Tag Archives: Rheumatoid arthritis

Viola yezoensis

Botanical Name: Viola yezoensis
Family: Violaceae
Genus: Viola
Species: Viola yezoensis
Kingdom:  Plantae
Phylum:  Magnoliophyta
Class: Angiospermae
Category: Fabids
Order: Malpighiales

Common Names: Arrowhead Herb, English Name : Chinese violet. Japanese: Hikage-sumire, Chinese Name: Zi Hua Di Ding
Habitat :Viola yezoensis is native to E. Asia – China, Japan, Korea. It grows on grassy fields in lowland, C. and S. Japan. Broad-leaved forests, montane thickets, grasslands on mountain slopes.
Description:
Viola yezoensis is a perennial herb growing to 0.2 m (0ft 8in) by 0.2 m (0ft 8in).

It is in flower from Apr to May, and the seeds ripen from May to June. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects. CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay)

soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid and neutral soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist

Cultivation:
Prefers a cool moist well-drained humus-rich soil in partial or dappled shade and protection from scorching winds. Tolerates sandstone and limestone soils but becomes chlorotic if the pH is too high. Prefers a pH between 6 and 6.5. Plants are hardy to at least -15°c. All members of this genus have more or less edible leaves and flower buds, though those species with yellow flowers can cause diarrhoea if eaten in large quantities.

Propagation:
Seed – best sown in the autumn in a cold frame. Sow stored seed in early spring in a cold frame. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and plant them out in the summer. Division in the autumn or just after flowering. Larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions, though we have found that it is best to pot up smaller divisions and grow them on in light shade in a greenhouse or cold frame until they are growing away well. Plant them out in the summer or the following spring.
Edible Uses: Young leaves and flower buds – raw or cooked. When added to soup they thicken it in much the same way as okra. A tea can be made from the leaves.
Medicinal Uses:
Antiinflammatory; Antipyretic.

The whole plant is antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and depurative. It is used internally in the treatment of boils, carbuncles, snakebite, skin disorders, mumps etc. The plant is harvested when in flower and dried for later use.

The Chinese herb compound prescription Viola yedoensis Makino Anti-itching Compound (VYAC), which consists of Viola yedoensis Makino, herb, Sophora flavescens Aiton, root, and Dictamnus dasycarpus Turcz, root and rhizome, has been traditionally used to treat various skin allergic inflammatory diseases in clinic.

Clears toxins, reduces inflammation and is antibacterial. Internally for boils, carbuncles, snakebite, skin disorders (especially erysipelas), mumps, and hot disorders with inflammation of the eyes, throat, or ears.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
https://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Viola_yezoensis
http://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Viola+yezoensis
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_UZ.htm
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378874116303026
https://gd.eppo.int/taxon/VIOYZ

..http://herbpathy.com/Uses-and-Benefits-of-Viola-Yedoensis-Cid5348

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Episcleritis

Definition:
Episcleritis is irritation and inflammation of the episclera, a thin layer of tissue covering the white part (sclera) of the eye. It occurs without an infection.
click  for  photo
Episcleritis is an inflammatory condition affecting the episcleral tissue between the conjunctiva (the clear mucous membrane lining the inner eyelids and sclera) and the sclera (the white part of the eye) that occurs in the absence of an infection. The red appearance caused by this condition looks similar to conjunctivitis, but there is no discharge. There is no apparent cause, but it can be associated with an underlying systemic inflammatory or rheumatologic condition such as rosacea, lupus or rheumatoid arthritis.

click for photos.>...(001)...…(01)...(1)...(2)……...(3)..

It may also be associated with conditions such as gout and herpes simplex infection, so when episcleritis occurs it’s important to make sure these conditions aren’t a factor.

On rare occasions, it may become apparent that external substances, such as chemicals, are responsible for an attack.

Episcleritis is more likely to affect people in their 30s and 40s, and women are more likely to be affected than men.

Symptoms:
Typical symptoms include generalized or local redness of the eyes that may be accompanied by mild soreness or discomfort but no visual problems.

In general the symptoms are:
•A pink or purple color to the normally white part of the eye
•Eye pain
•Eye tenderness
•Sensitivity to light
•Tearing of the eye

When someone develops episcleritis, their eye (or eyes) appears red and may feel sore, tender and uncomfortable. In this respect, it’s similar to conjunctivitis (inflammation of the conjunctiva, which covers the episclera). But unlike conjunctivitis, episcleritis doesn’t cause a discharge, although watering may occur. Those affected may also find they become sensitive to bright light.

It comes in two forms: simple and nodular.

Simple episcleritis is characterised by intermittent bouts of inflammation that occur every couple of months and last between one and two weeks.

Some people report that these bouts are more likely to affect them in the spring and autumn, and although triggers often remain unidentified, some people find that stress or hormonal changes kick off the process.

Click to see the picture

Nodular episcleritis causes longer bouts of inflammation that are more painful than simple episcleritis. This type is more often associated with underlying medical conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis.

Causes:
Episcleritis is a common condition that is usually mild.

The cause is usually unknown, but it may occur with certain diseases, such as:

*Herpes zoster
*Rheumatoid arthritis
*Gout
*Sjogren syndrome
*Syphilis
*Tuberculosis
*Herpes simplex infection
*Inflammatory bowel disease and Lupus.

Diagnosis:
Diagnosis of episcleritis is made clinically. A work-up may be needed in some cases to uncover a possible underlying medical condition.

Treatment:
The condition usually disappears without treatment in 1 – 2 weeks,  but topical or oral anti-inflammatory agents maybe prescribed to relieve pain or in chronic/recurrent cases. Corticosteroid eye drops may relieve the symptoms faster.
You may Click to see:Alternative Treatment of  Episcleritis

Prognosis: Episcleritis usually improves without treatment. However, treatment may make symptoms go away sooner.

Possible Completions:
In some cases, the condition may return. Rarely, irritation and inflammation of the white part of the eye may develop. This is called scleritis. Episcleritis, is associated with an underlying disorder about 70% of the time, and Scleritis can produce serious damage to the Eye; Episcleritis never does.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

Resources:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/physical_health/conditions/episcleritis1.shtml
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001019.htm
http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/wilmer/conditions/episcleritis.html
http://lmk23.tripod.com/episcleritis.html

This Simple Habit May Actually Reduce Cancer and Diabetes by 50%

It is Vitamin D that influences more than 200 genes. This includes genes related to cancer and autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis.

………

Vitamin D affects your DNA through the vitamin D receptors (VDRs), which bind to specific locations of the human genome.

Reuters reports:

Vitamin D deficiency is a well-known risk factor for rickets, and some evidence suggests it may increase susceptibility to autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis and type 1 diabetes, as well as certain cancers and even dementia.”

Resources:
Reuters August 23, 2010

Genome Research August 23, 2010; [Epub ahead of print]

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Some Health Quaries & Answers

 


Exercising with arthritis :-

Q: I am 50 and have had rheumatoid arthritis for 10 years. It flares up intermittently no matter what treatment I follow. My knee joints are also affected and I am not able to go for a walk. Can I use a treadmill?

A: Rheumatoid arthritis relapses and remits on its own, without any dietary indiscretion or obvious aggravating factor. Follow your doctor’s advice. Sometimes he may suggest low-dose maintenance therapy with medication to prevent relapses. Apply moist heat to the joints regularly and then do passive exercises. In addition, you must do some active exercises. A non-weight bearing reclining stationary exercise cycle is a good alternative.

Addicted to porn:-
Q: I am a 30-year-old man working in a multinational company. At times I am the only one there at night and on holidays. I have begun watching pornography on the Internet. I enjoy it so much that I sometimes switch to these sites even during work hours when no one is watching. Is this an addiction?

 

A: Pornography is addictive and is now classified with drugs, alcohol and the like. It can escalate like drugs and alcohol and needs to be overcome. There are several sites that offer stepwise programmes to help you. Physical activity is often therapeutic. Try running or jogging an hour a day before or after work. Addiction to exercise is something you do not have to hide or be ashamed of.

Health drinks:-
Q: I am overweight and exercise in a gym. My personal trainer has been suggesting health drinks after the workout to replace lost calories, protein and electrolytes. Is this needed?

A: You need to replace the electrolytes lost if you sweat profusely during the exercise. This can be done cheaply, naturally and effectively by drinking lightly salted buttermilk, lime juice or tender coconut water. For the lost potassium, you can eat a small yellow banana. Don’t take health drink supplements. The ones available locally may be containing harmful chemicals.

It you are exercising to lose weight, why do you want to replace the calories you worked off?

TV all day:-
Q: My five-year-old grandson can’t recognise or remember alphabets and numbers. He is a TV addict and watches children’s programmes the whole day. He does not look in the eye while talking to strangers, but is quite articulate with relatives. He eats and sleeps normally but is thin. Is it attention deficit syndrome or something more serious?

A: Perhaps someone should take an interest in the child and make him more physically active. Heneeds to play outside in fresh air for two hours after school. It’s no use telling him to “go and play”. A parent (or grandparent) may be by his side to encourage him. Perhaps you could enroll him in a martial arts class, or coaching for football or cricket. He may do homework from 6pm to 8pm. If the school has not given any homework, you could give him some work with alphabets, colouring and numbers. Tell him firmly that the TV works only once a week, on Saturdays. I don’t think anything is wrong with him as yet. But if he continues thus, his personality may soon be permanently affected.

Vanishing voice:-
Q: I am a teacher. Sometimes, as I speak, my voice suddenly becomes softer and even disappears.

A: Constant speech can cause thickening of the vocal cords. At times, small nodules may also form there. You need to get the condition evaluated by an ENT surgeon. In the meantime, try not to speak unless absolutely essential. You may also try steam inhalations.

Source : The Telegraph ( Kolkata, India)

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Arthritis Patients Benefit from Weight Training

A regular and systematic  weight-training regimen may help treat rheumatoid arthritis patients. A study of 28 patients found that weight training led to improvements in basic physical function, such as   lifting, carrying, walking, climbing stairs

Researchers said such high intensity exercising could play a key role in managing the condition.

BBC News reports:
“RA is mainly a disease affecting the joints, but a less well known symptom is that it also severely reduces muscle mass and strength and this occurs even among patients whose disease is well managed …

They found physical function improved by between 20 percent to 30 percent in the group doing weight training. Strength also increased by nearly 120 percent.”

Sources:
BBC News August 4, 2010
Arthritis and Rheumatism December 2009; 61(12):1726-34.