FDA Forced to Admit That Mercury Fillings are Hazardous

If you’re like most people, you probably have cavities that have been filled with metal or a silver-mercury amalgam. While you probably recognize that such fillings are unattractive in your smile, you might not realize that they’re hazardous to your teeth.

Silver-mercury fillings react to temperature changes, expanding and contracting within your delicate tooth. This movement can weaken the tooth, causing it to break. It can also create a space between the tooth surface and filling that allows bacteria to enter, causing decay.

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Old, broken mercury fillings were replaced with beautiful, strong Porcelain onlays.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has finally admitted that metal dental fillings containing mercury can cause health problems in pregnant women, children and fetuses.
As part of the settlement of a lawsuit filed by several consumer advocacy groups, the FDA agreed to alert consumers about the potential risks on its Web site and to issue a more specific rule next year for fillings that contain mercury.

The FDA’s Web site now states that: “Dental amalgams contain mercury, which may have neurotoxic effects on the nervous systems of developing children and fetuses.”

Charles Brown, a lawyer for advocacy group Consumers for Dental Choice, said the agency’s move represented an about-face. According to Brown, “Gone, gone, gone are all of FDA’s claims that no science exists that amalgam is unsafe … The impact of the re-writing of its position on amalgam can hardly be understated. FDA’s website will no longer be cited by the American Dental Association in public hearings.”

You may click to see:->Mercury in your brain from amalgam fillings in your mouth.

>Amalgam Fillings: They are Hazardous to Your Health

Sources:

* eMax Health

* Reuters June 4, 2008

Fast Food Goes Organic

Organic to Go, a Seattle organic fast food company founded in 2004, has purchased cafes and catering operations. The company plans to create lunch places serving organic meals.

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People who eat meals out increasingly want more nutritious food. More than 76 percent of the people in a recent poll said they are trying to eat out more healthfully than they were two years ago.

Another showed that, after bite-sized desserts, the hottest trends in food were locally grown and organic produce.

Organic to Go opened its first cafe three years ago. Now it boasts 33 outposts in Seattle, San Diego, Los Angeles and Washington D.C.

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Sources: Washington Post June 3, 2008

Infant Fever

A mother holds her baby while it is immunized

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Fevers are fact of life for most children. In most cases they are nothing to worry about, but it is important to monitor the symptoms closely and to seek medical advice if they persist.

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What is a fever?

Fever has been defined as a body temperature elevated to at least 1F above the ‘normal’ of 98.6F (37.0C).

A baby’s temperature normally varies by as much as 2F, depending on the temperature of his surroundings, clothing worn, degree of stress, level of activity or time of day.

What prompts a fever?

In most cases a fever is the body’s reaction to an acute viral or bacterial infection. Raising the temperature helps create an inhospitable environment for viral or bacterial invaders, it also stimulates the production of disease-fighting white blood cells.

Why are babies prone to fevers?

The body’s temperature control system is not well developed in babies.

Infant and childhood fevers can be caused by a number of different factors including:

* Overexertion
* Dehydration
* Mosquito bites
* Bee stings
* Allergic reactions
* Viral or bacteria infections

What are the symptoms?

Typical symptoms of a fever include coughing, aches or pains, an inability to sleep and shivering.

Other symptoms include poor appetite, lethargy and prolonged irritability.

In some cases breathing may be difficult.

What are the treatments?

Dehydration is a risk for infants, and a feverish baby should always be given lots of fluids.

A child with a temperature of less than 102F (38.8C) does not always require immediate medical attention. The child should be observed, and help sought if the symptoms appear to get worse, or the fever does not subside within 24 hours.

A child with a temperature of 102F or higher should be given paracetamol. A doctor or pharmacist should be consulted for a recommended dose.

A doctor’s advice should always be sought for a child whose temperature is 104F (40C) or higher.

Children should not be given aspirin. Several studies link aspirin use in children with Reye’s Syndrome a severe illness that often is fatal.

Are there danger signs?

Certain symptoms, when combined with a fever, warrant an immediate call to the doctor. These include:

* Red spots on the skin, sensitive eyes and runny nose (measles)
* Red, itchy spots (chicken pox)
* Stiffness in the neck or headache (a sign of a more severe infection)

Febrile seizures

Occasionally, a child with a fever will have a seizure. This is called a febrile seizure, and it demands immediate attention from a doctor.

The seizures do not seem to be related to the height of the fever, or to the rapidity with which it rises, but a small number of children seem to be predisposed to attacks.

About 50% of the children who suffer one febrile seizure will go on to have another one. About 33% will have a third one.

While waiting for a doctor to arrive, it is important to follow basic instructions:

* Keep the child upright and make sure they are breathing well
* Stay with the child and talk reassuringly
* Watch for changes in breathing, and make sure that the airways are kept open
* Clear the area to prevent injury
* Do not restrain as this can cause additional injury
* Try placing a soft pillow or blanket under the child’s head
* Loosen clothing to prevent injury and ease discomfort
* If vomiting occurs, turn the head to the side so there is no risk of his choking on inhaled vomit

You may click to learn more about Infant Fever:->Infants Fever

>Fever Quiz

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

Sources:BBC NEWS:2nd.June,1999

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Hay Fever: Beat the Sneeze

Hay fever sufferers face a really bad summer. Lucy Atkins offers advice.

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This summer’s pollen forecast is one of the worst ever, meaning that about one in four of us can expect to slip into a wheezing fug any minute.

Experts say that we are surprisingly inept at managing our symptoms. Many of us do not understand our hay fever triggers and take inappropriate medications. Others throw away money on alternative “remedies” that do not work.

Simply popping a pill when symptoms get out of hand is not the best approach.

“People don’t realise you have to take the right dose at the right time in order to keep levels of the drug high in your system,” says Maureen Jenkins, allergy nurse and spokeswoman for Allergy UK.

“Otherwise it just won’t work.”

Antihistamine nasal sprays can stop your nose running, nasal steroid sprays can unbung you and sprays containing a drug called sodium cromoglicate, a “mast cell stabiliser”, can stop white blood cells from releasing histamine, which causes the sneezing and itching.

But Jenkins says that “many people have no idea how to use these sprays properly.” It is no good just stuffing the product up your nose – a good spraying technique is vital (see below). It is also important to follow dosage instructions.

The sodium cromoglicate spray, for instance, will only work if you start to use it two weeks before your allergy begins, then keep using it four times a day. Many other medications work best if you start to use them before your allergies kick in, allowing the drug to build up in your system. To do this you have to know your triggers.

Though there are many pollen allergens, birch and grass are the most common. These two are usually released in different months, but experts say that this summer, perhaps because of climate change, they are likely to overlap. According to the Royal Pharmaceutical Society, more than 5million of us could be taking inappropriate medicines because we have misdiagnosed our allergies.

Talking to your pharmacist before buying medicines is the first step to a sniffle-free summer. In addition, Allergy UK has just started an “accredited pharmacy allergy screening service” in association with the National Pharmacy Association. At these centres Allergy UK-trained pharmacists can diagnose triggers then recommend the right over-the-counter medications for your specific allergy type.

They can also refer you to a GP with details of the nearest appropriate allergy specialist. GPs are a good source of help if you are a severe sufferer. Several effective antihistamines can be obtained only on prescription and some people may be suitable for a newly developed kind of immunotherapy, where you either dissolve tablets under the tongue or have regular injections.

Those who want to avoid medication may turn to anything from fish oils to Reishi mushrooms as miracle hay fever cures. But there is no clinical evidence that nutritional supplements or dietary changes work on hay fever symptoms (although the herb butterbur has shown promise in clinical trials).

Acupuncture has had mixed success in trials. Daniel Maxwell of the British Acupuncture Council, says: “It’s great for hay fever because of the significant effect it has on modulating the immune system.”

Homeopathic treatments have also shown some promising clinical results, though more trials are needed. In other words, although you can’t avoid this year’s pollen onslaught, you may be more empowered than you think to defend yourself against it.

Click for natural and home remedy for Hay Fever:->.…………………...(1)…….(2).…….(3)………(4)

Sources:Telegraph.co.uk

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The Omega Balance

Without question, each of us needs omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in our diet. But the balance between the two has recently become the center of a hot debate.

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These two key polyunsaturated fats are called “essential fatty acids” because our bodies can’t manufacture them; they must come from the foods we eat. Each has its own actions in the body, often opposing each other: omega-6s, for example, are converted in the body to substances that assist in responding to inflammation and bleeding; omega-3s, by contrast, convert to substances that slow blood clotting and decrease inflammatory responses. Together, they work as a check-and-balance system of sorts, and some researchers argue that our modern Western diets have thrown that balance out of whack.

Throughout most of human history, since our Paleolithic ancestors first hunted game, speared fish and gathered wild greens, humans have eaten a diet that kept the omega-6 to omega-3 balance fairly equal—”close to a 2 to 1 ratio,” notes Artemis Simopoulos, co-author of The Omega Diet. This pattern continues in the traditional diet of Crete, where heart disease and cancer rates are among the lowest in the world.

But in the United States, omega-6 fatty acids now dominate the ratio because people are eating more processed foods, such as chips and packaged cookies, which are made with high-omega-6 oils like soybean or cottonseed. Our meats, poultry and dairy products have also become more omega-6 heavy as we feed our animals grains instead of grasses. Today, the omega-6 to omega-3 ratio hovers around 17 to 1, says Simopoulos, explaining that this imbalance is a key contributor to the modern plague of heart disease. “Major dietary studies have shown that when people are fed diets that lower this ratio, their death rates from heart disease fall significantly.”

Not everyone agrees that increased omega-6s threaten our health, however. Frank Hu, of the Harvard Nurses’ Health Study, argues that omega-6s also have beneficial effects on heart-disease risk. “Because omega-6 has very strong LDL-lowering effects, it actually lowers the LDL to HDL ratio, which is the most powerful predictor of heart disease.” Reducing omega-6 levels, then, would take away some of those benefits.

Although he is skeptical, Hu suggests the following for anyone who wants to lower their omega-6 to omega-3 ratio: focus on getting more omega-3s, rather than cutting omega-6s, by eating more fish, freshly ground flaxseeds and walnuts, and by using oils that provide omega-3s, like canola and walnut.

Simopoulos counters, “If you have too many omega-6s, you can’t use omega-3s as efficiently. To get the full benefit of omega-3s, you must lower the omega-6 to omega-3 ratio.” She recommends following a dietary pattern similar to that of the traditional diet of Crete: vegetable-and-fruit laden, low in saturated fats, generous in omega-3s and stingy with omega-6s. “It is the diet on which humans evolved, and which our genetic profile has adapted to.”

Related Omega-3 Recipes:

* Basic Basil Pesto
* Orange-Miso Sauce
* Edamame Lo Mein
* Grilled Rosemary-Salmon Spedini
* Chard with Shallots, Pancetta & Walnuts

Sources:http://bl147w.blu147.mail.live.com/mail/mail.aspx?&n=1809073841

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Hysterectomy

A hysterectomy is a major surgical procedure. It always involves removal of the uterus, but can also include the removal of other parts of the genital tract.

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Are there different types of hysterectomy?

Yes. A total hysterectomy is the most common operation and this means removal of the uterus and cervix (neck of the womb).

A sub-total hysterectomy means the removal of the body of the uterus, leaving the cervix behind.

A radical hysterectomy involves the removal of the uterus, cervix, a small portion of the upper part of the vagina and some soft tissue from within the pelvis.

Why is it carried out?

A hysterectomy can help to ease many gynaecological complaints. These include:

* Heavy or very painful periods

* Fibroids: Swellings of abnormal muscle that grow in the uterus, and can cause heavy or painful periods, or problems with urination.

* Prolapse: Where the uterus, or parts of the vaginal wall, drops down.

* Endometriosis: A condition where the cells which line the uterus are found outside the uterus in the pelvis. This can cause scarring around the uterus, and may cause the bladder or rectum to ‘stick’ to the uterus or fallopian tubes.

* Various forms of cancer, including cancer of the cervix, uterus, fallopian tubes, or ovaries.

In most cases – except for cancer – the procedure is usually only used as a last resort.

How is the operation carried out?

The most common method is to cut through the lower abdomen, usually leaving a six-inch scar.

However, doctors may opt in some instances to remove the uterus through the vagina.

Are there any risks?

No operation is risk-free, especially surgery as major as a hysterectomy.

However, the vast majority of women undergo the procedure without any complications.

Obesity can make surgery more tricky, and increase the risk of post-operative complications, such as heavy bleeding.

There is also a small risk of damage to the bladder, or the tubes that carry urine from the kidneys to the bladder.

An uncommon – but serious – complication is the development of a blood clot in the veins of the leg.

Is it a common procedure?

Up to one in five women will undergo a hysterectomy during their lifetime so it is a relatively common operation.

Over 40,000 hysterectomies were carried out in the UK in 2004/2005.

The NHS drug and treatment watchdog, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE), warned in January 2007 that too many women were ‘suffering in silence’ from heavy periods because they feared having to have a hysterectomy.

NICE stressed that drugs and minor surgery could often be effective alternative treatments.

What impact does it have on sex?

A woman who has had a hysterectomy should be able to enjoy a satisfying sex life – in fact many women report that their level of sexual pleasure improves following the surgery.

Provided the surgery goes well, it should be possible to resume a normal sex life about six weeks after the operation.

You may click to see:->Hysterectomy Surgical Procedure

>Medical Encyclopedia:Hysterectomy

Sources: BBC NEWS: February 12,2007

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Why Use Vaccine for HPV When Green Tea Works?

A botanical ointment containing a green tea extract called sinecatechins is an effective treatment for external genital and anal warts, according to the results of a controlled study.

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Genital and anal warts are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), and there has been a lack of effective, well tolerated treatments.

Researchers assigned over 500 adults with 30 warts to either sinecatechins ointment or a placebo. In the sinecatechins groups, warts cleared completely in roughly 57 percent of patients, compared to just 34 percent of subjects in the control group.

Sources:

* Reuters June 6, 2008

* Obstetrics and Gynecology, June 2008; 111(6):1371-1379

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Vitamin D Cuts Down Mortality Rate

Want to live longer? Make sure that you expose yourself to sunlight in moderation daily, for a new study has revealed that vitamin D, which is produced in the body in course of the exposure, cuts down mortality rates.

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Previous studies have indicated that it might offer a variety of other health benefits, including protecting against cancer, peripheral artery disease and tuberculosis.

Now, a team at Graz University in Austria has found that the “sunshine vitamin” helps the body absorb calcium and facilitates growth of bones, which in turn do have a positive impact on death rates.

“This is the first association study that shows vitamin D affects mortality regardless of the (primary) reason for death,” the daily telegraph quoted lead researcher Harald Dobnig as saying.

Vitamin D is also found in milk and in fatty fish like salmon, but many people do not get enough of it. A lack of it can lead to rickets in children and osteoporosis in adults.

Sources: The Times Of India

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How Simple Water Keeps Elderly Healthy

A year ago, 88-year-old Jean Lavender used to find walking any distance a struggle.

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Jean Lavender has been drinking more water under the scheme

Now she is keen to get outside for a walk most days.

And she puts the transformation down to the most simple of medicines – water.

She is one of a group of residents at a care home in Suffolk who have been encouraged to increase their intake of water.

And they have all reported dramatic results.

Jean says she feels 20 years younger.

“I feel more alert – more cheerful too. I’m not a miserable person, but it’s added a sort of zest.”

Staff at The Martins care home in Bury St Edmunds started a “water club” for their residents last summer.

Residents were encouraged to drink eight to 10 glasses of water a day, water coolers were installed, and they were each given a jug for their room.

They report significant improvements in health as a result – many fewer falls, fewer GP call-outs, a cut in the use of laxatives and in urinary infections, better quality of sleep, and lower rates of agitation among residents with dementia.

Dehydration

Doctors have long highlighted the risks of dehydration for elderly people. It can cause dizziness and potentially serious falls, constipation, and confusion.

While most people’s systems can adjust to insufficient water, frail old people are far less equipped to cope.

So when Wendy Tomlinson, a former nurse, took over the management of the charity-run home, she suspected that drinking more water might help the residents feel better.

Even she has been surprised by how much difference it’s made, though.

“It’s been fantastic,” she said. “The whole home buzzes now; there isn’t that period after lunch when everyone goes off to sleep.”

For Baroness Greengross, a cross-bench peer, it reinforces a conviction she has had for some time now – that many old people simply are not drinking enough, and it is harming their health.

She wants to see tougher regulations in care homes across the UK, so that staff have to make sure residents drink enough.

“We hear a great deal about malnutrition among old people,” she says.

“But we forget about the need for them to have enough water. It shouldn’t be very difficult to change the habits of care staff.”

Sources: BBC NEWS:June 23Rd. ’08

Sleepwalking(Somnambulism)

Definition:
Sleepwalking (also called somnambulism or noctambulism) is a parasomnia or sleep disorder where the sufferer engages in activities that are normally associated with wakefulness while he or she is asleep or in a sleep-like state. Sleepwalking is usually defined by or involves the person affected apparently shifting from his or her prior sleeping position and moving around and performing normal actions as if awake (cleaning, walking and other activities). It is a disorder characterized by walking or other activity while seemingly still asleep.Sleepwalkers are not conscious of their actions on a level where memory of the sleepwalking episode can be recalled, and because of this, unless the sleepwalker is woken or aroused by someone else, this sleep disorder can go unnoticed. Sleepwalking is more commonly experienced in people with high levels of stress, anxiety or psychological factors and in people with genetic factors (family history), or sometimes a combination of both.

click to see the pictures

A common misconception is that sleepwalking is acting out the physical movements within a dream, but in fact, sleepwalking occurs earlier on in the night when rapid eye movement (REM), or the “dream stage” of sleep, has not yet occurred.

A majority of people move their legs while sleeping; however, sleepwalking occurs when both legs move in synchronization[citation needed], which is much less common.

Sleepwalking can affect people of any age. It generally occurs when an individual moves during slow wave sleep (during stage 3 or 4 of slow wave sleep—deep sleep) (Horne, 1992; Kales & Kales, 1975). In children and young adults, up to 80% of the night is spent in SWS (50% in infants). However, this decreases as the person ages, until none can be measured in the geriatric individual. For this reason, children and young adults (or anyone else with a high amount of SWS) are more likely to be woken up and, for the same reasons, they are witnessed to have many more episodes than the older individuals.

Causes:
This causes REM atonia, a state in which the motor neurons are not stimulated, and thus the body’s muscles do not move. Lack of such REM atonia causes REM Behavior Disorder.

The normal sleep cycle involves distinct stages from light drowsiness to deep sleep. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is a different type of sleep, in which the eyes move rapidly and vivid dreaming is most common.

During a night, there will be several cycles of non-REM and REM sleep. Sleep walking (somnambulism) most often occurs during deep non-REM sleep (stage 3 or stage 4 sleep) early in the night. It can occur during REM sleep near morning.

 

In children, the cause is usually unknown but may be related to fatigue, prior sleep loss, or anxiety. In adults, sleepwalking is usually associated with a disorder of the mind but may also be seen with reactions to drugs and alcohol, and medical conditions such as partial complex seizures. In the elderly, sleepwalking may be a symptom of an organic brain syndrome or REM behavior disorders.

Incidence:

The sleepwalking activity may include simply sitting up and appearing awake while actually asleep, getting up and walking around, or complex activities such as moving furniture, going to the bathroom, dressing and undressing, and similar activities. Some people even drive a car while actually asleep. The episode can be very brief (a few seconds or minutes) or can last for 30 minutes or longer.

One common misconception is that a sleep walker should not be awakened. It is not dangerous to awaken a sleep walker, although it is common for the person to be confused or disoriented for a short time on awakening. Another misconception is that a person cannot be injured when sleep walking.

Sleep walking occurs at any age, but it occurs most often in children aged 6 to 12. It may occur in younger children, in adults, or in the elderly, and it appears to run in families.

Risk Factors:

Sleepwalkers are more likely to endanger themselves than anyone else.Actually, injuries caused by such things as tripping and loss of balance are common for sleep walkers. When sleepwalkers are a danger to themselves or others (for example, when climbing up or down steps or trying to use a potentially dangerous tool such as a stove or a knife), steering them away from the danger and back to bed is advisable. It has even been reported that people have died or were injured as a result of sleepwalking. Sleepwalking should not be confused with psychosis.

Sleepwalking has in rare cases been used as a defense (sometimes successfully) against charges of murder.

Symptoms:

* eyes open during sleep
* may have blank facial expression
* may sit up and appear awake during sleep
* walking during sleep
* other detailed activity during sleep, any sort
* no recall of the event upon awaking
* confusion, disorientation on awakening
* sleep talking is incomprehensible and non-purposeful

Diagnosis:

Usually, no further examination and testing is necessary. If sleepwalking is frequent or persistent, examination to rule out other disorders (such as partial complex seizures) may be appropriate. It may also be appropriate to undergo a psychologic evaluation to determine causes such as excessive anxiety or stress, or medical evaluation to rule out other causes.

Treatment:

Usually no specific treatment for sleepwalking is needed.

Safety measures may be necessary to prevent injury. This may include modifying the environment by moving objects such as electrical cords or furniture to reduce tripping and falling. Stairways may need to be blocked off with a gate.

In some cases, short-acting tranquilizers have been helpful in reducing the incidence of sleepwalking.

For kids who sleepwalk often, doctors may recommend a treatment called scheduled awakening. This disrupts the sleep cycle enough to help stop sleepwalking. In rare cases, a doctor may prescribe medication to help someone sleep.

Prognosis:
Sleepwalking may or may not reduce with age. It usually does not indicate a serious disorder, although it can be a symptom of other disorders.

Prevention:
# Relax at bedtime by listening to soft music or relaxation tapes.
# Have a regular sleep schedule and stick to it.
# Keep noise and lights to a minimum while you’re trying to sleep.
# Avoid the use of alcohol or central nervous system depressants if prone to sleepwalking.
# Avoid fatigue or insomnia, because this can instigate an episode of sleepwalking.
# Avoid or minimize stress, anxiety, and conflict, which can worsen the condition

Statistics:-

* Eighteen percent of the world’s population is prone to sleepwalking.
* Somewhere between 1% and 16.7% of U.S. children sleepwalk, and juveniles are more prone to the activity.[citation needed]
* One study showed that the highest prevalence of sleepwalking was 16.7% for children of 11–12 years of age.[citation needed]
* Males are more likely to sleepwalk than females.[citation needed]

Activities such as eating, bathing, urinating, dressing, driving cars, whistling, and committing murder have been reported or claimed to have occurred during sleepwalking. Contrary to popular belief, most cases of sleepwalking do not consist of walking around (without the conscious knowledge of the subject). Most cases of somnambulism occur when the person is awakened (something or someone disturbs their SWS); the person may sit up, look around and immediately go back to sleep. But these kinds of incidences are rarely noticed or reported unless recorded in a sleep clinic.[citation needed]

Sleepwalkers engage in their activities with their eyes open so they can navigate their surroundings, not with their eyes closed and their arms outstretched, as often parodied in cartoons and films. The subject’s eyes may have a glazed or empty appearance, and if questioned, the subject will be slow to answer and may be unable to respond in an intelligible manner.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

Resources:

http://www.medicinenet.com/sleepwalking/article.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleepwalking
http://kidshealth.org/kid/stay_healthy/body/sleepwalking.html

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