Botanical Name: Psoralea corylifolia

syn. Cyamopsis psoralioides

Common name:
Babchi Seeds, Bavachi, Bavanchalu, Bavanchi Bavchi, Bhavanchi-vittulu, Bawachi, Bhavaj, Bobawachi, Bogi-vittulu, Hakuchi, Kantaka, Karpokarishi, Karu-bogi, Krishnaphala, Latakasturi, Somaraji, Sugandha kantak, Vabkuchi, Vakuchi,Babchi

Habitat: Bakuchi grows throughout the plains of central and east India. The black variety is commonly used  now a days.

Bakuchi is an evergreen small plant. It grows from 4 and 9 metres. They may live to one hundred years of age. The plant is variable in habit, usually upright to sprawling, and may intertwine with other species. The plant parasitises the roots of other tree species, with a haustorium adaptation on its own roots, but without major detriment to its hosts. An individual will form a non-obligate relationship with a number of other plants. Up to 300 species (including its own) can host the tree’s development – supplying macronutrients phosphorus, nitrogen and potassium, and shade – especially during early phases of development…Click & see

It may propagate itself through wood suckering during its early development, establishing small stands. The reddish or brown bark can be almost black and is smooth in young trees, becoming cracked with a red reveal. The heartwood is pale green to white as the common name indicates. The leaves are thin, opposite and ovate to lanceolate in shape. Glabrous surface is shiny and bright green, with a glaucous pale reverse. Fruit is produced after three years, viable seeds after five. These seeds are distributed by birds.
Cultivation :
The psoralea herb grows and thrives well in any average garden top soil. The plant however, prefers a well-drained soil and enough of sunlight. The psoralea plants are very sensitive in the sense that they cannot endure any disturbance of the root and hence it is advisable while the plants are still small they should be planted outdoors in their stable place. The psoralea enjoys a symbiotic or ‘give-and-take’ rapport with specific bacteria in the soil. These bacteria form lumps on the psoralea roots and attach the much need nitrogen for the plant from the atmosphere on the roots. The amount of nitrogen deposits in the nodules formed by the bacteria are so abundant that while the psoralea plants can utilize some of it, the remaining nitrogen can be used by plants growing in the vicinity.

The psoralea plant is propagated through seeds. The best season to grow the plant is from early to middle of spring. For effective propagation of this variety of climbing beans, soak the seeds in warm water for approximately 24 hours and then sow them early in a greenhouse. It is always better to sow the seeds in separate pots or containers as this will not require any relocation of the plant. Alternatively, the seeds may be sowed in one large pot and the seedlings removed as early as possible, as the psoralea plant cannot tolerate any root disturbance. Continue to grow them in the pots till they are suitable for planting in their permanent place in the outdoors. It may be remembered that it is virtually not possible to transplant this variety of the beans species without afflicting some damage to their roots. The psoralea plant requires a division during the spring. Utmost care should be adopted while undertaking the division process as the plant is averse to any kind of annoyance to its roots. Again, it must be mentioned here that it is almost unfeasible to do the division of the plant with 100 per cent success as there is bound to be some damage to the roots.

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Medicinal Uses:

Parts Used: Seeds
P. corylifolia contains a number of chemical compounds including flavonoids (neobavaisoflavone, isobavachalcone, bavachalcone, bavachinin, bavachin, corylin, corylifol, corylifolin and 6-prenylnaringenin), coumarins (psoralidin, psoralen, isopsoralen and angelicin) and meroterpenes (bakuchiol and 3-hydroxybakuchiol).

Very high concentrations genistein have been found in the leaves of Psoralea corylifolia.
The chief active principle of the seeds is an essential oil; and a fixed oil, a resin, and traces of a substance of alkaloidal nature.

P. corylifolia L., or Bu Gu Zhi in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is an herb used to tonify the kidneys, particularly kidney yang and essence. It is used for helping the healing of bone fractures, for lower back and knee pain, impotence, bed wetting, hair loss, and vitiligo.


Remedies For:
Aromatic, anthelmintic, antibacterial, antifungal, diuretic, diaphoretic, laxative, stimulant, aphrodisiac

Action & Uses in Ayurveda & Siddha:
Mathura tikta rasam, katu-vipakam, seetha veeryam, kapha-haram, rasayanam, ruksham, hrithyam, in meham, kushtam, jwaram, krimi, rakta-pittam.

Action & Uses in Unani:
Skin conditions, particularly leucoderma, anti-souda, balghami, fevers, anthelmintic, sedative for internal ulcers.

Five grams powder twice daily before meals with some coriander and honey (to taste); as an external paste.

Properties and Uses: Very powerful herb for variety of problems, such as: skin discoloration, veiling, baldness, conditions involving bilious affections, leprosy, leucoderma, antifungal and antiprotozoal, antitumor, enuresis, impotence, and frequent urination, improves hair and nails condition; tones liver, spleen, and pancreas;
it helps to overcome impotency,
frequent or involuntary urine. Have been used in India, China and Tibet both externally and internally.

A Top Herb for Leprosy, Skin Conditions

This herb has been considered by Ayurveda doctors to be so effective in the treatment of leprosy that it was given the name of ‘Kushtanashini’ (leprosy destroyers).

The powder from the seed is used to treat leprosy and leucoderma internally. It is also applied in the form of paste or ointment externally.

The unsaponified oil has been used with success in case of leucoderma and psoriasis.

It was shown to improve the color of skin (including removing white spots), hair, and nails. For instance, t

An ointment made by combining one part of an alcoholic extract of the seeds with two parts of chaulmugra oil and two parts of lanoline has been found to be effective in treating leucoderma, white leprosy, psoriasis, and other inflammatory skin diseases and febrile conditions. The oil can be used both internally or as a simple ointment externally. Gently rub the oil once or twice daily. The proportion of the active ingredients may be increased if needed.

The herb is also prescribed for
Seeds are also used to make a perfumed oil. They are also used for scorpion sting, and snake-bite.

Safety Precautions: May increase Pitta when taken alone; do not take with low body fluids; do not use with licorice root.

The essential oil varies enormously in its effects on different persons. With the majority (95 per cent) of people, it causes only redness of the leucodermal patches. But in a small number (5 per cent) there is extreme sensitiveness to the oil. It may even cause blistering of the skin. The strength of the oil should therefore be varied in such a way as not to allow its action to go beyond the state of redness of the leucodermic patches.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Source:Hollastic and

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