Tag Archives: Mucolytic agent

Calamintha nepeta

Botanical Name : Calamintha nepeta
Family: Lamiaceae
Genus: Calamintha
Species: C. nepeta
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Lamiales

Synonyms : Satureia nepeta.

Common Name: Lesser Calamint,Nepitella

Habitat ; Grows in Europe, including Britain, south from France and S. Russia to N. Africa and to Iran in W. Asia.Dry banks, usually on calcareous soils

Description:
Lesser Calamint grows as a beautiful perennial shrub for the herbal border forming a compact mound of shiny, green oregano-like leaves which become covered with lavender pink flowers to a height of 18 inches. The Lesser Calamint plant smells like a cross between mint, and oregano, and can attract butterflies. Lesser Calamint usually grows in the Summer, and well into the Fall. This plant needs not to be replanted year after year, as it can become dormant in the winter months, then reblossom in the spring. Furthermore, in the Fall, the plant’s flowers, which contain seeds, fall to the ground, and will “plant themselves,” therefore making a new plant blossom in the Spring. These flowers will start to appear in late August. Lesser Calamint grows wildly, but can be planted in pots, for convenience. The life expectancy for an average Lesser Calamint plant is about 3–4 years. The only problem with this plant is that a powdery mildew might occur on the plant.

 

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Cultivation :
Prefers a well-drained dry to moist neutral to alkaline soil and a warm sunny position. Plants are hardy to about -15°c. This species is very closely related to C. sylvatica, and is considered to be no more than a sub-species by some botanists. A very good bee plant.

Propagation :
Seed – sow spring in a greenhouse and only just cover the seed. It usually germinates in 2 weeks at 21°c[138]. Prick out the seedlings when they are large enough to handle and, if they grow sufficiently, plant them out into their permanent positions in the summer otherwise wait until the following spring. Division in spring. Very easy, larger clumps can be planted direct into their permanent positions. It is best to pot up smaller clumps and grow them on in a cold frame until they are well rooted before planting them out in the summer. Basal cuttings in May or June. They should be rooted in a sandy compost[245]. Harvest the shoots when they are about 10 – 15cm long with plenty of underground stem. Pot them up into individual pots and keep them in light shade in a cold frame or greenhouse until they are rooting well. Plant them out in the summer.

Medicinal Uses:
Aromatic;  DiaphoreticExpectorantFebrifugeStomachic.

Lesser calamint was commonly used as a medicinal herb in medieval times, though is little used by modern herbalists. It is sometimes cultivated as a medicinal herb for household use. The whole plant is aromatic, diaphoretic, expectorant, febrifuge and stomachic. The leaves are harvested in July as the plant comes into flower and are dried for later use. An infusion is beneficial in cases of flatulent colic and weaknesses of the stomach, it is also used to treat depression, insomnia and painful menstruation[238]. It should not be prescribed for pregnant women since in excess it can cause a miscarriage.

Calamintha nepita breaks a fever by promoting sweating. It is also used as an expectorant and helps to cure jaundice. Effective when applied to snake bites and insect stings. In the Journal of Ethnopharmacology, a study reported in 1993 showed that Calamintha nepita when analyzed for its antimicrobial and fungicide activities it was found to have a biotoxic effect.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resours:
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_LMN.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calamintha_nepeta
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Calamintha+nepeta

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Aristolochia contorta

 

Botanical Name : Aristolochia contorta
Family: Aristolochiaceae
Subfamily: Aristolochioideae
Genus: Aristolochia
Species : Aristolochia contorta
Order: Piperales

Synonyms : A. nipponica.

Common Name: Ma Dou Ling

Habitat : E. Asia – China, Japan, Korea, Manchuria. .-Aug. Grows in edges of mountain woods.

Description:
Aristolochia contorta is a  perennial  herb, growing to 1.5 m (5ft). It is in flower from May to July, and the seeds ripen from Sep to October. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Flies.

…...CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

The shrub  has  stout elongated rhizomes. Stem slender, glabrous. Leaves alternate, cordate or broadly ovate-cordate, 4-10 cm long, 3.5-8 cm wide, acute or obtuse at tip, cordate at base, entire, petioles 1-7 cm long.(CLICK & SEE) Peduncles axillary, 1-4 cm long, with prominent bracts at base. Flowers few in axils, fascicled, the pedicels 1-4 cm long; the calyx tubular, inflated and globose at base, loosely pilose inside; the limb dilated, obliquely truncate, narrowly deltoid, long-acuminate to a filiform point; stamens 6, ovary inferior. Fruit a capsule,globose, 3 cm in diameter, 6 valved. Jul.-Aug……...CLICK & SEE

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires moist soil.

Cultivation:
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in many parts of this country. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Prefers a well-drained loamy soil, rich in organic matter, in sun or semi-shade. Succeeds in ordinary garden soil. Most species in this genus have malodorous flowers that are pollinated by flies.

Propagation
Seed – best sown in a greenhouse as soon as it is ripe in the autumn. Pre-soak stored seed for 48 hours in hand-hot water and surface sow in a greenhouse. Germination usually takes place within 1 – 3 months at 20°c. Stored seed germinates better if it is given 3 months cold stratification at 5°c. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer after the last expected frosts. Division in autumn. Root cuttings in winter.

Edible Uses :
Edible Parts: Leaves.

Medicinal Uses;
Antiasthmatic;  Antiseptic;  Antitussive;  Cancer;  Expectorant;  Sedative.

The fruit and its capsule are antiasthmatic, antiseptic, antitussive and expectorant. A decoction of the fruit is used in the treatment of cancer, coughs, inflammation of the respiratory organs, haemorrhoids and hypertension. It is also used to resolve phlegm and lower blood pressure. It has an antibacterial action, effective against Staphylococcus aureus, Pneumococci, bacillus dysentericae etc. The root contains aristolochic acid. This has anti-cancer properties and can be used in conjunction with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Aristolochic acid can also be used in the treatment of acute and serious infections such as TB, hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and infantile pneumonia. It also increases the cellular immunity and phagocytosis function of the phagocytic cells. Aristolochic acid is said to be too toxic for clinical use. The root is used as a purgative in the treatment of rabies and also has sedative properties.

A decoction of the fruit is used in the treatment of cancer, coughs, inflammation of the respiratory organs, hemorrhoids and hypertension. It is also used to resolve phlegm and lower blood pressure. It has an antibacterial action, effective against Staphylococcus aureus, Pneumococci, bacillus dysentericae etc. The root contains aristolochic acid. This has anti-cancer properties and can be used in conjunction with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Aristolochic acid can also be used in the treatment of acute and serious infections such as TB, hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and infantile pneumonia. It also increases the cellular immunity and phagocytosis function of the phagocytic cells. Aristolochic acid is said to be too toxic for clinical use. The root is used as a purgative in the treatment of rabies and also has sedative properties.

Known Hazards:  No specific details for this species is found but most members of this genus have poisonous roots and stems. The plant contains aristolochic acid, this has received rather mixed reports on its toxicity. According to one report aristolochic acid stimulates white blood cell activity and speeds the healing of wounds, but is also carcinogenic and damaging to the kidneys. Another report says that it is an active antitumour agent but is too toxic for clinical use. Another report says that aristolochic acid has anti-cancer properties and can be used in conjunction with chemotherapy and radiotherapy and that it also increases the cellular immunity and phagocytosis function of the phagocytic cells.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Aristolochia+contorta
http://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Aristolochia_contorta
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_LMN.htm

http://www.wpro.who.int/internet/files/pub/97/33.pdf

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Helichrysum stoechas

Botanical Name : Helichrysum stoechas
Family: Asteraceae
Subfamily: Asteroideae
Tribes: Gnaphalieae
Genus: Helichrysum
Species: Helichrysum stoechas
Regnum: Plantae
Order: Asterales

Common Name :Eternal Flower

Habitat :Helichrysum stoechas grows in south and west Europe on dry banks, rocks and sands. Helichrysum stoechas also grows in northwest Africa and eastwards as far as Turkey.

Description:
Helichrysum stoechas is a perennial herb,  growing to 0.5 m (1ft 8in) by 1 m (3ft 3in).
It is hardy to zone 8. It is in leaf 12-Jan It is in flower from Jul to August. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.This plant can be identified by a strong smell of curry when the leaves or stems are crushed.


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The plant prefers light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils, requires well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It cannot grow in the shade.It requires dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought.The plant can tolerates strong winds but not maritime exposure.

Cultivation:
Requires a light well-drained soil in a sunny sheltered position. Intolerant of excessive moisture. Established plants are drought resistant. This species is not hardy in the colder areas of the country, it tolerates temperatures down to about -10°c. An aromatic plant with beautiful foliage, there are several named varieties, selected for their ornamental value. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.

Propagation:
Seed – sow February/March in a greenhouse. The seed usually germinates in 2 – 3 weeks at 20°c. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 5cm with a heel, June/July in a frame. Roots in 4 weeks. Good percentage[

Medicinal Uses:
Deobstruent;  DiaphoreticEmollientExpectorant.

Formerly used as an expectorant.  The ointment it seems to have beneficial effects on skin diseases, while reduced in aerosol it is a good remedy against bronchitis and asthma.

The stem tops and the flowers are deobstruent and expectorant. They have been used in the treatment of colds but their use is now considered to be obsolete. The flowers have been used as diaphoretics and discutients.

The aroma is very supportive and comforting, warm, honey like, rich and buttery, with undertones of wood, spices, herb. It is believed by some to open the right side of the brain and improve creativity as well as increase dream activity. It is used in meditation blends to encourage spirituality and personal growth. It is considered by some to be one of the ‘sacred’ oils.

Helichrysum has been studied in Europe as a nerve tonic, tissue repair, reducing inflammation, and speeding the healing of bruises.

Helichrysum blends well with Atlas Cedarwood Atlas, Blue Chamomile, Cypress, Geranium, Lavender, Neroli, Patchouli, Rose, and Vetiver.

Essential oils are extremely concentrated and potent. Most essential oils should be diluted before use, and most are not intended for internal use. For more information, consult an aromatherapy practitioner.

This product is not intended to diagnose or cure any disease. If you are sick or believe you might be sick, consult your doctor.

FDA regulations don’t allow for any claims to made for herbs and we are not allowed to make specific claims about how herbs my help you heal. Please go to the library or search the web for more specific uses of Essential Oils

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_DE.htm
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Helichrysum+stoechas
http://www.first-nature.com/flowers/helichrysum_stoechas.php
http://www.sharnoffphotos.com/nature/flowers_provence/helichrysum%202.html
http://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Helichrysum_stoechas

http://www.taosherb.com/store/helichrysum_stoechas_pure_essential_oil.html

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Emilia sonchifolia

Botanical Name : Emilia sonchifolia
Family: Asteraceae
Genus: Emilia
Species: E. sonchifolia
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales

Synonyms: Cacalia sonchifolia.
Sanskrit Synonyms: Sasasruti, Akhukarni, Dravanti, Sambari

Common Names: lilac tasselflower,Cupid’s Shaving Brush
Hindi; Kirankari, Hirankhuri
Malayalam; mMuyalchevi

Habitats: Native to Tropical Asia.   Waste ground in C. and S. Japan. Moist areas and uncultivated ground at elevations up to 1700 metres in Nepal.

Description:
Emilia sonchifolia is a soft  annual  growing to 0.6 m (2ft).  Leaves simple, lyrate –pinnate with large terminal lobe; flowers purplish in corymbose heads, fruits oblong containing many seeds; seeds long, compressed, having terminal tuft of soft hairs for wind dispersal.

YOU MAY CLICK TO SEE THE PICTURES OF  EMILIA SONCHIFOLIA
It is hardy to zone 9 and is frost tender. It is in flower from Jul to October, and the seeds ripen from Aug to October. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.The plant is self-fertile.

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It cannot grow in the shade.It requires moist soil.

Cultivation :
An easily grown plant, succeeding in most well-drained soils in a sunny position. Plants flower better when growing on nutritionally poor soils, producing much lusher growth on rich soils. Plants are drought tolerant once established. Plants are not frost hardy, but they succeed outdoors in Britain as a spring-sown annual. Slugs can be a problem with this plant in a wet spring. The leaves are frequently sold in local markets in Java.

Propagation :
Seed – sow early spring in a greenhouse and only just cover the seed. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out after the last expected frosts. The seed can also be sown outdoors in situ in the middle of spring

Edible Uses
Edible Parts: Leaves.

Leaves and young shoots – raw or cooked. Used as a vegetable. The whole plant, including the flowers, can be eaten raw or cooked. The leaves are usually harvested and used before the plant flowers. A nutritional analysis of the leaves is available. The powdered plant is used to prepare a cake fermented with yeast (called marcha in Nepal) from which liquor is distilled.

Constituents :
Figures in grams (g) or miligrams (mg) per 100g of food.
Leaves (Dry weight)
•308 Calories per 100g
•Water : 0%
•Protein: 22g; Fat: 3.3g; Carbohydrate: 64.3g; Fibre: 11g; Ash: 10.4g;
•Minerals – Calcium: 2187mg; Phosphorus: 648mg; Iron: 0mg; Magnesium: 0mg; Sodium: 0mg; Potassium: 0mg; Zinc: 0mg;
•Vitamins – A: 0mg; Thiamine (B1): 0mg; Riboflavin (B2): 0mg; Niacin: 0mg; B6: 0mg; C: 0mg;

Medicinal Uses :
Astringent;  Depurative;  Diaphoretic;  Diuretic;  ExpectorantFebrifuge;  Odontalgic;  Ophthalmic.

A tea made from the leaves is used in the treatment of dysentery. The juice of the leaves is used in treating eye inflammations, night blindness, cuts and wounds and sore ears. The plant is astringent, depurative, diuretic, expectorant, febrifuge and sudorific. It is used in the treatment of infantile tympanites and bowel complaints. The juice of the root is used in the treatment of diarrhoea. The flower heads are chewed and kept in the mouth for about 10 minutes to protect teeth from decay.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Emilia+sonchifolia
http://enchantingkerala.org/ayurveda/ayurvedic-medicinal-plants/muyalchevi.php
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emilia_sonchifolia

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