Tag Archives: Inflorescence

Panax japonicus

Botanical Name : Panax japonicus
Family: Araliaceae
Subfamily: Aralioideae
Genus: Panax
Species: Panax japonicus

Synonyms : P. pseudoginseng japonicus (C.A.Mey.)Hoo.&Tseng. P. repens. Max.

Common Names: Japanese Ginseng

Habitat :Panax japonicus is native to E. Asia – China, Japan. It grows in forests, forests in valleys; 1200-3600 m. S Anhui, N Fujian, Gansu, Guangxi, Guizhou, Henan, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi, Shaanxi, Shanxi, Sichuan, Xizang, Yunnan, Zhejiang [Bhutan, N India, Japan, Korea, Myanmar, Nepal, NE Thailand, Vietnam].
Description:
Panax japonicus is a perennial herb growing to 0.6 m (2ft). Rootstock horizontal, flagellate or moniliform. Stem straight, glabrous. Leaves 3-5, verticillate at apex of stem, palmately compound; petiole base without stipule or stipulelike appendages; leaflets 5, obovate-elliptic to narrowly elliptic, 5-18 × 2-6.5 cm, membranous, both surfaces sparsely setose on veins, base broadly cuneate to subrounded, margin serrulate or biserrate, apex acuminate or long acuminate. Inflorescence a solitary, terminal umbel 50-80(or more)-flowered; peduncle 12-21 cm, glabrous or slightly pubescent; pedicels 7-12 mm. Filaments shorter than petals. Ovary 2-5-carpellate; styles 2-5, united to middle. Fruit red, subglobose, 5-7 mm in diam.; seeds 2-5, white, triangular-ovoid, 3-5 × 2-4 mm. Flower in. May-Jun and fruit in Jul-Sep….CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs)Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in full shade (deep woodland) or semi-shade (light woodland). It prefers moist soil.
Cultivation:
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in much of the country. This species has 24 chromosomes which makes it quite distinct from P. ginseng which has 44 chromosomes. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Requires a moist humus rich soil in a shady position in a woodland.

Propagation:
Seed – sow in a shady position in a cold frame preferably as soon as it is ripe, otherwise as soon as the seed is obtained. It can be very slow and erratic to germinate. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow them on in a shady position in the greenhouse or frame for at least their first winter. Make sure the pots are deep enough to accommodate the roots. Plant out into their permanent positions in late summer. Division in spring.

Edible Uses:…. Tea……The roots are used as a flavouring in teas and liqueurs. Some caution is advised, see the notes below on toxicity.

Medicinal Uses:

Expectorant; Febrifuge; Stomachic; Tonic.

Expectorant, tonic. A decoction of the root is expectorant, febrifuge and stomachic.

Other Uses: …Soap…..The root contains up to 5% saponins and it might be possible to utilize them as a soap.

Known Hazards: The root contains up to 5% saponins. Saponins are found in many foods, such as some beans, and although they are fairly toxic to people they are poorly absorbed by the body and most pass straight through without any problem. Thorough cooking will also break them down. Saponins are much more toxic to some creatures, such as fish, and hunting tribes have traditionally put large quantities of them in streams, lakes etc in order to stupefy or kill the fish.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
https://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Panax_japonicus
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Panax+japonicus
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=200015247

Spiranthes spiralis

Botanical Name : Spiranthes spiralis
Family: Orchidaceae
Genus:     Spiranthes
Species: S. spiralis
Kingdom: Plantae
Order:     Asparagales

Synonyms : Spiranthes autumnalis
Spiranthes is the Greek word for twisted, spiralis is Latin for twisted or spiral.Both refer to the inflorescence.

Common Names:Lady’s Tresses, Autumn lady’s-tresses

Habitat : Spiranthes spiralis grows on   dry, hilly fields all over Europe – towards the Caucasus.
Spiranthes spiralis is a palearctic orchid which in Europe blooms in August and September. It is characterised by a spiral inflorescence produced after the leaves have died down. The inflorescence can be very small (as little as 50 millimetres or 2.0 inches high) especially in short grazed grassland. In Western Europe it occurs most frequently in close cropped grassland overlying chalk or limestone.

Description:
Spiranthes spiralis is a short tuberous perennial which reaches heights between 5 and 30 centimeters. The stem is stickily-hairy.The plant has two tubers as storage organs, rarely, one or three. From Autumn two new tubers are formed and the old tubers lowly die off. The shiny oval-elliptical foliage leaves form a basal rosette close to the ground and to one side of the flower-spike. There are from three to seven and they have a length of 1.5 to 3.5 cm and a width of 1 to 1.5 cm. The leaves are often withered by flowering time. The stem leaves are scale-like and overlapping;the bracts are shorter than the flowers.
CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES
The flowers are white, 6-7mm long. There are up to 20 borne in a slender spiral 3 to 12 cm long.The outer 2 sepals are spreading, the upper sepal and the petals fuse to form a tube with the lip. The lip has up-curved edges and is yellowish-green. The edge of the lip is notched and appears viewed up close as frayed.

Medicinal Uses:
A tincture of the root is used in homeopathy for skin affections, painful breasts, pain in the kidneys and eye complaints. click & see 

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/l/ladtru07.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spiranthes_spiralis

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Anubing

Botanical Name :Artocarpus cumingiana Trec.
Family  : Moraceae

Other Scientific name
:Artocarpus ovata Blanco
Common names :Anobion (Pamp.) ,Kamandag (Neg.) ,Anobling (Tag.), Kanabling (Bik.)  Anobung (Tag.),Kanet (Tag.) , Anubing (Tag., Bik., Bis.), Kanubling (Bik.) ,Anubling (Tag.) Koliung (Ting.) Bayuko (P. Bis.), Kubi (Bis., Tag.) ,Buriuas (Tagb.), Obien (Ilk.) Indang (Tag.) Tugap (Neg.) ,Kalauahan (Bon.)

Habitat :Species found only in the Philippines. In forests at low and medium altitudes.

Description :
This is a tree reaching a height of 30 meters and a diameter of about 100 cm. Leaves are oblong or subelliptic, 20 to 30 cm long, and 6 to 10 cm wide, hairy, pointed or slightly heart-shaped at the base. Petioles are 1 to 2 cm long. Male spikes are pear-shaped and 1 to 2 cm long. Female heads are rounded and nearly 2 cm in diameter. The fruit is about 10 cm long, with the anthocarp extending into brownish, hairy appendages or tails. The seeds are ellipsoid and embeded in whitish, more or less gummy meat.

click to see the pictures

Medicinal Uses:
Parts used: Bark


Folkloric

• Bark is boiled and used for stomach aches.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:

http://www.stuartxchange.com/Anubing.html

http://www.indi-journal.info/archives/1883

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Blazing Star (Chamaelirium luteum)

Botanical Name :Chamaelirium luteum
Family: Melanthiaceae
Genus: Chamaelirium
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Liliales
Species: C. luteum
Synonyms : C. carolinianum. Helonias dioica. H. lutea. Veratrum luteum.
Common Names : False Unicorn Root , Blazing-Star, Devil’s Bit, Fairy Wand, False Unicorn.
Parts Used:
Dried rhizome and root

Habitat : Native to the eastern United States.It can be found in a variety of habitats, including wet meadows and deciduous woodlands.Low moist ground in meadows, thickets and rich woods.

Description:
Chamaelirium is a perennial herb .  Chamaelirium luteum has a basal rosette of around six 8-15cm leaves, from which a single spike-like raceme inflorescence (1-1.5cm diameter, 8-30cm length) emerges. The plants are generally dioecious, with male-biased gender ratios in a given population. This is due to higher mortality of female plants, and the tendency of female plants to flower less frequently. Female stalks tend to be taller, giving a total maximum plant height of about 12dm, but also tend to have about ten times fewer flowers. C. luteum is the only member of its monotypic genus, and is quite rare at the fringes of its range.

Flower/fruit: Small white flowers are tightly clustered on a spike or raceme; turns yellow with age; 4 to 8 inches long; located on end of 8 to 18 inch stem; male and female flowers on separate plants; male raceme often curves downward .
CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES
Flowering Season: Early summer .

Foliage: 3 to 8 inch evergreen basal leaves are smooth, narrow, lanceolate and form a rosette; stem leaves are narrower .

Cultivation :
Requires a moist fertile humus-rich acidic soil in sun or light dappled shade. Prefers a cool peaty soil. Plants are dioecious, male and female plants must be grown if seed is required.

Propagation  :
Seed – sow as soon as it is ripe just below the surface of a peat/sand mix in pots in a cold frame. Keep cool and moist. Germination usually takes place within 1 – 6 months at 10°c. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in pots plunged in a nursery bed for 1 – 2 years, giving protection from severe weather. Plant out in spring when the plants are large enough. Division.

Active Compounds:   Saponins; the glycosides chamaelirin and helonin, based on diosgenin.


Medical Uses:

A treasured woman’s botanical, false unicorn root’s gently curved root, which resembles a unicorn’s horn may be the source of its most common name. Used by Native American women to deter miscarriage, it is still widely used to treat a variety of problems unique to the female reproductive system. The root contains steroidal saponins which are precursors of estrogen.Steroidal saponin-containing herbs may normalize the luteal phase in women, making them useful for infertility which is associated with failure to ovulate.

Remedies For:

Uterine tonic, diuretic, anthelmintic, anti-inflammatory, emmenagogue.

This herb, used by the North American Indians, is one of the best tonics and strengtheners of the reproductive system that we have. Though primarily used for the female system, it can be equally beneficial for men. It is known to contain precursors of the estrogens. However, it acts in an amphoteric way to normalize function.

The body may use this herb to balance and tone and thus it will aid in apparently opposite situations. Whilst being of help in all uterine problems, it is specifically useful in delayed or absent menstruation. Where ovarian pain occurs, False Unicorn Root may be safely used. It is also indicated to prevent threatened miscarriage and ease vomiting associated with pregnancy. However, large doses will cause nausea and vomiting.

Dosage:
Decoction: Put 1-2 teaspoonfuls of the root in a cup of water, bring to boiling and simmer gently for 10-15 minutes. This should be drunk three times a day. For threatened miscarriage it may be drunk copiously.

Tincture: Take 2-4 ml of the tincture three times a day.

You may click to see :Improve Fertility Problems Naturally With Herbs :

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chamaelirium
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=CHLU&photoID=chlu_3v.jpg
http://www.holisticonline.com/herbal-med/_Herbs/h236.htm
http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/consumer/factsheets/wildflowers/chamaelirium_luteum.html
http://www.holisticonline.com/herbal-med/_Herbs/h236.htm
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Chamaelirium+luteum

Stemless Carline Thistle (Carlina acaulis)

Botanical Name :Carlina acaulis
Family : Compositae/Asteraceae
Genus : Carlina
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales
Tribe: Cynareae
Species: C. acaulis
Common Names :Stemless carline thistle, Dwarf carline thistle, or Silver thistle

Habitat: Native to alpine regions of central and southern Europe. Poor soils in dry sandy pastures and on rocky slopes, especially on limestone.Cultivated Beds;

Description:
It is  Biennial/Perennial  dicotyledonous flowering plant in the family Asteraceae,  The common names are descriptive of the manner that its flower head rests directly upon a basal leaf rosette.

CLICK TO SEE THE PICTURES.>……...(1)...(2).……..(3)..……(4).….
The spiny, pinnatilobate leaves grow in a basal rosette approximately 20 cm in diameter. The flowers are produced in a large (up to 10 cm) flowerhead of silvery-white ray florets around a central disc. The disc florets are tubular and yellow-brown in colour. To protect the pollen, the head closes in wet weather, a phenomenon folklore holds to presage forthcoming rain. The flowering time is between August and September.

It prefers chalky soils and dry pastures in environments from valleys up to an altitude of 2,800 m.

It is hardy to zone 4. It is in flower in June, and the seeds ripen from July to August. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, Lepidoptera (Moths & Butterflies). The plant is self-fertile.
The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils, requires well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very alkaline soil. It cannot grow in the shade. It requires dry or moist soi

Subspecies
There are two subspecies:

Carlina acaulis subsp. acaulis – inflorescences sessile
Carlina acaulis subsp. simplex – inflorescences with a short stem

Cultivation:
Succeeds in a sunny position in ordinary garden soil. Prefers a neutral to alkaline soil. Prefers a poor soil. Established plants are drought tolerant. Plants are hardy to about -20°c. The stemless carline thistle is a protected plant in the wild because of its rarity. This species resents root disturbance, it should be planted into its final position as soon as possible. Plants are usually short-lived or monocarpic. The plant is popular in dried flower arranging, the dried heads keeping their appearance indefinitely.

Propagation
Seed – surface sow in a cold frame in the spring. The seed usually germinates in 4 – 8 weeks at 15°c. As soon as they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out into their permanent positions in the summer.


Edible Uses

Edible Parts: Flowers; Root; Stem.

Flowering head – cooked. Used as a globe artichoke substitute, though they are considerably smaller and even more fiddly. The fleshy centre of the plant is edible. Does this refer to the peeled stem?. Root. No more details are given.


Medicinal Actions &  Uses

Carminative; Diaphoretic; Digestive; Diuretic; Emetic; Febrifuge; Purgative.

The rhizome contains a number of essential oils, in particular the antibacterial carlina oxide. The root was formerly employed in herbal medicine as a diuretic and cold remedy.

Stemless carline thistle is seldom used in modern herbalism. The plant was at one time in great demand as an aphrodisiac, it is occasionally used nowadays in the treatment of spasms of the digestive tract, gall bladder and liver disorders, dropsy, urine retention etc. The root has also been used in treating a range of skin complaints such as acne and eczema. A decoction of the root can be used externally to cleanse wounds or as an antiseptic gargle. Some caution should be employed since in large doses the root is purgative and emetic. The root is antibiotic, antispasmodic, carminative, diaphoretic, digestive, mildly diuretic, emetic in large doses, febrifuge and purgative in large doses. The root is harvested in the autumn and dried for later use.

Other Uses

Weather forecasting.

The dried flowers respond to the amount of humidity in the air and can be used as hygrometers. Flowers on the growing plant close at the approach of rain.

It is sometimes cultivated as a rockery plant, or dried and hung as a house decoration.

In Basque culture it was traditionally used as symbol of good fortune, fixed into the frontal door of the house.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Carlina+acaulis
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlina_acaulis
http://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Carlina_acaulis

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