Tag Archives: BERRY

Trichodesma Indicum

Botanical Name: Trichodesma Indicum
Family: Boraginaceae
Subfamily: Boraginoideae
Genus: Trichodesma
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Boraginales

Common Names: Indian Borage • Hindi: Chhota Kalpa • Gujarati: Undhanphuli • Kannada: Katte tume soppu • Tamil: Kallutaitumapi • Telugu: Guvvagutti • Marathi: Chota Kalpa • Sanskrit: Adhapuspi

Names in different languages:
Hindi name- Andhahuli, Chotta kulpha , Hetmundiya, Ondhaphuli, Ratmandiya.
English name -Indian Borage
Gujarati name – Undhaphuli
Kannada name – Athomukhi , Kattetumbesoppu
Kashmiri name- Nilakrai, Ratisurkh
Malayalam name- Kilukkamtumpa
Marathi name – Chhotaphulya, Lahanakalpa, Pathari, Gaoza.
Punjabi name -Andusi, Kallributi, Nilakrai, Ratmandi.
Sindhi name- Goazaban
Tamil name- Kiluttaitumpai, Kallutaitumpai.
Telugu name- Guvvagatti.

Sanskrit Synonyms:
Andhaka Because of covering of flowers the flower seems to be absent.
Andha pushpaka Flower is opposed by leaf.
Avak pushpi Flower does not move when wind blows as it is covered by leaves.
Adhah pushpi Flowers which face downwards.
Adhoh mukha – Which face downwards
Amara pushpika Flowers are beautiful
Gandha pushpika Flowers having fragrance
Dhenu jihva Leaves resemble the tongue of cow
Romalu Leaves are hairy
Vashyanga Flower is under control of leaf
Shayalu- That which is always sleeping or not seen
Shata pushpa- That which has hundred flowers

Habitat : It is found throughout India, on roadsides and stony dry wastelands, upto 1,500 m.

Description: This is an erect, spreading, branched, annual herb, about 50 centimeters in height, with hairs springing from tubercles. It is a plant bearing bluish white colored flowers in the month August and which fruits in October. The leaves are stalkless, opposite, lanceolate, 2 to 8 centimeters long, pointed at the tip, and heart-shaped at the base. The flowers occur singly in the axils of the leaves. The sepal tube (calyx) is green, hairy, and 1 to 13 centimeters long, with pointed lobes. The flower tube is pale blue, with the limb about 1.5 centimeters in diameter, and the petals pointed. The fruit is ellipsoid, and is enclosed by the calyx. The nutlets are about 5 millimeters long, and rough on the inner surface.

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Chemical constituents:
The seed of the plant contains Linoleic acid, Oleic acid, Palmatic acid and stearic acid. The leaves contains Hexaconase, Ethylhexacosanoate, Ethylester and 21, 24- hexacosadienoic acid.

Ayurvedic Properties:
*Rasa (Taste) – Katu (Pungent), Tikta (Bitter)
*Guna (Qualities) – Laghu (Light for digestion)
*Veerya (Potency) – Ushna (Hot)
*Vipaka – – Katu (Undergoes Pungent taste after digestion)
*Karma (Actions) – Kaphavata shamaka (reduces vitiated kapha and vata dosha)

Medicinal uses: In herbal medicine jargon, it is thermogenic, emollient, alexeteric, anodyne, anti-inflammatory, carminative, constipating, diuretic, depurative, ophthalmic, febrifuge and pectoral. This herb is also used in arthralgia, inflammations, dyspepsia, diarrhoea, dysentery, strangury, skin diseases and dysmenorrhoea.

The herb is used for the treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, dysmenorrhea, snake poisoning and localized swelling.

 

Known Hazards: The plant is acrid, bitter in taste. No known adverse effect is reported after the use of this herb.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

 

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trichodesma
http://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Indian%20Borage.html

Trichodesma indicum: Benefits, Remedies, Research, Side Effects

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Prunus angustifolia

Botanical Name : Prunus angustifolia
Family: Rosaceae
Genus: Prunus
Species: P. angustifolia
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Rosales

Synonyms: Pruns chicasa.
Common Name : Chickasaw Plum, Watson’s plum, Hally Jolivette Cherry, Cherokee plum, Florida sand plum, sandhill plum, or sand plum

Habitat :Prunus angustifolia is native to South-eastern N. America – New York to Florida, west to Texas. It is usually found in sandy soils, occurring along fence rows, in pastures, fields, stream banks, sand dunes and disturbed sites, often forming thickets.

Description:
Prunus angustifolia is a deciduous Tree growing to 3 m (9ft 10in) at a medium rate. The tree is 15 to 20 feet wide in an irregular shape. It is “twiggy” in nature, and has a scaly, almost black bark. Its branches are reddish with thorn-like, small side branches. In February, March, April and May, small white flowers blossom, 8–9 mm wide, along with red plums, up to 25 mm long. The flowers have five white petals with reddish or orange anthers. The plums are cherry-like and tend to be quite tart until they fully ripen. They ripen in late summer. It requires low to medium amounts of water to grow, and dry, sandy or loose soil. It grows best in areas with regular sunlight or areas of partial shade. In sunny areas, it will be more dense and colonize thickly. In areas of partial shade, it will be thinner and less dense, and each plant will be more spread out. P. angustifolia is very difficult to distinguish from Prunus umbellata, with which it hybridizes easily.

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The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil. The plant can tolerates strong winds but not maritime exposure.

Cultivation: Thrives in a well-drained moisture-retentive loamy soil. Prefers some lime in the soil but is likely to become chlorotic if too much lime is present. Succeeds in sun or partial shade though it fruits better in a sunny position. Although it should be hardy in all parts of Britain, it grows better in the warmer areas of the country. A fast-growing but short-lived tree in the wild, it has become rather rare in a truly wild state, though it is often cultivated for its edible fruit in N. America. There are some named varieties. The fruit is not freely produced in British gardens. The flowers, which appear just before the leaves unfold, have a refreshing fruity scent. Most members of this genus are shallow-rooted and will produce suckers if the roots are damaged. This species suckers freely in the wild, often forming thickets. Plants in this genus are notably susceptible to honey fungus. Special Features: North American native, All or parts of this plant are poisonous, Attracts butterflies, Fragrant flowers, Blooms are very showy.

Propagation:  Seed – requires 2 – 3 months cold stratification and is best sown in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe. Sow stored seed in a cold frame as early in the year as possible. Protect the seed from mice etc. The seed can be rather slow, sometimes taking 18 months to germinate. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle. Grow them on in a greenhouse or cold frame for their first winter and plant them out in late spring or early summer of the following year. Cuttings of half-ripe wood with a heel, July/August in a frame. Softwood cuttings from strongly growing plants in spring to early summer in a frame. Layering in spring.
Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Fruit; Seed.

Fruit – raw, cooked or dried for later use. Large and thin-skinned with a soft juicy sweet pulp, it has a dlicious flavour and is very good eaten out of hand, whilst it can also be used in pies, preserves etc. The fruit is up to 18mm in diameter. Seed – raw or cooked.
Ripe fruits are slightly tart, but can be eaten or are sometimes made into jellies, desserts and preserves.
Do not eat the seed if it is too bitter – see the notes below on toxicity.
Medicinal Uses:
Although no specific mention has been seen for this species, all members of the genus contain amygdalin and prunasin, substances which break down in water to form hydrocyanic acid (cyanide or prussic acid). In small amounts this exceedingly poisonous compound stimulates respiration, improves digestion and gives a sense of well-being.
Other Uses:
Dye; Shelterbelt; Soil stabilization; Wood.

A green dye can be obtained from the leaves. A dark grey to green dye can be obtained from the fruit[168]. This species is sometimes used in shelterbelt planting. It has an extensive root system and often forms thickets, which make it useful for erosion control. Wood – heavy, rather soft, not strong. It weighs 43lb per cubic foot and is of little commercial value.

Landscape Uses:Border, Espalier, Standard, Specimen.

Because they bloom early in the spring, before many other plants bloom, and require very little maintenance, they are often used in horticulture for ornamental use. They are found along many highways, especially in the southern part of the United States. The fruit is eaten by various animals. It also provides cover for nesting sites. Because of its attractive bark, small leaves and thin branches, prunus angustifolia plant is also sometimes used for bonsai.

Known Hazards: Athough no specific mention has been seen for this species, it belongs to a genus where most, if not all members of the genus produce hydrogen cyanide, a poison that gives almonds their characteristic flavour. This toxin is found mainly in the leaves and seed and is readily detected by its bitter taste. It is usually present in too small a quantity to do any harm but any very bitter seed or fruit should not be eaten. In small quantities, hydrogen cyanide has been shown to stimulate respiration and improve digestion, it is also claimed to be of benefit in the treatment of cancer. In excess, however, it can cause respiratory failure and even death.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunus_angustifolia
http://www.pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Prunus+angustifolia

 

Rubus illecebrosus

 

Botanical Name: Rubus illecebrosus
Family: Rosaceae
Genus: Rubus
Subgenus: Idaeobatus
Species: R. illecebrosus
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Rosales

Synonyms :Rubus commersonii illecebrosus.Rubus rosaefolius coronarius.Rubus sorbifolius.

Common Name : Strawberry-Raspberry , Balloon berry

Habitat :Rubus illecebrosus is native to E. Asia – Japan. It grows in thickets and waste ground.

Description:
Rubus illecebrosus is a thorny deciduous shrub up to 150 cm (5 feet) tall. Leaves are pinnately compound. Flowers are produced either one at a time or in clumps of 2-3, each with 5 petals up to 18 mm (0.72 inches) long (longer than those of most related species). Fruits are also unusually large for the genus, each oblong, red, up to 2 cm (0.8 inches) long with 50–100 drupelets. It is not frost tender. It is in flower in July, and the seeds ripen in August. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects....CLICK & SEE THE  PICTURES
Cultivation:
Easily grown in a good well-drained loamy soil in sun or semi-shade. Sometimes cultivated for its edible fruit and occasionally naturalized in Europe. Plants spread freely when in a suitable site and are apt to become invasive. The plant adopts an almost herbaceous habit and is botanically a sub-shrub, only a small amount of woody stem persists overwinter. Plants in this genus are notably susceptible to honey fungus.

Propagation :
Seed – requires stratification and is best sown in early autumn in a cold frame. Stored seed requires one month stratification at about 3°c and is best sown as early as possible in the year. Prick out the seedlings when they are large enough to handle and grow on in a cold frame. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring of the following year. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in a frame. Tip layering in July. Plant out in autumn. Division in early spring or just before leaf-fall in the autumn

Edible Uses:

Fruit – raw or cooked. Fairly large and sweet but insipid raw. The fruit is said to develop more flavour when it is cooked. Another report says that the fruit is sour, bitter and unpalatable raw, though this does not agree with the plants we are growing. The fruit is about 30mm in diameter.
Medicinal Uses: None known

Other Uses: A purple to dull blue dye is obtained from the fruit. A good ground cover plant for a sunny position or light shade. It spreads freely once established, but dies down over the winter and thus can allow other species to invade

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubus_illecebrosus
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Rubus+illecebrosus

Fragaria ovalis

Botanical Name: Fragaria ovalis
Family: Rosaceae
Genus: Fragaria
Species: F. virginiana
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Rosales

Common Name : Rocky Mountain Strawberry

Habitat: Fragaria ovalis is native to South-western N. America. It grows in the coniferous forests in Arizona. Found at 2100 – 3300 metres in the Rockies.

Description:
Fragaria ovalis is a perennial plant, growing to 0.2 m (0ft 8in). It is not frost tender. It is in flower from Apr to May, and the seeds ripen from Jun to July. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects…...CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES
Cultivation:
Prefers a fertile, well-drained, moisture retentive soil in a sunny position. Tolerates semi-shade though fruit production will be reduced. Used in breeding programmes with F. x ananassa in order to convey winter hardiness and for producing ever-bearing and day-neutral varieties.

Propagation:
Seed – sow early spring in a greenhouse. The seed can take 4 weeks or more to germinate. The seedlings are very small and slow-growing at first, but then grow rapidly. Prick them out into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and plant them out during the summer. Division of runners, preferably done in July/August in order to allow the plants to become established for the following years crop. They can also be moved in the following spring if required, though should not then be allowed to fruit in their first year. The runners can be planted out direct into their permanent positions

Edible Uses:Fruits & leaves…..The fruit is eaten raw, cooked or used in preserves etc. Small but tasty. The fruit can also be dried for later use. The dried leaves are a tea substitute.

Medicinal Uses: Not Known

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virginia_strawberry
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Fragaria+ovalis

Fragaria chiloensis

Botanical Name: Fragaria chiloensis
Family: Rosaceae
Genus: Fragaria
Species: F. chiloensis
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Rosales
Synonyms : F. cuneifolia.

Common Name: Beach Strawberry, Pacific beach strawberry, Sandwich beach strawberry, Chilean strawberry, or coastal strawberry,

Habitat : Fragaria chiloensis occurs from S. America to N. America and also Hawai?i. Migratory birds are thought to have dispersed F. chiloensis from the Pacific coast of North America to the mountains of Hawai?i, Chile, and Argentina. It grow well in light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil. The plant can tolerates strong winds but not maritime exposure.

Description:
Fragaria chiloensis is a perennial evergreen plant growing to 15–30 centimetres (5.9–11.8 in) tall, with glossy green trifoliate leaves, each leaflet around 5 centimetres (2.0 in) long. The flowers are white, produced in spring and early summer. The fruit is edible, red on the surface, white inside.
It is not frost tender. It is in flower from Apr to May, and the seeds ripen from Jun to July. The flowers are dioecious (individual flowers are either male or female, but only one sex is to be found on any one plant so both male and female plants must be grown if seed is required) and are pollinated by Insects.The plant is not self-fertile.

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Cultivation:
Prefers a fertile, well-drained, moisture retentive soil in a sunny position. Tolerates semi-shade though fruit production will be reduced. Grows best near the coast. Plants like a mulch of pine or spruce leaves. Cultivated for its edible fruit in the Andes. This species, along with F. virginiana, is probably a parent of the cultivated strawberries. Dioecious. Male and female plants must be grown if seed is required.

Propagation:
Seed – sow early spring in a greenhouse. The seed can take 4 weeks or more to germinate. The seedlings are very small and slow-growing at first, but then grow rapidly. Prick them out into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and plant them out during the summer. Division of runners, preferably done in July/August in order to allow the plants to become established for the following years crop. They can also be moved in the following spring if required, though should not then be allowed to fruit in their first year. The runners can be planted out direct into their permanent positions.

Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Fruit. and as Tea…….Fruit – raw or cooked. Large, sweet and succulent with a delicate flavour. A delicious treat. The berries can be used to make jams, preserves etc. A tea can be made from the leaves.
Medicinal Uses:

Antiseptic; Astringent; Emmenagogue; Galactogogue; Odontalgic.

The plant is antiseptic, astringent, emmenagogue, galactogogue and odontalgic. It has been used to regulate the menstrual cycle. A poultice of the chewed leaves has been used to treat burns.

Other Uses :   Plants spread by means of runners and can be grown as a ground cover[
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fragaria_chiloensis
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Fragaria+chiloensis