Tag Archives: Infant formula

Breast Milk Storing

As a general rule milk can be stored at room temperature for 4-6 hours, in a refrigerator for up to 8 days, in a refrigerator freezer for up to 3 months and in a deep chest freezer for up to 6 mon or  12 months in a deep freezer. If you are using breast milk storage bags, be sure to get all the air out of the bag before sealing it to prevent freezer burn. Thawed breast milk must be used within 24 hours and must be refrigerated until use. Never refreeze breast milk.
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It’s very important to remember to chill your breastmilk before freezing it. Do NOT stick it directly into the freezer before it’s spent a few hours in the refrigerator.

The kind of storage you use for your milk comes down to how you plan to use it. If it’s stored for occasional use, meaning your baby is almost always getting nourishment straight from the breast, then using the plastic storage bags designed for breastmilk storage is fine. If your baby is generally being nursed from a bottle of expressed milk, as in a daycare situation, you may want to use glass bottles, as the live antibodies in breastmilk tend to stick less to the sides of glass then they do to plastic.

If you pump more in a single day you can add to your supply. If you already have milk from the same day in the freezer you can chill freshly expressed milk and add it directly to the bag that you’ve already frozen – this can only be done for same day expressions.

When warming frozen milk there is one major rule – NEVER put in on the stove or in the microwave! Microwaving destroys the antibodies in human milk and that’s one of the major reasons for breastfeeding in the first place. First thing is to remember to defrost the oldest milk first. Milk in glass bottles is best thawed in a bottle warmer. For milk stored in storage bags take it out of the second storage bag with the written information on it and either run it under warm tap water or place it in a bottle warmer.

Once your milk is warmed to the proper temperature you can pour it into the feeding bottle. Human milk is not homogenized so the fat does separate. NEVER shake human milk – always gently swirl it to mix it.

Milk thawed from the freezer can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours but remember to NEVER reuse milk that has already been in a bottle your baby has sipped off of. If you thaw 6 ounces of milk and pour 4 ounces into a bottle for baby, you can save the other 2 ounces in the refrigerator. But once the bottle has touched your baby’s lips you can only keep that milk for about an hour, due to the bacteria.

Freezing breastmilk kills some of the beneficial antibodies but is still better then formula feeding. Fresh breastmilk, either milk directly from the breast, freshly expressed or refrigerated is best, but frozen breastmmilk is still a safe and better choice for baby.


Resources:

http://www.ehow.com/how-does_5188825_long-breast-milk-stored-fridge_.html
http://www.helium.com/items/620559-how-long-breastmilk-can-last-in-the-freezer

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CDC and ADA Now Advise to Avoid Using Fluoride

It was 2007 when the American Dental Association (ADA) first warned that parents of infants younger than a year old “should consider using water that has no or low levels of fluoride” when mixing baby formula, due to concerns about fluorosis.

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Now the Journal of the American Dental Association has published a study that found increased fluorosis risk among infants who were fed infant formula reconstituted with fluoride-containing water, as well as used fluoridated toothpastes.

A new study in the Journal of the American Dental Association finds once again that, contrary to what most people have been told, fluoride is actually bad for teeth.

Exposure to high levels of fluoride results in a condition known as fluorosis, in which tooth enamel becomes discolored. The condition can eventually lead to badly damaged teeth. The new study found that fluoride intake during a child’s first few years of life is significantly associated with fluorosis, and warned against using fluoridated water in infant formula.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is of a similar opinion. According to their website:

“Recent evidence suggests that mixing powdered or liquid infant formula concentrate with fluoridated water on a regular basis may increase the chance of a child developing … enamel fluorosis.”

Resources:
Journal of the American Dental Association October 14, 2010; 141(10):1190-1201

CDC May 28, 2010

Which Infant Formulas Contain Hidden Toxic Chemicals?

Although artificial human milk is regulated by the FDA, researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that a thyroid-affecting chemical used in rocket fuel contaminated 15 brands of powdered infant formula — including two that accounted for 87 percent of market share in 2000. The top offenders included Similac and Enfamil.

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The International Formula Council blamed the perchlorate on the water used to make the formula rather than the powder. However, pre-mixed liquid formulas come with their own potential toxins, such as the chemical BPA.

And in China, 76 tons of melamine-tainted milk products were recently seized, just two years after melamine-adulterated formula killed six infants and hospitalized thousands more.

Mother Jones reports:

“For all these reasons the American Academy of Pediatrics remains less than sanguine about infant formula, recommending exclusive breastfeeding for six months and continued nursing ‘until at least the baby’s first birthday.’ Indeed, they credit mother’s milk with everything from breast cancer risk reduction to obesity prevention.”

Source: Mother Jones July 12, 2010

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Present Position of FDA About BPA Risks

In a shift of position, the U.S. FDA is expressing concerns about possible health risks from bisphenol A, or BPA, a widely used component of plastic bottles and food packaging. The agency declared BPA safe in 2008.

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But the FDA now has “some concern about the potential effects of BPA on the brain, behavior and prostate gland of fetuses, infants and children.”

The action is another example of the drug agency becoming far more aggressive in taking hard looks at what it sees as threats to public health over the past year. In recent months, the agency has stepped up its oversight of food safety and has promised to tighten approval standards for medical devices.

Concerns about BPA are based on studies that have found harmful effects in animals, and on the recognition that the chemical seeps into food and baby formula. Nearly everyone is exposed to BPA, starting in the womb.

Dr. Sharfstein said the drug agency was also re-evaluating the way it regulates BPA.

The substance is now classified as a food additive, a category that requires a cumbersome and time-consuming process to make regulatory changes. Dr. Sharfstein said he hoped its status could be changed to “food contact substance,” which would give the F.D.A. more regulatory power and let it act more quickly if it needed to do so.

Resources:
New York Times January 15, 2010
New York Times FDA Articles
New York Times May 14, 2009

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Formula Milk Not Very Inferior Than Breast Milk for Child’s Health

A new Norwegian study suggests that mothers finding it hard to breastfeed their newborns might have had higher levels of the male hormone An esoteric perspective: .

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The research also questions the health benefits of breast milk over formula.

Researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology studied 180 pregnant women to come up with their findings.

The group examined included women who were likely to give birth to small babies due to high levels of testosterone.

Even after considering factors like age, education and smoking, researchers found a direct relationship between low breastfeeding rates at three and six months and higher testosterone levels.

Reasons for high testosterone levels during pregnancy can be numerous after the placenta, the site of hormone production, comes into action.

And according to scientists testosterone may hamper the development of glandular tissue in the breast, thereby affecting breastfeeding ability.

“Basically a mother who finds she has difficulty shouldn’t feels guilty – it probably is just the way it is, and her baby will not suffer for being fed formula milk,” the BBC quoted lead researcher Professor Sven Carlsen, as saying. “A mother should do what makes her happy.”

Taking about the benefits of breast milk and formula milk he said: “These health differences are really not so significant in any event.

“When you look at the epidemiological studies and try to strip away the other factors, it is really hard to find any substantial benefits among children who were breastfed as babies.”

The study has been published in Acta Obstetricia and Gynacologica Scandinavica.

Source: The Times Of India

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