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Taxus canadensis

Botanical Name: Taxus canadensis
Family: Taxaceae
Genus: Taxus
Species: T. canadensis
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Pinophyta
Class: Pinopsida
Order: Pinales

Common Names:Canada yew or Canadian yew.

Habitat : Taxus canadensis is native to central and eastern North America, thriving in swampy woods, ravines, riverbanks and on lake shores. Locally called simply “yew”, this species is also referred to as American yew or ground-hemlock.
Description:
Taxus canadensis is usually a sprawling an evergreen conferious Tree growing to 1.5 m (5ft) by 1.5 m (5ft) at a slow rate. It sometimes forms strong upright central leaders, but these cannot be formed from spreading branches, only from the original leader of the seedling plant. The shrub has thin scaly brown bark. The leaves are lanceolate, flat, dark green, 1–2.5 cm long and 1.5 mm broad, arranged in two flat rows either side of the branch.

The seed cones are highly modified, each cone containing a single seed partly surrounded by a modified scale which develops into a soft, bright red berry-like structure called an aril, open at the end. The seeds are eaten by thrushes, waxwings and other birds, which disperse the hard seeds undamaged in their droppings. The male cones are globose, 3 mm diameter. It is a monoecious plant – one of the few in the genus.
It is not frost tender. It is in leaf 12-Jan, and the seeds ripen from Sep to November. The flowers are monoecious (individual flowers are either male or female, but both sexes can be found on the same plant) and are pollinated by Wind.The plant is not self-fertile.

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Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very acid and very alkaline soils.

It can grow in full shade (deep woodland) semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers dry or moist soil. The plant can tolerates strong winds but not maritime exposure. It can tolerate atmospheric pollution.
Cultivation:
Thrives in almost any soil, acid or alkaline, as long as it is well-drained. Plants are very shade tolerant. This species is the most cold-hardy member of the genus – dormant plants will tolerate very heavy frosts though the young growth in spring can be damaged by a few degrees of frost. The plants produce very little fibrous root and should be planted in their final positions when still small. Plants in this genus are notably resistant to honey fungus. Dioecious. Male and female plants must be grown if seed is required. Other reports say that this species usually has monoecious flowers (separate male and female flowers, but both borne on the same plant).

Propagation:
Seed – can be very slow to germinate, often taking 2 or more years. It is best sown as soon as it is ripe in the autumn when it should germinate 18 months later. Stored seed may take 2 years or more to germinate. 4 months warm followed by 4 months cold stratification may help reduce the germination time. Harvesting the seed ‘green’ (when fully developed but before it has dried on the plant) and then sowing it immediately has not been found to reduce the germination time because the inhibiting factors develop too early. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots once they are large enough to handle and grow them on in pots in a cold frame. The seedlings are very slow-growing and will probably require at least 2 years of pot cultivation before being large enough to plant out. Any planting out is best done in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Cuttings of half-ripe terminal shoots, 5 – 8cm long, July/August in a shaded frame. Should root by late September but leave them in the frame over winter and plant out in late spring. High percentage. Cuttings of ripe terminal shoots, taken in winter after a hard frost, in a shaded frame.

Edible Uses:
Fruit – raw. Very sweet and gelatinous, most people find it delicious though some find it sickly. The fruit is a fleshy berry about 8mm in diameter and containing a single seed. All other parts of this plant, including the seed, are highly poisonous. When eating the fruit you should spit out the large seed found in the fruit’s centre. Should you swallow the whole seed it will just pass straight through you without harm, if the seed has been bitten into, however, it could cause some problems.
Medicinal Uses :
The Canadian yew is a very poisonous plant, though it was employed medicinally by several native North American Indian tribes who used minute amounts of the leaves both internally and externally in order to treat a variety of complaints including rheumatism, fevers, influenza, expelling afterbirth and dispelling clots. Modern research has shown that it contains the substance ‘taxol’ in its shoots and bark. Taxol has shown exciting potential as an anti-cancer drug, particularly in the treatment of ovarian cancers. This remedy is very toxic and, even when used externally, should only be used under the supervision of a qualified practitioner. See also the notes above on toxicity. The plant is abortifacient, analgesic, antirheumatic, antitumor, diaphoretic, diuretic, emmenagogue, febrifuge and pectoral.

Other Uses :.…Dye……A green dye can be obtained from the leaves.

Known Hazards : All parts of the plant, except the flesh of the fruit, are highly poisonous.
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taxus_canadensis
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Taxus+canadensis

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Alkali Seaheath

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Botanical Name : Frankenia salina
Family: Frankeniaceae
Genus: Frankenia
Species: F. salina
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Caryophyllales

Common Names:alkali heath or alkali seaheath

Habitat ;Alkali Seaheath   is native to California. It is occasionally found in Nevada and Mexico, but its range is limited. It is uncommon even in the region where it is most likely to be found, just north of the San Francisco Bay Area.

Description:
It is a squat flowering bush that forms a twiggy thicket near beaches and coastal salt marshes. Its common name refers to its preference for alkaline soils, a halophyte. It has the ability to excrete salt as an adaptation for living in saline habitats. The flowers are pink or fuchsia in color.

You may click to see the pictures:

Frankenia salina 

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Frankeniasalina2   

Frankeniasalina3  

Medicinal Uses:
Used both internally and by injection or spray, for catarrhal diseases and other discharges from the mucous membranes, diarrhea, vaginal leucorrhea, gonorrhea, and gleet, and the different types of catarrh.  The tea is a reliable astringent to reduce inflammation of the alimentary tract, from mouth sores to the intestines, relieving diarrhea and soothing piles and hemorrhoids.  It is an effective douche for vaginal inflammation.

 

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_AB.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankenia_salina
http://www.blm.gov/ca/st/en/fo/bakersfield/Programs/atwell_island/atwellplantlist/frankenia_salina.print.html
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Frankenia_salina

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Six Parenting Myths

Here are six parenting myths condensed from the book by John Rosemond entitled “The Six Point Plan For Raising Happy Healthy Children.”

1. Children should come first. Parents in today’s society coddle their children and place children even ahead of their marriage and literally spoil them rather than let the children have free time to play and be creative and simply be children.

2. The family is a democracy. He feels that the family is not a democracy and that ultimately the parent must be the boss and make decisions. He feels it is ok to say “because I say so”, or “because I’m the parent and making decisions is my responsibility.”

3. Housework is for parents only. He feels that all children should have chores around the house from the time they are three years old and by eighteen should be able to run a home.

4. Frustration is bad for children. He feels that children need a regular dose of vitamin “n” or the word “no” in response to requests for every thing material that American children have come to expect.

5. The more toys kids have the better. Children with the most toys tend to be the most bored children and lose appreciation for most toys. Parents feel their kids need the latest toys for their self esteem but actually they would be much better off playing with rocks, pine cones, boxes and paper bags and using their imagination.

6. My kids don’t watch too much TV. The average American preschool child watches 28 hours of TV a week which does many harmful things to them including inhibiting their imagination, curiosity, motivation, reasoning and attention span. Perhaps the apparent high increase in school related problems and Attention Deficit Disorder may be partly connected to this heavy TV input in our young children’s lives in our society today.

In summary, Mr. Rosemond feels that common sense approach to be refreshing. To reemphasize a few points: parents can best help their children by giving them time, not toys; by controlling T.V.; and by teaching them responsibility through chores.