondylosis.html

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *