Categories
Positive thinking

Honesty Is The Best

The Energy Of Honesty
As children most of us learn that honesty is better than dishonesty, and we may not question this beyond whether or not to do what we  are told. As adults, however, we can go deeper to examine our choices as investments of energy with predictable risks and returns. When we speak the truth, we affirm what already is. This is like using a paddle when the stream is already moving the same direction. We are already supported by the universe and its energy flow, so we don’t need to exert much energy, leaving more for other pursuits. But dishonesty redirects a portion of our energy against the flow, which requires extra effort. In addition, it creates an alternate reality that requires further energetic input to be maintained. So we can easily see that we are best served when we work with the flow of the universe…..click & see

Life is not always clearly defined, so we may find it useful to follow our choices to their logical conclusions. We may feel that little untruths are harmless, but they can be like small cracks that weaken an overall structure over time. Even giving someone a compliment or trying to protect them can create problems later when the alternate reality we have created becomes the basis for further actions. Even if the actions that follow are honestly done, the underlying unstable foundation of dishonesty will threaten to topple things eventually. This can lead to further energy being spent on keeping things hidden, working to remember the tales we have spun and fearing the consequences of being found out. Life doesnt need to be this draining, but we can make the choice to free ourselves from the bonds of dishonesty at any time.

Speaking and living our truth may involve risking, among other things, the possibility of rejection. But when we allow ourselves to follow the flow of life, we are supported. We can then use our energy to cultivate physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being and to create our dreams, rather than leaving ourselves too drained to even maintain our existence. Today we can make honesty our chooives to bring positive, lasting results.

Source:Daily Om

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Categories
Yoga

Dhanurasana -Type2(Yoga Exercise)

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In Sanskrit Dhanur means Bow.

Posture: In this Exercise the body is stretched more like a string of bow when pulled at the time of archery.
Technique of doing the exercise

click & see

Pre position : LIE  WITH BELLY ON THE FLOOR

1. Bend the left leg in knee and keep the foot on the thigh of right leg. Keep the right leg straight.
2. Hold the big toe of the left leg with right hand, hold it between the thumb and index finger and other 3 fingers to have a good grip of the thumb. Hold big toe of the right leg with left hand.
3. Exhale and inhaling start lifting the left foot with the right hand and pull it up to ear.&nbspKeep the trunk and neck erect and the sight fixed on the other end of the left hand.
4. Continue normal breathing.

Position : While trying to raise the foot up to ear, one tends to bend neck. But this is wrong, initially it may be difficult but it does not matter. Only care should be taken to keep the neck and trunk straight. Try to pull up the foot as much as possible.
Releasing Technique:

1. Inhale and exhaling, start bringing the foot down and place it on the thigh.
2. Restore the hands to their place.
3. Take the left foot to original position.

Duration : This asana exerts great strain and one can’t maintain it for long but with practice one can maintain it for up to 30 seconds.

Benefits:
In this asana great strain is exerted on hand, legs and joints of waist and the knees. Consequently the efficiency of the organs increases.

Precaution: One should avoid the temptation of attaining the ideal position if strain is unbearable.

Reference Book:- Yoga Pravesh

Categories
Exercise Healthy Tips

8 Secrets to Optimizing Your Exercise Plan

Simple ideas you can use to meet fitness goals in less time.
We’d be lucky if having the motivation to move was all it took to make exercise a part of our daily activities. When it comes to making motion an aim we often find ourselves face-to-face with the most persistent of obstacles. Here are some tips for conquering time when it threatens to bump exercise plans from your date book:

1. Book yourself.
Don’t have time for all this exercise? Sometimes it’s a matter of perception — other people’s. If coworkers, friends, or even family can’t understand why you take time for exercise but not for what they think is important, keep your priorities to yourself — but schedule your exercise in your date book. That way, when sticking to your guns on workouts, you can merely say you’re keeping a prior appointment.

2. Keep it interesting. Some people have a high tolerance for routine — and may even elevate it to ritual. But if your attention span is closer to monkey than monk, try to introduce variety into your workout on a regular basis. One way to do it: Change two things about your routine every week. It could be as simple as adding repetitions, resistance, or sets — or substituting one exercise for another. Change isn’t just an antidote to boredom, it allows you to continually challenge muscles in new ways, which makes you stronger faster.

3. Try slow motion. Want to try a difficult challenge that’s easy on joints? Lift a light weight only one time — but do it very slowly. Pick out a weight about half what you’d normally lift 10 times. Take 15 to 20 seconds to lift the weight, hold for another 15 to 20 seconds, then take another 15 to 20 seconds to bring it back down. The constant stress through the entire range of motion will work muscles in an entirely new way.

4. Judge gym transit time. Made the decision to join a health club? When choosing, follow the golden rule of gym location: Keep it within a 15-minute drive. Any farther and your chances of actually getting there for a workout drop considerably.

5. Spread the effort. If doing an entire full-body workout all at once is too fatiguing or demanding on your time, try doing only one part of the workout each day. If your workout has 12 exercises, for example, do the first three on Monday, the next three on Tuesday, and the rest on Wednesday. On Thursday, start the routine again. That way, you’re still doing each exercise three times during a one-week period without exhausting yourself with your routine.

6. Hold on to your gains.
While giving your muscles a chance to rest is important to making them stronger, there’s inevitably a point of diminishing returns when it comes to slacking off. How much rest is too much? A good rule of thumb is to expect about a 10 percent loss of your strength gains after about 10 days. The more training you’ve done, the slower your strength will decline. The bottom line: To maintain your gains, you need to keep exercising regularly.

7. Count backward. Problem: Strength exercises are no fun when the last repetitions are tough to do. Interpretation: If you’re challenging your muscles enough to want to quit, you’re probably doing them at just the right intensity. Mental trick: Your final repetitions will seem easier if you count backward from your target instead of forward from zero because you’ll be thinking about how few you have left, rather than how many you’ve already done.

8. Get off the floor safely. For exercises and stretches that require you to get on all fours, it’s easier to get back up again if you walk your hands back until you’re in a kneeling position, place one foot on the floor in front of you with your knee bent at about 90 degrees, then use your leg as a support for your hands as you stand or ease yourself into a chair.

From : The Everyday Arthritis Solution

Categories
Positive thinking

Redirecting The Eruption

Intense emotions demand intense modes of expression. While there are many outlets for the feelings typically deemed positive, however, there are far fewer methods for constructively coping with anger, frustration, fear, sadness, or stress. Consequently, such feelings can cause us to believe that we are no longer in control of our emotional state. Backed into a mental corner, we may lash out at the first individual we encounter. Most of us will quickly discover that our misdirected outpouring of fury has not relieved the pressure of our pain. Powerful emotions are like the lava in a volcano poised to erupt—held in check with nothing but an eroding layer of calm. Within us lies the power to direct the flood of feeling that surges forth by channeling it into productive, artistic, or laborious pursuits.

Retaking control of our emotions at their height can be difficult because our already negative feelings can convince us that others are deserving of our wrath. But if we consciously look for healthier ways of expressing what we feel, we can both safely dispel our pain and use the energy of that pain to add value to our lives. Anger and sadness, for example, can become the inspiration that induces us to dedicate ourselves to bringing about the change we wish to see in the world. If we act rather than react, we can become effective agents of positive transformation. When we channel our frustration or feelings of stress into outside-the-box thinking and proactive exploits, we are more apt to discover solutions to the issues that initially left us stymied. And if we view fear as a signal that we need to reexamine our circumstances rather than a cue to flee, we may gain new and unexpected insight into our lives.

Channeling your emotions into constructive action can also prevent you from engaging in cyclical rumination in which you repeatedly relive the situation, event, or expectation that originally sparked your feelings in your mind’s eye. Since you are focused on a goal, even if your ambition is merely to better understand yourself, your pain is no longer being fed by your intellectual and emotional energy and quickly ebbs away. You not only avoid lashing out at others, but you also actively take part in your own healing process while honestly acknowledging and honoring your feelings.

Source   :Daily Om

Categories
Yoga

Control your temper (Through Yoga)

Simple Yoga to Control Anger which harms you all the time:

The next time you get angry, think of yoga. Unless and until you learn the tricks of controlling your anger, you are likely not only to lose control over your life but also ruin your relationship with people who are close to you.

Anger is a very strong emotion. Technically, it is a response to some actual or perceived injury, about which we feel the need to retaliate immediately. It is a reaction to the non-fulfilment of something that we desire. In most cases, our ego comes to the forefront, which acts as a negative catalyst. Later on, after calming down, we regret this reaction and its consequences.

Anger is such an unbridled energy that it has the power to destroy reason and our ability to respond to a situation in an appropriately mature manner. We say things without really meaning to, only to repent later on for having said them, but very often the damage has already been done. Words, once uttered, cannot be withdrawn, and the reaction to anger is usually anger.

So a vicious cycle drags us into a vortex of negative reactions. An angry personality can be transformed significantly by following a yogic approach. Yoga helps us to harness this raw energy through a combination of asanas, pranayama, relaxation, diet, and regular reflection about attitudes and expectations.

Bhramari Pranayama  click to see

The best time for this pranayama is late at night  before you retire for the day, or early in the morning   when it is relatively silent outside. If you are extremely tensed up, you can do it for up to half-an-hour. However, it must be done sitting down. Once again, if you have heart ailments, avoid breath retention.



Advasana   click to see
Lie down on your stomach, with the forehead resting on the floor. The big toes should be touching each other and the heels should be allowed to flop to the sides. If you find difficulty in breathing, place a pillow under the chest.
Breathing: As you breathe naturally and without extra effort, notice the gentle rising and falling of the spinal column.

Surrender yourself to the floor and gradually start breathing longer and deeper. Try to breathe steadily. You can continue in this position for as long as you wish.
Benefits: This is a position of surrender and makes the mind calm down rapidly. If you have a short temper, this asana will help to a great extent. When you feel that you are on the verge of an emotional outburst, move away from the situation and lie down in advasana. Keep focusing on the incoming and outgoing breath rather than your agitated thoughts.
Shashankasana (Rabbit posture)
You can easily visualise an angry person, animal or bird, but you will find it very difficult to visualise an angry rabbit. This is what Shashankasana helps you to achieve.

Do this asana for a few minutes every day. If you find it difficult to bring your forehead to the floor, use a cushion for support. Keep the big toes together and the heels outwards and sit with the buttocks in the space between the heels. Try to settle down in this posture, allowing the spinal column to stretch fully. Continue sitting in this manner for a few minutes.

Breathing: Breathe in a relaxed and normal manner.

Sheetali Pranayama
Sit in any comfortable cross-legged posture, close your eyes and relax the body. Put your tongue out as much as possible and turn the sides of the tongue upwards, trying to bring the edges together to form a tube.
Breathing: Inhale deeply through this tube, draw in the tongue, close your mouth and then exhale through the nostrils. When you are inhaling through the tube, there should be a sound of air rushing in. Once again, open the mouth, form the tube, inhale, close the mouth and exhale through the nostrils. Continue this for one to two minutes.

During the summers, you can do this pranayama for a longer period.

WARNING: People with low blood pressure and respiratory tract disorders should avoid doing this asana. Those with heart diseases should not attempt breath retention.The best time for this pranayama is late at night   before you retire for the day, or early in the morning   when it is relatively silent outside. If you are extremely tensed up, you can do it for up to half-an-hour. However, it must be done sitting down. Once again, if you have heart ailments, avoid breath retention.

Nasikagra Drishti
This is an excellent practice for calming down an angry personality, but people suffering from depression should avoid doing this.
Sit in a comfortable meditative posture, with the head and spine upright. Place the hands on the knees in any mudra, close the eyes and allow the body to relax.
Open the eyes slightly and focus the gaze at the nose tip, without strain. If you are doing this correctly, you will see a double outline of the nose like an inverted V. Concentrate on the tip of the V-image and try not to allow the mind to wonder.

After a few seconds, gently close the eyes and let them relax for a while. This completes one round. Repeat the practice for five minutes.

Bhoochari Mudra
Sit in any comfortable meditative posture, head and spinal column upright and eye closed. Open the eyes and raise the right hand so that the elbow points outwards, the palm faces downwards and the thumb touches the top of the upper lip. A dark background helps.

click to see

Focus the gaze on the little fingertip and continue to gaze at it intently for as long as you can, without blinking. Lower the hand and continue to gaze at the place where the fingertip was, without blinking, for as long as you can. As you do this, remain aware of any thoughts that are passing through your mind. Try to observe them as a witness, without involvement.

Continue this practice for about five minutes.

Cool tips

 1. Talk less. Don’t get into arguments. Think objectively.
2. Try to see the flip side of life. Don’t take yourself too seriously.
3. Reduce the intake of foods such as meat, fish, eggs, onion, garlic, masoor dal, cauliflower, oily and spicy foods.
4. Whenever you feel that you are beginning to lose your temper, become silent and reflect on your expectations. Go for a brisk walk. Be patient.
5. Reflect upon the idea âs you cannot change the world, but you can change yourself if you want to try.

Source:The Telegraph-Calcutta India

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