Tag Archives: Relative direction

Enhanced Bent-Over Row

Here’s a challenging variation of the traditional bent-over row that will strengthen your core and your upper body muscles. Remember to hold lighter dumbbells while you master the technique, then increase the weight once you’re comfortable finding your balance. Practice patience because this exercise is harder than it looks.

Stand upright grasping a 3-, 5- or 8-pound dumbbell in each hand, with your arms hanging below your shoulders. Slowly begin to tilt your torso forward, bending at the hips. Bend your right knee slightly and shift your body weight off your left leg. Find your balance with just your left toes touching the floor behind you. Concentrate on keeping your shoulders, chest and hips facing squarely toward the floor.

When you feel ready, begin to raise your left leg off the floor until it reaches hip level. At the same time, bend your elbows and bring the dumbbells to your hips. Pause. Continue to hold your leg up as you lower and raise your dumbbells eight to 12 times. Return to an upright position and repeat, this time balancing over your left leg while lifting your right leg.


Source
: Los Angeles Times

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Yoga to Beat Everyday Pressure

Yoga can relax your mind and body, ease stiff joints and muscles and make you feel good. It can also tone up your body and help you look great.

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Yoga trainer Yogesh Chavan prescribes the following asanas to handle everyday pressures on the body

Jalandhar Shuddhi Kriya
Under pressure, lactic acid accumulates around our neck. Exercising it frees up the nervous system since all the nerves branch out from the base of the neck.

Rotate your neck clock-wise and then anti-clockwise. Sit cross-legged on the floor. Drop the neck forward, chin should touch the chest, roll your face to your left, then drop your head back, roll to the right and come back to the starting position. Repeat in anti-clockwise. Repeat five to six times in each direction.

To relieve tired collar muscles, rest your hands on your thighs and roll your shoulders front to back and then back to front. Repeat five to six times.

Jathar Parivartanasan
The lower back feels the strain if you are on your feet, or sitting in the same posture for too long. Twisting it flexes the spine. Lie on your back and pull your knees up. Drop your knees to the left such that the left knee touches the floor and the right thigh and knee rests on it. Twist your head to your right side and your hands should be near your ears, and your mouth should be as if you’ve just yawned. Hold for a count of seven and then change directions. Repeat three times for each side. Then sit up for a short session of Pranayam

Pressure Point
The energy regeneration point is located on the middle of the inside of the right forearm. Press, roll and pump it with your left thumb to energise it.

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Hope for Clumsy Clods

Right handed or left? Worldwide, about 90 per cent of the people prefer to use their right hand for doing things. Not surprisingly, life in all cultures is geared to the right-handed individual. Implements like nuts and bolts are difficult to handle for the left-handed. Incidentally, “right” also means “correct”. The word “left” is derived from the Anglo-Saxonlyft” which means “weak” or “useless”.
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Our brains are wired for handedness. During the process of evolution, the centre for language moved to the left hemisphere in the majority of the people. The human brain functions such that the left and dominant hemisphere controls the right side of the body, making the majority (80 per cent) totally right-handed. The dominance does not extend to the use of the hand alone — such people are also are “right sided”. Their dominant eye, ear and leg are on the same side of the body.

Problems arise in 20 per cent of the population that doesn’t have a dominant hemisphere to determine laterality or handedness. Their brains are “cross wired”, giving them mixed handedness or laterality, cross dominance, mixed dominance or cross laterality. In short, the right hand may be matched with the left foot or the left hand with the right eye. This leads to confused, crossed signals in the brain when complex tasks are performed. The electrical and chemical signals have to criss-cross the midline before they eventually reach their final destination in the designated area of the brain. Therefore, such individuals are accident prone, and have things around them explode, collapse, catch fire or fall apart. Day-to-day objects are misplaced, and navigation from one place to another (with left to right confusion) — even along familiar roads — becomes a nightmare.

These adults evolved from clumsy children, who kept bumping into things and frequently fell down. Their bodies have scars and evidence of healed fractures. Their school projects get “excellent” for imagination and “zero” for execution. Life is difficult for people with mixed laterality. Career choices are affected, with professions like driving or piloting a plane remaining distant dreams.

People with mixed laterality alternate hands when writing and legs when kicking. They hold the telephone to the ear opposite to their writing hand. They subconsciously use one hand first and then the other to perform complex tasks. Earlier, such people were considered ambidextrous, but true ambidexterity is almost unknown.

The uncertainty also extends to the mental image of their own limbs or body surface. This causes an inability to rapidly execute commands to turn right or left. The march past becomes a formidable hurdle, with everyone doing a “right turn”, while the affected individual wanders off in the wrong direction. Hesitation is evident if they are asked to perform complicated tasks with alternating hands initiating the movement. Slowed reactions preclude split second decisions, causing frequent accidents. Also, people with mixed laterality do not perform well in track and field events. Their feet do not alternate quickly enough. Running is slow and uncoordinated. The good news, however, is that they excel in games involving a bat (such as hockey, cricket, tennis, badminton and table tennis). This is because the bat is held across the body on the dominant side.

Mixed laterality also has its advantages. The criss-crossing of brain signals uses and strengthens many normally unused brain synapses and pathways. Hence such people are exceptionally talented, creative and artistic. If portraits or photographs of some famous artists — such as Leonardo da Vinci and Rembrandt — are scrutinised, you will see that they may paint with one hand, while tilting the head to the other side and crossing the opposite leg. This demonstrates mixed laterality.

To check your laterality, figure out —

* Which hand you use to write, pick up objects or dial the telephone

* Which leg you use to kick or which is uppermost when your legs are crossed (this remains constant all through life)

* If you cannot hear clearly, to which side you tilt your head

* The side of your jaw you use to chew (this is also constant unless there is a dental problem)

If you have mixed laterality, it is possible to overcome the “defects” and strengthen both sides equally, in a way that it “compensates” for mixed laterality. These exercises, that require 10 repetitions, may be of help

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• While walking, clench and unclench your hands, alternating them with the foot you use to step forward (right hand and left foot)

• Standing on one leg at a time

• Close one eye first and then the other

• Close one ear at a time

• Doing yogic breathing through one nostril at a time.

If a child is “left” handed, that may be the “right” laterality for him or her. Punishment, ridicule or forceful correction messes up the brain connections. Desist from interference, or you might just have sabotaged the emergence of the next Einstein.

CLICK & SEE


Source:
The Telegraph (Kolkata, India)

Intuitive Guidance From Within

Using Yourself As A Pendulum
Learning to trust our intuition is something that can connect us with our higher selves. Sometimes it might not seem easy to do this. Our thoughts and minds often get in the way. But by accessing our innermost self, we will find that the information we receive is usually what we truly need at that moment. One of the techniques that allows us to really get in touch with our deepest font of wisdom is using our body as a pendulum. The simple act of letting our physical being lead us in a certain direction can offer us extremely deep insights and help us find the answers we seek.

Many of us may have tried using a pendulum or crystal on a chain as a dousing tool to acquire the information we need to make decisions or even find lost objects. Using our bodies puts us much more closely in tune with our being. The process of using your body as a pendulum is to ask your higher self a question and wait for your body to respond in either a forward-tilting or backward-tilting motion. The first step is to really understand how our higher self communicates with us by centering our bodies, asking ourselves the directions for “yes” and “no,” and noting which way our body moves. For a lot of people a forward motion is “yes,” and your body tilting backward is a “no” answer. It is easier to start with simple questions at first to understand how our higher self communicates with us. As we become more used to the messages we receive and how we process them, we can start asking for more specific things such as what dosage of herbs to take or which foods would best nour! ish our bodies. Using this technique in the grocery store or when shopping for vitamins and remedies can be extremely helpful.

Since we are always present in our bodies, understanding how we can use our bodies as pendulums is a tool we can use at any given moment in our lives. Letting our bodies tell us what is happening inside of us will in turn help to guide us through not just daily but also major life decisions. The more we allow our bodies to open up and share with us the connection it has with our deeper self, the better able we will be to truly access the knowledge we hold so deeply within.

Sources : Daily Om

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Side-Angle Yoga Postures

Step 1:->

Stand with your legs 4 to 5 feet apart. Turn your left foot out to the side and your right foot in slightly. Anchor each foot firmly to the ground. Keep your right leg straight and bend your left knee, lunging down until your hips are at knee level. Reach your right arm above shoulder level and reach your left arm to the floor in front of your left foot. Scoop your tailbone under your body and rotate your legs outward. Pull in your abs. Hold this position for three to four breaths, looking forward or up to the ceiling.

Step->2

Once your hips have loosened up and you are comfortable with the basic position, try this more challenging variation. Expand and rotate your chest up toward the ceiling as you lower your right arm behind your hips. Reach around with your right hand and try to grasp your left thigh. Without losing the rotation in your upper spine, raise your left arm off the floor, reaching out with your fingertips. Turn your gaze to the ceiling or look forward if doing so feels more comfortable for your neck. Hold this position for three to four breaths, then repeat on the other side.

Practice three sets and take little rest.

This postures boost strength and stability
Much of yoga is about practicing proper alignment and focus, so be precise when performing yoga postures. You should strive to feel centered while developing strength and stability in each pose. Here are two variations of a simple yoga move called the side angle. Stick with the first variation until you feel comfortable, then progress to the second.

Sources :Los Angles Times

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