Tag Archives: Achillea

Agrimonia pilosa

Botanical Name : Agrimonia pilosa
Family: Rosaceae
Genus: Agrimonia
Species:A. pilosa
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Rosales

Common Name : Hairy Agrimony

Habitat:Agrimonia pilosa is native to E. Europe to E. Asia – China, Japan. It grows on the meadows and roadsides in lowland and mountains all over Japan. Forest undergrowth and shady places by the sides of roads at elevations of 1000 – 3000 metres in Nepal.
Description:
Agrimonia pilosa is a perennial herb with erect stem growing 30 centimetres (12 in) – 120 centimetres (47 in) height. It grows along roadsides or in grassy areas at divers altitudes. It can grow in light sandy, loamy or heavy soils. Its suitable pH for growing properly is acid or basic alkaline soils. It has many lateral roots and its rhizome is short and usually tuberous. Its stems are colored yellowish green or green and its upper part is sparsely pubescent and pilose, but the lower part had dense hairs. Its leaves are green, alternate and odd-pinnate with 2-4 pairs of leaflets. The number of leaflets reduces to 3 on upper leaves. The leaves are oval and edged with pointy teeth of similar size. The leaves are 3 centimetres (1.2 in) – 6 centimetres (2.4 in) long and 1.5 centimetres (0.59 in) – 3.5 centimetres (1.4 in) wide. And it is hairy on both sides…CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES
Cultivation:
Succeeds in most soils, preferring a calcareous soil. Prefers a sunny position. The ssp. A. pilosa japonica. (Miq.)Nakai. is used medicinally in China.

Propagation:
Seed – can be sown in spring or autumn, either in pots in a cold frame or in situ. It usually germinates in 2 – 6 weeks at 13°c, though germination rates can be low, especially if the seed has been stored. A period of cold stratification helps but is not essential. When grown in pots, prick out the seedlings when they are large enough to handle and plant them out in late spring or early summer. Division in autumn. Very easy, the divisions can be planted straight out into their permanent positions.

Edible Uses: …Young leaves – cooked. Seed – dried and ground into a meal. Mixed with noodles.

Medicinal Uses:
Agrimonia pilosa contains certain chemical components such as agrimonolide, coumarin, tannin, as well as flavonoids, phenylpropanoids, and triterpenes. Some components are bioactive against dysentery, tumours, and yeast infections; and helpful in maintaining bacteriostasis and stimulating the immune system.

Agrimonia pilosa is traditionally used in Korea to treat boils, eczema, and taeniasis (a tape worm condition). In Nepal and China, A. pilosa is used to treat abdominal pain, sore throat, headaches, and heat stroke.

The stems and the leaves are analgesic, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, astringent, cardiotonic, haemostatic, hypoglycaemic, taenicide and vasoconstrictor. The plant is used in the treatment of abdominal pain, sore throat, headaches, bloody and mucoid dysentery, bloody and white discharge and heat-stroke. It is used in Korea to treat parasitic worms, bois and ezema. The leaves are rich in vitamin K and are used to promote blood clotting and control bleeding. The plant contains agrimonin, this is haemostatic, cardiotonic and lowers blood sugar, though it can also produce palpitations and congestion of the blood in the face. The root ia astringent, diuretic and tonic. It is used in the treatment of coughs, colds, tuberculosis and diarrhoea. The root juice is used in the treatment of peptic ulcer. A paste of the root is used to treat stomach ache. Plants are harvested as they come into flower and can be dried for later use.
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Agrimonia+pilosa
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agrimonia_pilosa

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Allium bisceptrum

Botanical Name : Allium bisceptrum
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Subfamily:Allioideae
Genus: Allium
Species:A. bisceptrum
Kingdom: Plantae

Synonyms:
*Allium bisceptrum var. palmeri (S. Watson) Cronquist
*Allium bisceptrum var. utahense M.E. Jones
*Allium palmeri S. Watson

Common Names: Twincrest onion,Aspen Onion

Habitat:Allium bisceptrum is native to Western N. America – Oregon to California (California, Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Utah. ) It grows on the meadows and aspen groves, occasionally on open slopes.
Description:
Allium bisceptrum is twincrest onion which is a perennial herb at altitudes ranging from 2000 to 2900 meters.It is a is a bulb growing to 0.3 m (1ft). They grow up to anywhere between ten to forty cm high. The onion bulbs are round and egg-shaped. The bulbs have a light tint and when cut, has a powerful odor. Their flower heads are about 10–15 mm in length. The flowers are a lightly tinted purple. Each flower head contains usually six petals with pointed tips. Their flat leaves usually come in pairs of two or three and give off an odor when scratched.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

It is in flower from Jul to August. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, insects.

Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Flowers; Leaves; Root; Seed.
Bulb – raw or cooked. They were usually harvested in spring or early summer. The bulbs are 10 – 15mm wide. Leaves – raw or cooked. Used as a relish. Flowers – raw. Used as a garnish on salads. The seed heads can be placed in hot ashes for a few minutes, then the seeds extracted and eaten.
Medicinal Uses:
The plant juice has been used as an appetite restorer. Although no other specific mention of medicinal uses has been seen for this species, members of this genus are in general very healthy additions to the diet. They contain sulphur compounds (which give them their onion flavour) and when added to the diet on a regular basis they help reduce blood cholesterol levels, act as a tonic to the digestive system and also tonify the circulatory system.

Other Uses: The juice of the plant is used as a moth repellent. The whole plant is said to repel insects and moles. Wild animals in the area such as elk, black bears, white-tailed prairie dogs, and mantled ground squirrels eat the bulbs of the wild onions. Some cattle and sheep also graze these plants.

Known Hazards : Although no individual reports regarding this species have been seen, there have been cases of poisoning caused by the consumption, in large quantities and by some mammals, of certain members of this genus. Dogs seem to be particularly susceptible.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allium_bisceptrum
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Allium+bisceptrum

Allium angulare

Botanical Name: Allium angulare
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Subfamily: Allioideae
Genus: Allium
Species: A. angulosum
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asparagales

Synonyms: Allium angulosum, Allium angulatum Pall

Common Names: Mouse garlic

Habitat : Allium angulare is a species of garlic native to a wide region of central Europe and northern Asia, from France and Italy to Siberia and Kazakhstan.

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Description:
Allium angulosum is a perennial herb up to 50 cm tall. It is a is a bulb which is narrow and elongated, about 5 mm in diameter. The plant produces a hemispherical umbel of small pink flowers on long pedicels. It is not frost tender. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, insects…...CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES
Cultivation:
The plant prefers a sunny position in a light well-drained soil. The bulbs should be planted fairly deeply. Most members of this genus are intolerant of competition from other growing plants. Grows well with most plants, especially roses, carrots, beet and chamomile, but it inhibits the growth of legumes. This plant is a bad companion for alfalfa, each species negatively affecting the other. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.

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Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle – if you want to produce clumps more quickly then put three plants in each pot. Grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter and plant them out into their permanent positions in spring once they are growing vigorously and are large enough. Division in spring. Very easy, the plants divide successfully at any time in the growing season and the divisions can be planted straight out into their permanent positions if required.

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Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Flowers; Leaves; Root.
Bulb – raw or cooked. A winter food. Leaves – raw or cooked. Flowers – raw. Used as a garnish on salads.

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Medicinal Uses:
Although no specific mention of medicinal uses has been seen for this species, members of this genus are in general very healthy additions to the diet. They contain sulphur compounds (which give them their onion flavour) and when added to the diet on a regular basis they help reduce blood cholesterol levels, act as a tonic to the digestive system and also tonify the circulatory system.

Other Uses :
Allium angulosum is cultivated as an ornamental and also as an herb for kitchen gardens.The juice of the plant is used as a moth repellent. The whole plant is said to repel insects and moles.

Known Hazards: Although no individual reports regarding this species have been seen, there have been cases of poisoning caused by the consumption, in large quantities and by some mammals, of certain members of this genus. Dogs seem to be particularly susceptible.

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Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

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Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allium_angulosum
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Allium+angulare

Allium altaicum

Botanical Name : Allium altaicum
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Subfamily: Allioideae
Genus: Allium
Species:A. altaicum
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asparagales

Common Names: Altai onion

Habitat :Allium altaicum is native to Asiatic Russia (Altay, Buryatiya, Zabaykalsky Krai, Irkutsk, Tuva, Amur Oblast), Mongolia, Kazakhstan and northern China (Inner Mongolia, Heilongjiang and Xinjiang). It grows on the rocky areas. Slopes and plains in N. China.

Description:
Allium altaicum is a perennial grass like plant of the onion family. It typically forms a basal clump to 12-15” tall of narrow, glaucous, grass-like, linear leaves with entire margins and parallel venation. Bell-shaped, yellowish-white flowers in spherical umbels bloom in mid to late summer atop naked rounded hollow scapes rising above the foliage to 24-28” tall. Edible parts of this allium are the onion-flavored young spring leaves, summer flowers and underground bulbs.

CLICK & SEE  THE PICTURES

It produces narrowly egg-shaped bulbs up to 4 cm in diameter. Scape is round in cross-section, up to 100 cm tall. Leaves are round, up to 50 cm long. Flowers are pale yellow, up to 20 mm across. Ovary is egg-shaped; stamens longer than the tepals.

It is in flower from Jul to August. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, insects.It is noted for attracting wildlife.
Cultivation:
An easily grown plant, it prefers a sunny position in a light well-drained soil. Succeeds in moist and acid soils. This species is probably an ancestor of the Welsh onion, A. fistulosum and as such is a potential genetic resource. Bees are very fond of the flowers of this plant. The bulbs should be planted fairly deeply. Most members of this genus are intolerant of competition from other growing plants. Grows well with most plants, especially roses, carrots, beet and chamomile, but it inhibits the growth of legumes. This plant is a bad companion for alfalfa, each species negatively affecting the other. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.
Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle – if you want to produce clumps more quickly then put three plants in each pot. Grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter and plant them out into their permanent positions in spring once they are growing vigorously and are large enough. Division in spring. The plants divide successfully at any time in the growing season, pot up the divisions in a cold frame or greenhouse until they are growing well and then plant them out into their permanent positions

Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Flowers; Leaves; Root.

Bulb – raw or cooked. The bulbs are formed in clusters on a rhizome and are up to 4cm wide. Leaves – raw or cooked. Flowers – raw. Used as a garnish on salads.

Medicinal Uses:
Although no specific mention of medicinal uses has been seen for this species, members of this genus are in general very healthy additions to the diet. They contain sulphur compounds (which give them their onion flavour) and when added to the diet on a regular basis they help reduce blood cholesterol levels, act as a tonic to the digestive system and also tonify the circulatory system.

Other Uses: ….Repellent….The growing plant is said to repel insects and moles

Edible Uses :
Edible Parts: Flowers; Leaves; Root.

Bulb – raw or cooked. The bulbs are formed in clusters on a rhizome and are up to 4cm wide.  Leaves – raw or cooked. Flowers – raw. Used as a garnish on salads.
Medicinal Uses:
Although no specific mention of medicinal uses has been seen for this species, members of this genus are in general very healthy additions to the diet. They contain sulphur compounds (which give them their onion flavour) and when added to the diet on a regular basis they help reduce blood cholesterol levels, act as a tonic to the digestive system and also tonify the circulatory system.

Other Uses: Repellent…The growing plant is said to repel insects and moles

Known Hazards: Although no individual reports regarding this species have been seen, there have been cases of poisoning caused by the consumption, in large quantities and by some mammals, of certain members of this genus. Dogs seem to be particularly susceptible.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?taxonid=281841&ispro
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allium_altaicum
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Allium+altaicum

Epimedium sagittatum

Botanical Name : Epimedium sagittatum
Family: Berberidaceae
Genus: Epimediu
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Ranunculales
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Ranunculales

Synonyms : Epimedium sinense.

Common Names: Yin Yang Huo (Epimedium is a genus of plants commonly called horny goat weed because of their claimed aphrodisiac effects.)

Habitat : Epimedium sagittatum is native to E. Asia – China. It grows on the hillsides in damp shady bamboo groves or in cliff crevices. Moist woodlands.

Description:
Epimedium sagittatum is a perennial plant, growing to 0.5 m (1ft 8in) by 0.4 m (1ft 4in). It is not frost tender. It is in flower from May to June. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees.The plant is not self-fertile…...CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES
Cultivation:
Succeeds in any fertile humus-rich soil, preferring a moist but well-drained peaty loam. Grows best in the light dappled shade of a woodland. Plants can succeed in the dry shade of trees. A shallow-rooting plant, the rhizomes creeping just below the soil and the finer roots occupying the top 30cm of the soil. Although the plants are hardy to at least -15°c, the young growth in spring can be killed by frosts. Grows well in the rock garden or wild garden. Plants are self-sterile and so more than one clone is required for cross-fertilization in order for seed to be produced. Plants will often hybridise with other species growing nearby[280]. Cultivated as a medicinal plant in Japan. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer or rabbits.
Propagation:
Seed – best sown in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe in late summer. Sow stored seed as early as possible in the year in a cold frame. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow them on in light shade in the cold frame or greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out in mid to late summer. Division in July/August according to one report, in late spring according to another[200]. Larger clumps can be replanted direct into their permanent positions, though it is best to pot up smaller clumps and grow them on in a cold frame until they are rooting well. Plant them out in the spring. Cuttings in late summer.

Edible Uses: …Young plant and young leaves – cooked. Soaked and then boiled. (This suggests that the leaves are bitter and need to be soaked in order to remove the bitterness.)

Medicinal Uses:
The whole plant is antirheumatic, aphrodisiac, carminative, expectorant, ophthalmic and vasodilator. Used as a kidney tonic, it also treats sterility and barrenness. It is taken internally in the treatment of asthma, bronchitis, cold or numb extremities, arthritis, lumbago, impotence, involuntary and premature ejaculation, high blood pressure and absentmindedness. It should be used with some caution since in excess it can cause vomiting, dizziness, thirst and nosebleeds. The plant is harvested in the growing season and dried for later use.

Epimedium sagittatum is one particular species of this genus. Along with its purported ability to enhance the libido, it has other traditional uses and a role in Chinese medicine, according to the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Consult with a qualified health care provider before beginning any herbal therapy.

People have used epimedium traditionally to treat symptoms of a variety of health conditions, including arthritis, nerve pain, and kidney and liver disorders. It is included in herbal treatment for cancer in Asia, as noted by the MSKCC. In the United States, people mainly take epimedium for its aphrodisiac effects and to relieve fatigue.

Other Uses : A good ground cover plant.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Epimedium+sagittatum
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epimedium
http://www.livestrong.com/article/203630-what-is-epimedium-sagittatum/