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Ailmemts & Remedies

Managing Symptoms of Menopause

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The following tips may be beneficial for these common symptoms of menopause:

Hot Flashes:
1.Wear fabrics that breathe, such as cotton. Do not wear silk, polyester and other synthetics that tend to trap body heat.

2.If you feel a hot flash coming on, drink a glass of cold water.

3.If troubled by night sweats, keep a cold facecloth or ice pack by your bed.

4.Instead of pantyhose, wear cotton pants or thigh high stockings.

5.Decrease your intake of caffeine and alcohol.

6.Avoid spicy foods and hot drinks.

7.Avoid tobacco.

8.Try eating and drinking more soy products.

9.Some women claim that taking vitamin E daily helps.
Vaginal Dryness/Urinary Problems
(urinary tract infections, incontinence)

10. Use a vaginal cream or lubricant (avoid petroleum jelly) to help reduce pain from dryness during sexual intercourse.

11.Urinate before and after sexual intercourse to help prevent bladder infections.

12.Drink plenty of fluids and empty your bladder frequently.

13. Try Kegel exercises (tighten and relax the muscles you use to stop urination) daily. They strengthen the vaginal muscles, enhance orgasm, and help prevent incontinence.

Psychological Problems
(anxiety, irritability, depression)

1.Communicate openly with your partner about your symptoms and ask for support.

2.Join or even start a support group specific to menopause or other life changes you are experiencing.

3.Find and share support with colleagues at work who are going through the same thing.
Seek counseling.

4.Medication such as tranquilizers and antidepressants may help.

5.Identify which sources of stress you can eliminate from your life.

Forgetfulness
1.Write things down.

2.Use appointment books, calendars, post-it notes, alarm clocks and timers.

3.Ask other people for reminders.

Weight Gain:
1.Engage in an aerobic or Yoga exercise at least three times per week for at least 30 minutes per session.

2.Find ways to incorporate more exercise into your daily routine, such as taking the stairs instead of the elevator.

3.Decrease your intake of fat and calories.

Native Remedies has put together a trio of effective, natural remedies proven Menopause and PMS. Each, on its own, has been shown to be highly effective.

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Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.

 

Source:www.beliefnet.com

Categories
Ailmemts & Remedies

Bedwetting

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Why does some chieldren wet the bed?
Many children wet the bed until they are 5 years old, or even older. In most cases, the cause is physical and not the child’s fault. The child’s bladder might be too small. Or the amount of urine produced overnight is too much for the bladder to hold. As a result, the bladder fills up before the night is over. Some children sleep too deeply or take longer to learn bladder control. Children don’t wet the bed on purpose. Bedwetting is a medical problem, not a behavior problem. Scolding and punishment will not help a child stay dry.
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Bedwetting may run in the family. If both parents wet the bed as children, their child is likely to have the same problem. If only one parent has a history of bedwetting, the child has about a fifty-fifty chance of having the problem. Some children wet the bed even if neither parent ever did.

Bedwetting may be caused by an infection or a nerve disease. Children with nerve disease often also have daytime wetting.

 

How can you help your child stay dry?

A child who has been dry for several months or even years may return to wetting the bed. The cause might be emotional stress, such as loss of a loved one, problems at school, a new sibling, or even training too early.
The answer is rarely easy. Try skipping drinks before bedtime. Avoid drinks with caffeine, like colas or tea. These drinks speed up urine production. Give your child one drink with dinner. Explain that it will be the last drink before going to bed. Make sure your child uses the bathroom just before bed. Many children will still wet the bed, but these steps are a place to start.

 

Your child may feel bad about wetting the bed. Let your child know he isn’t to blame. Let her help take off the wet sheets and put them in the washer, but don’t make this a punishment. Be supportive. Praise your child for dry nights.

Be patient. Most children grow out of bedwetting. Some children just take more time than others.

 

Should you take your child to the doctor?
If your child is younger than 5, don’t worry about bedwetting. Many children do not stay dry at night until age 7. Most children outgrow wetting the bed. A single episode of bedwetting should not cause alarm, even in an older child.

If your child is 7 years old or older and wets the bed more than two or three times in a week, a doctor may be able to help. If both day and night wetting occur after age 5, your child should see a doctor before age 7.

 

The doctor will ask questions about your child’s health and the wetting problem. Your child will likely be asked for a urine sample. The doctor uses the sample to look for signs of infection. By testing the reflexes in the child’s legs and feet, the doctor can check for nerve damage. Sometimes bedwetting is a sign of diabetes, a condition that can cause frequent urination.

 

If your child has an infection, the doctor can prescribe medicine. In most cases, the doctor finds that the child is normal and healthy. If your child is basically healthy, a variety of ways are available to help your child stop wetting the bed.

What treatments can help your child stay dry?
Talk with your doctor about ways to help your child. Many choices exist. Let your child help decide which ones to try.

Bladder Training
Bladder training can help your child hold urine longer. Write down what times your child urinates during the day. Then figure out the times between trips to the bathroom. After a day or two, have your child try to wait an extra 15 minutes before using the bathroom. If the child usually goes to the bathroom at 3:30 p.m., have him wait until 3:45. Slowly make the times longer and longer. This method is designed for children with small bladders. It helps stretch the bladder to hold more urine. Be patient. Bladder training can take several weeks, or even months.

Moisture Alarm
A small moisture alarm can be put in the child’s bed or underwear. The alarm triggers a bell or buzzer with the first drops of urine. The sound wakes the child. Your child can then stop the flow of urine, get up, and use the bathroom. Waking also teaches the child how a full bladder feels.

Medicine
Two kinds of medicine are available for treating bedwetting. One medicine slows down how fast your body makes urine. The other medicine helps the bladder relax so it can hold more urine. These medicines often work well. Remember wetting may return when the child stops taking the medicine. If this occurs, keeping the child on medicine for a longer time helps.

1.Ayurvedic Treatment 2. Homeopathic Treatment

3.Natural remedy 4.Home Remedies for Bedwetting

Points to Remember
1.Normal, healthy children may wet the bed.

2.Bedwetting may be a sign of infection or other problems.

3.Many children are dry at night by the time they are 5 years old. Others take longer to stay dry.

4.Scolding and punishment do not help a child stop bedwetting.

5.If your child is 7 or older and wets the bed more than two or three times a week, a doctor may be able to help.

6.Treatments include bladder training, alarms, and medicines.

7.Most children grow out of bedwetting naturally.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.

Source:kidney.niddk.nih.gov/

Categories
Ailmemts & Remedies

Cystitis (Inflammation of the urinary Bladder)

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The term  CYSTITIS  refers to inflammation of the urinary bladder. The recurrence of cystitis may in some cases, be associated with kidney trouble.

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Symptoms:
The patient complains of an almost continual urge to void and a burning sensation on passing urine. There may be feeling of pain in the pelvis and lower abdomen. The urine may become thick, dark and stringy. It may have an unpleasant smell and may contain blood or pus. Some pain in the lower back may also be felt in certain cases. In an acute stage, there may be rise in body temperature. In the chronic form of cystitis the symptoms are similar but generally less severe and longer lasting, and without a fever.

Root causes:
Cystitis may result from infection in other parts connected with or adjacent to the bladder such as the kidneys, the urethra the vagina, or the prostate gland. There may be local irritation and inflammation in the bladder if urine is retained there for an unduly long time. Cystitis may also results from acute constipation. Other conditions like an infected kidney, stones in the kidneys or bladder, or an enlarged prostate may also lead to this disorder.

Diagnosis
When cystitis is suspected, the doctor first examines a person’s abdomen and lower back, to evaluate unusual enlargements of the kidneys or swelling of the bladder. In small children, the doctor checks for fever, abdominal masses, and a swollen bladder.

The next step in diagnosis is collection of a urine sample. The procedure involves voiding into a cup, so small children may be catheterized to collect a sample. Laboratory testing of urine samples as of the early 2000s can be performed with dipsticks that indicate immune system responses to infection, as well as with microscopic analysis of samples. Normal human urine is sterile. The presence of bacteria or pus in the urine usually indicates infection. The presence of hematuria (blood in the urine) may indicate acute UTIs, kidney disease, kidney stones, inflammation of the prostate (in men), endometriosis (in women), or cancer of the urinary tract. In some cases, blood in the urine results from athletic training, particularly in runners.

Other tests
Women and children with recurrent UTIs can be given ultrasound exams of the kidneys and bladder together with a voiding cystourethrogram to test for structural abnormalities. (A cystourethrogram is an x-ray test in which an iodine dye is used to better view the urinary bladder and urethra.) In some cases, computed tomography scans (CT scans) can be used to evaluate people for possible cancers in the urinary tract.

Medications
Uncomplicated cystitis is treated with antibiotics. These include penicillin, ampicillin, and amoxicillin; sulfisoxazole or sulfamethoxazole; trimethoprim; nitrofurantoin; cephalosporins; or fluoroquinolones. (Fluoroquinolones generally are not used in children under 18 years of age.) A 2003 study showed that fluoroquinolone was preferred over amoxicillin, however, for uncomplicated cystitis in young women. Treatment for women is short-term; most women respond within three days. Men and children do not respond as well to short-term treatment and require seven to 10 days of oral antibiotics for uncomplicated UTIs.

Persons of either gender may be given phenazopyridine or flavoxate to relieve painful urination.

Trimethoprim and nitrofurantoin are preferred for treating recurrent UTIs in women.

Individuals with pyelonephritis can be treated with oral antibiotics or intramuscular doses of cephalosporins. Medications are given for ten to 14 days and sometimes longer. If the person requires hospitalization because of high fever and dehydration caused by vomiting, antibiotics can be given intravenously.

Surgery
A minority of women with complicated UTIs may require surgical treatment to prevent recurrent infections. Surgery also is used to treat reflux problems (movement of the urine backward) or other structural abnormalities in children and anatomical abnormalities in adult males.

Alternative treatment
Alternative treatment for cystitis may emphasize eliminating all sugar from the diet and drinking lots of water. Drinking unsweetened cranberry juice not only adds fluid but also is thought to help prevent cystitis by making it more difficult for bacteria to cling to the bladder wall. A variety of herbal therapies also are recommended. Generally, the recommended herbs are antimicrobials, such as garlic (Allium sativum), goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis), and bearberry (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi); and/or demulcents that soothe and coat the urinary tract, including corn silk and marsh mallow (Althaea officinalis).Cucumber juice ,Radish Leaves ,Spinach ,Sandalwood Oil.

Diet: At the onset of acute Cystitis, it is essential to withhold all solid foods immediately. If there is fever, the patient should take only liquid food like fruit juices, soups, barley water, boiled vegetables etc. After the fever is over then patient should take non-spicy food for few days. Then gradually embark upon the all types of food.

Lifestyle : During the first three or four days of acute cystitis, when the patient is on a liquid diet, it is advisable to rest and keep warm. Pain can be relieved by immersing the pelvis in hot water. Alternatively, heat can applied to the abdomen, by using a towel wrung out in hot water and covering it with a dry towel to retain warmth. The treatment may be continued for three or four days by which time the inflammation should have subsided and the temperature returned to normal.

Regular pratice of  Yoga ,  particularly   Pranayama and Padma Asana will  give a very good result.

Homeopathic medicine also can be effective in treating cystitis. Choosing the correct remedy based on the individual’s symptoms is always key to the success of this type of treatment. Acupuncture and Chinese traditional herbal medicine can also be helpful in treating acute and chronic cases of cystitis.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.

Source:www.healthline.com and www.allayurveda.com

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