Tag Archives: Bone

Stretch Away Stress at Your Desk

Here’s a great way to reduce tension in the upper back, neck and shoulders. Practice this stretch at your desk after long hours of sitting in front of the computer or talking on the telephone.
CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES
Sit upright toward the front edge of a sturdy chair. Place your feet below your knees, hip-width apart. Hook your left elbow over your right elbow and wrap your forearms, pressing the palms of your hands together as much as you can. Inhale and raise your arms as you arch your upper back. Pause for a few breaths.

On an exhale, bring your chin in toward your throat, press your navel to your spine and move your elbows down toward your waist. Pause with your back in this C-curve position. Feel a deep stretch in your entire back and across the back of your shoulders. Inhale, raise your arms to repeat the arch and exhale again to repeat the C-curve. Return to center, then switch your arms and repeat.


Source :
The Losangles Times

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Drinking Beer May Strenthen Bones

Beer could stop bones from going brittle, research has shown.
A study found that the bones of women who drink beer regularly are stronger, meaning they are less likely to suffer from osteoporosis. But wine does little to protect against the disease, the journal Nutrition reports.
It is thought that the high level of silicon in beer slows down the thinning that leads to fractures and boosts the formation of new bone.
Beer is also rich in phytoestrogens, plant versions of oestrogen, which keep bones healthy.
Bones are made up of a mesh of fibres, minerals, blood vessels and marrow, and healthy ones are denser with smaller spaces between the different parts.
The researchers asked almost 1,700 healthy women with an average age of 48 about their drinking habits.
They then underwent ultrasound scans, which showed the bones in the hands of beer drinkers to be denser.
The women’s hands were chosen because the bones in the fingers are among the first to show signs of osteoporosis.
Those classed as light beer drinkers – having less than a pint a day – fared just as well as those in the moderate bracket, suggesting that even small amounts can boost bone health.
The Spanish researchers said: ‘Silicon plays a major role in bone formation. Beer has been claimed to be one of the most important sources of silicon in the Western diet.’
Three million Britons are affected by osteoporosis.

Source:Mail Online.15th. Aug.2009

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Bone Fracture

DEFINITION:-
If more pressure is put on a bone than it can stand, it will split or break. A break of any size is called a fracture. If the broken bone punctures the skin, it is called an open fracture (compound fracture)….>…..click & see

A stress fracture .>....(click & see)...is a hairline crack ->. (click & see).….in the bone that develops because of repeated or prolonged forces against the bone.

A bone fracture (sometimes abbreviated FRX or Fx or Fx) is a medical condition in which a bone is cracked or broken. It is a break in the continuity of the bone. While many fractures are the result of high force impact or stress, bone fracture can also occur as a result of certain medical conditions that weaken the bones, such as osteoporosis, certain types of cancer or osteogenesis imperfecta. Although fractures are commonly referred to as bone breaks, the word break is not part of formal orthopaedic terminology.

Fractures, broken bones–you can call it what you wish, it means the same thing–are among the most common orthopedic problems, about 6.8 million come to medical attention each year in the United States. The average citizen in a developed country can expect to sustain two fractures over the course of their lifetime.

Fractures happen because an area of bone is not able to support the energy placed on it (quite obvious, but it becomes more complicated). Therefore, there are two critical factors in determining why a fracture occurs:

*the energy of the event

*the strength of the bone

The energy can being acute, high-energy (e.g. car crash), or chronic, low-energy (e.g. stress fracture). The bone strength can either be normal or decreased (e.g. osteoporosis). A very simple problem, the broken bone, just became a whole lot more complicated!

Different Types of Fractures:-
A doctor may be able to tell whether a bone is broken simply by looking at the injured area. But the doctor will order an X-ray to confirm the fracture and determine what type it is.

Reassure your child that, with a little patience and cooperation, getting an X-ray to look at the broken bone won’t take long. Then, he or she will be well on the way to getting a cool — maybe even colorful — cast that every friend can sign.

For little ones who may be scared about getting an X-ray, it might help to explain the process like this: “X-rays don’t hurt.

……....CLICK & SEE

Doctors use a special machine to take a picture to look at the inside of your body. When the picture comes out, it won’t look like the ones in your photo album, but doctors know how to look at these pictures to see things like broken bones.”However, a fracture through the growing part of a child’s bone (called the growth plate) may not show up on X-ray. If this type of fracture is suspected, the doctor will treat it even if the X-ray doesn’t show a break.

You may click to see the different pictures of broken bones

Children’s bones are more likely to bend than break completely because they’re softer. Fracture types that are more common in kids include:

*buckle or torus fracture: one side of the bone bends, raising a little buckle, without breaking the other side

*greenstick fracture: a partial fracture in which one side of the bone is broken and the other side bends (this fracture resembles what would happen if you tried to break a green stick)

Mature bones are more likely to break completely. A stronger force will also result in a complete fracture of younger bones.

A complete fracture may be a:

*closed fracture: a fracture that doesn’t break the skin

*open (or compound) fracture: a fracture in which the ends of the broken bone break through the skin (these have an increased risk of infection)

*non-displaced fracture: a fracture in which the pieces on either side of the break line up

*displaced fracture: a fracture in which the pieces on either side of the break are out of line (which might require surgery to make sure the bones are properly aligned before casting)

Other common fracture terms include:

*hairline fracture: a thin break in the bone
*single fracture: the bone is broken in one place
*segmental: the bone is broken in two or more places in the same bone
*comminuted fracture: the bone is broken into more than two pieces or crushed

CAUSES:-
The following are common causes of broken bones:

*Fall from a height

*Motor vehicle accidents

*Direct blow

*Child abuse

*Repetitive forces, such as those caused by running, can cause stress fractures of the foot, ankle, tibia, or hip

In children:-
In children, whose bones are still developing, there are risks of either a growth plate injury or a greenstick fracture.

*A greenstick fracture occurs because the bone is not as brittle as it would be in an adult, and thus does not completely fracture, but rather exhibits bowing without complete disruption of the bone’s cortex.

*Growth plate injuries, as in Salter-Harris fractures, require careful treatment and accurate reduction to make sure that the bone continues to grow normally.

*Plastic deformation of the bone, in which the bone permanently bends but does not break, is also possible in children. These injuries may require an osteotomy (bone cut) to realign the bone if it is fixed and cannot be realigned by closed methods.

SYMPTOMS:

*A visibly out-of-place or misshapen limb or joint

*Swelling, bruising, or bleeding

*Intense pain

*Numbness and tingling

*Broken skin with bone protruding

*Limited mobility or inability to move a limb

TREATMENT:-
FIRST AID :

*Check the person’s airway and breathing. If necessary, call 911 and begin rescue breathing, CPR, or bleeding control.Keep the person still and calm.

*Examine the person closely for other injuries.

*In most cases, if medical help responds quickly, allow the medical personnel to take further action.

*If the skin is broken, it should be treated immediately to prevent infection. Don’t breathe on the wound or probe it. If possible, lightly rinse the wound to remove visible dirt or other contamination, but do not vigorously scrub or flush the wound. Cover with sterile dressings.

*If needed, immobilize the broken bone with a splint or sling. Possible splints include a rolled up newspaper or strips of wood. Immobilize the area both above and below the injured bone.

*Apply ice packs to reduce pain and swelling.

*Take steps to prevent shock. Lay the person flat, elevate the feet about 12 inches above the head, and cover the person with a coat or blanket. However, DO NOT move the person if a head, neck, or back injury is suspected.

CHECK BLOOD CIRCULATION:-
Check the person’s blood circulation. Press firmly over the skin beyond the fracture site. (For example, if the fracture is in the leg, press on the foot). It should first blanch white and then “pink up” in about two seconds. Other signs that circulation is inadequate include pale or blue skin, numbness or tingling, and loss of pulse. If circulation is poor and trained personnel are NOT quickly available, try to realign the limb into a normal resting position. This will reduce swelling, pain, and damage to the tissues from lack of blood.

TREAT BLEEDING:-
*Place a dry, clean cloth over the wound to dress it.

*If the bleeding continues, apply direct pressure to the site of bleeding. DO NOT apply a tourniquet to the extremity to stop

the bleeding unless it is life-threatening.

DO NOT:-
*DO NOT move the person unless the broken bone is stable.

*DO NOT move a person with an injured hip, pelvis, or upper leg unless it is absolutely necessary. If you must move the

person, pull the person to safety by his clothes (such as by the shoulders of a shirt, a belt, or pant-legs).

*DO NOT move a person who has a possible spine injury.

*DO NOT attempt to straighten a bone or change its position unless blood circulation appears hampered.

*DO NOT try to reposition a suspected spine injury.

*DO NOT test a bone’s ability to move.

Call immediately for emergency medical assistance if:
Call 911 if:

*There is a suspected broken bone in the head, neck, or back.

*There is a suspected broken bone in the hip, pelvis, or upper leg.

*You cannot completely immobilize the injury at the scene by yourself.

*There is severe bleeding.

*An area below the injured joint is pale, cold, clammy, or blue.

*There is a bone projecting through the skin.

Even though other broken bones may not be medical emergencies, they still deserve medical attention. Call your health care  provider to find out where and when to be seen.

If a young child refuses to put weight on an arm or leg after an accident, won’t move the arm or leg, or you can clearly see a deformity, assume the child has a broken bone and get medical help.

First aid for fractures includes stabilizing the break with a splint in order to prevent movement of the injured part, which could sever blood vessels and cause further tissue damage. Waxed cardboard splints are inexpensive, lightweight, waterproof and strong. Compound fractures are treated as open wounds in addition to fractures.

At the hospital, closed fractures are diagnosed by taking an X-ray photograph of the injury.

Since bone healing is a natural process which will most often occur, fracture treatment aims to ensure the best possible function of the injured part after healing. Bone fractures are typically treated by restoring the fractured pieces of bone to their natural positions (if necessary), and maintaining those positions while the bone heals. To put them back into the natural positions, the doctor often “snaps” the bones back into place. This process is extremely painful without anesthesia, about as painful as breaking the bone itself. To this end, a fractured limb is usually immobilized with a plaster or fiberglass cast which holds the bones in position and immobilizes the joints above and below the fracture. If being treated with surgery, surgical nails, screws, plates and wires are used to hold the fractured bone together more directly. Alternatively, fractured bones may be treated by the Ilizarov method which is a form of external fixator.

Occasionally smaller bones, such as toes, may be treated without the cast, by buddy wrapping them, which serves a similar function to making a cast. By allowing only limited movement, fixation helps preserve anatomical alignment while enabling callus formation, towards the target of achieving union.

Surgical methods of treating fractures have their own risks and benefits, but usually surgery is done only if conservative treatment has failed or is very likely to fail. With some fractures such as hip fractures (usually caused by osteoporosis or Osteogenesis Imperfecta), surgery is offered routinely, because the complications of non-operative treatment include deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism, which are more dangerous than surgery. When a joint surface is damaged by a fracture, surgery is also commonly recommended to make an accurate anatomical reduction and restore the smoothness of the joint. Infection is especially dangerous in bones, due to their limited blood flow. Bone tissue is predominantly extracellular matrix, rather than living cells, and the few blood vessels needed to support this low metabolism are only able to bring a limited number of immune cells to an injury to fight infection. For this reason, open fractures and osteotomies call for very careful antiseptic procedures and prophylactic antibiotics.
Sometimes bones are reinforced with metal, but these fracture implants must be designed and installed with care. Stress shielding occurs when plates or screws carry too large of a portion of the bone’s load, causing atrophy. This problem is reduced, but not eliminated, by the use of low-modulus materials, including titanium and its alloys. The heat generated by the friction of installing hardware can easily accumulate and damage bone tissue, reducing the strength of the connections. If dissimilar metals are installed in contact with one another (i.e., a titanium plate with cobalt-chromium alloy or stainless steel screws), galvanic corrosion will result. The metal ions produced can damage the bone locally and may cause systemic effects as well.

Herbal Treatment For Bone Broken for quicker bone groth & healing:-

By eating garlic buds, frying it in ghee joins the broken bone and releives the fracture pain. Eat Agar Agar – sea weed boiled with water. Eat the powder of Vajiram – Pirandai.

Prevention:
*Wear protective gear while skiing, biking, roller blading, and participating in contact sports. This includes helmets, elbow pads, knee pads, and shin pads.

*Create a safe home for young children. Gate stairways and keep windows closed.

*Teach children how to be safe and look out for themselves.

*Supervise children carefully. There is no substitute for supervision, no matter how safe the environment or situation appears to be.

*Prevent falls by not standing on chairs, counter tops, or other unstable objects. Remove throw rugs and electrical cords from floor surfaces. Use handrails on staircases and non-skid mats in bathtubs. These steps are especially important for the elderly.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bone_fracture
http://www.herbalking.in/diseases_b.htm#bonebroken
http://orthopedics.about.com/cs/otherfractures/a/fracture.htm
http://kidshealth.org/parent/general/aches/broken_bones.html

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Osteoarthritis (OA)

Alternative Names : Hypertrophic osteoarthritis; Osteoarthrosis; Degenerative joint disease; DJD; OA; Arthritis – osteoarthritis.

Definition : Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disorder.
Osteoarthritis (previously called degenerative arthritis, degenerative joint disease) is a chronic disorder of joint cartilage and surrounding tissues that is characterized by pain, stiffness, and loss of function.

CLICK  & SEE THE PICTURES

Osteoarthritis also occurs in almost all animals with a backbone—including fish, amphibians, and birds. Because the disorder is so widespread in the animal kingdom, some authorities believe that osteoarthritis may have evolved from an ancient method of cartilage repair.

Many myths about osteoarthritis persist—for example, that it is an inevitable part of aging, like gray hair and skin changes; that it results in little disability; and that treatment is not effective. Although osteoarthritis is more common in older people, it is not caused simply by the wear and tear that occurs with years of use. Instead, microscopic changes in the structure and composition of cartilage appear to be responsible. Most people who have the disorder, especially younger people, have few if any symptoms; however, some older people develop significant disabilities.
Causes:
Most of the time, the cause of OA is unknown. It is mainly related to aging, but metabolic, genetic, chemical, and mechanical factors can also lead to OA.

Normally, joints have such a low friction level that they are protected from wearing out, even after years of use. Osteoarthritis probably begins most often with an abnormality of the cells that synthesize the components of cartilage, such as collagen (a tough, fibrous protein in connective tissue) and proteoglycans (substances that provide resilience). Next, the cartilage may swell because of water retention, become soft, and then develop cracks on the surface. Tiny cavities form in the bone beneath the cartilage, weakening the bone. Bone can overgrow at the edges of the joint, producing bumps (osteophytes) that can be seen and felt. Ultimately, the smooth, slippery surface of the cartilage becomes rough and pitted, so that the joint can no longer move smoothly and absorb impact. All the components of the joint—bone, joint capsule (tissues that enclose most joints), synovial tissue (tissue lining the joint), tendons, ligaments, and cartilage—fail in various ways, thus altering the joint.

The symptoms of osteoarthritis usually appear in middle age and almost everyone has them by age 70. Before age 55, the condition occurs equally in both sexes. However, after 55 it is more common in women.

The disease causes the cushioning (cartilage) between the bone joints to wear away, leading to pain and stiffness. As the disease gets worse, the cartilage disappears and the bone rubs on bone. Bony spurs usually form around the joint.

OA can be primary or secondary.

Primary OA occurs without any type of injury or obvious cause.

Secondary OA is osteoarthritis due to another disease or condition. The most common causes of secondary OA are metabolic conditions, such as acromegaly, problems with anatomy (for example, being bow-legged), injury, or inflammatory disorders such as septic arthritis.

Some people who repetitively stress one joint or a group of joints, such as foundry workers, coal miners, and bus drivers, are particularly at risk. Much of the risk for osteoarthritis of the knee comes from occupations that involve bending of the joint. Curiously, long-distance running champions appear not to be at higher risk of developing the disorder. However, once osteoarthritis develops, this type of exercise often makes the disorder worse. Obesity may be a major factor in the development of osteoarthritis, particularly of the knee and especially in women.
Symptoms :

The symptoms of osteoarthritis include:

*Deep aching joint pain that gets worse after exercise or putting weight on it and is relieved by rest.

*Grating of the joint with motion

*Joint pain in rainy weather

*Joint swelling

*Limited movement

*Morning stiffness

Some people might not have symptoms.

Usually, symptoms develop gradually and affect only one or a few joints at first. Joints of the fingers, base of the thumbs, neck, lower back, big toes, hips, and knees are commonly affected. Pain, usually made worse by activities that involve weight bearing (such as standing), is the first symptom. In some people, the joint may be stiff after sleep or some other inactivity, but the stiffness usually subsides within 30 minutes of moving the joint.

As the condition causes more symptoms, the joint may become less movable and eventually may not be able to fully straighten or bend. The attempt of the tissues to repair may lead to new growth of cartilage, bone, and other tissue, which can enlarge the joints. The irregular cartilage surfaces cause joints to grind, grate, or crackle when they are moved. Bony growths commonly develop in the joints at the ends or middle of the fingers (called Heberden’s or Bouchard’s nodes).

Osteoarthritis
In some joints (such as the knee), the ligaments, which surround and support the joint, stretch so that the joint becomes unstable. Alternatively, the hip or knee may become stiff, losing its range of motion. Touching or moving the joint (particularly when standing, climbing stairs, or walking) can be very painful.

Osteoarthritis often affects the spine. Back pain is the most common symptom. Usually, damaged disks or joints in the spine cause only mild pain and stiffness. However, osteoarthritis in the neck or lower back can cause numbness, pain, and weakness in an arm or leg if the overgrowth of bone presses on nerves. The overgrowth of bone may be within the spinal canal, pressing on nerves before they exit the canal to go to the legs. This may cause leg pain after walking, suggesting incorrectly that the person has a reduced blood supply to the legs (intermittent claudication (see Peripheral Arterial Disease: Arteries of the Legs and Arms). Rarely, bony growths compress the esophagus, making swallowing difficult.

Osteoarthritis may be stable for many years or may progress very rapidly, but most often it progresses slowly after symptoms develop. Many people develop some degree of disability.

Diagnosis:

Exams and Tests

A physical exam can show limited range of motion, grating of a joint with motion, joint swelling, and tenderness.

An x-ray of affected joints will show loss of the joint space, and in advanced cases, wearing down of the ends of the bone and bone spurs.
The doctor makes the diagnosis based on the characteristic symptoms, physical examination, and the x-ray appearance of joints (such as bone enlargement and narrowing of the joint space). By age 40, many people have some evidence of osteoarthritis on x-rays, especially in weight-bearing joints such as the hip and knee, but only half of these people have symptoms. However, x-rays are not very useful for detecting osteoarthritis early because they do not show changes in cartilage, which is where the earliest abnormalities occur. Also, changes on the x-ray correlate poorly with symptoms. For example, an x-ray may show only a minor change while the person is having severe symptoms, or an x-ray may show numerous changes while the person is having very few, if any, symptoms.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can reveal early changes in cartilage, but it is rarely needed for the diagnosis. Also, MRI is too expensive to justify routine use. There are no blood tests for the diagnosis of osteoarthritis, although blood tests may help rule out other disorders

Treatment :
The goals of treatment are to relieve pain, maintain or improve joint movement, increase the strength of the joints, and reduce the disabling affects of the disease. The treatment depends on which joints are involved.

MEDICATIONS:

The most common medications used to treat osteoarthritis are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). They are pain relievers that reduce pain and swelling. Types include aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen.

Although NSAIDs work well, long-term use of these drugs can cause stomach problems, such as ulcers and bleeding. Manufacturers of NSAIDs include a warning label on their products that alerts users to an increased risk for cardiovascular events (heart attacks and strokes) and gastrointestinal bleeding.

Other medications used to treat OA include:

  • COX-2 inhibitors (coxibs). Coxibs block a substance called COX-2 that causes swelling. This class of drugs was first thought to work as well as other NSAIDs, but with fewer stomach problems. However, reports of heart attacks and stroke have led the FDA to re-evaluate the risks and benefits of the COX-2s. Celecoxib (Celebrex) is still available at the time of this report, but labeled with strong warnings and a recommendation that it be prescribed at the lowest possible dose for the shortest possible period of time. Ask your doctor whether the drug is right and safe for you.
  • Steroids. These medications are injected right into the joint. They can also be used to reduce inflammation and pain.
  • Supplements. Many people are helped by over-the-counter remedies such as glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate. There is some evidence that these supplements can help control pain, although they do not seem to grow new cartilage.
  • Artificial joint fluid (Synvisc, Hyalgan). These medications can be injected into the knee. They may relieve pain for up to 6 months.

LIFESTYLE CHANGES
Exercise helps maintain joint and overall movement. Ask your health care provider to recommend an appropriate home exercise routine. Water exercises, such as swimming, are especially helpful.

Applying heat and cold, protecting the joints, using self-help devices, and rest are all recommended.

Good nutrition and careful weight control are also important. If you’re overweight, losing weight will reduce the strain on the knee and ankle joints.

PHYSICAL THERAPY

Physical therapy can help improve muscle strength and the motion at stiff joints. Therapists have many techniques for treating osteoarthritis. If therapy does not make you feel better after 3-6 weeks, then it likely will not work at all.

BRACES
Splints and braces can sometimes support weakened joints. Some prevent the joint from moving; others allow some movement. You should use a brace only when your doctor or therapist recommends one. Using a brace the wrong way can cause joint damage, stiffness, and pain.

SURGERY
Severe cases of osteoarthritis might need surgery to replace or repair damaged joints. Surgical options include:

  • Total or partial replacement of the damaged joint with an artificial joint (knee arthroplasty,hip arthroplasty)
  • Arthroscopic surgery to trim torn and damaged cartilage and wash out the joint
  • Cartilage restoration to replace the damaged or missing cartilage in some younger patents with arthritis
  • Change in the alignment of a bone to relieve stress on the bone or joint (osteotomy)
  • Surgical fusion of bones, usually in the spine (arthrodesis)

Prognosis:
Your movement may become very limited. Treatment generally improves function.

Possible Complications :
Decreased ability to walk
Decreased ability to perform everyday activities, such as personal hygiene, household chores, or cooking
Adverse reactions to drugs used for treatment
Surgical complications
When to Contact a Medical Professional

Complementary or alternative therapies for osteoarthritis

.Alternative Therapies

Use of Alternative Therapy, Quality of Life, And Healthcare Spending in Chinese Patients with Osteoarthritis.
Acupuncture Therapy , methods

Call your health care provider if you have symptoms of osteoarthritis.

Prevention :
Weight loss can reduce the risk of knee osteoarthritis in overweight women.
How to Live With Osteoarthritis :

*Exercise affected joints gently (in a pool, if possible)

*Massage at and around affected joints (this measure should preferably be performed by a trained therapist)

*Apply a heating pad or a damp and warm towel to affected joints

*Maintain an appropriate weight (so as not to place extra stress on joints)

*Use special equipment as necessary (for example, cane, crutches, walker, neck collar, or elastic knee support to protect joints from overuse; a fixed seat placed in a bathtub to enable less stretching while washing)

*Wear well-supported shoes or athletic shoes


Disclaimer:
This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose

Resources:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000423.htm
http://www.merck.com/mmhe/sec05/ch066/ch066a.html

 

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Osteoporosis

X-ray showing a the proximal portion of a frac...
Image via Wikipedia

What It Is

Osteoporosis, derived from the Latin for porous bones, is a progressive condition that diminishes the mass (mineral content) of bones and weakens their structure, making them highly susceptible to fracture. Half of postmenopausal women, and up to one in eight older men, will suffer a fracture as a result of osteoporosis. No single measure is sufficient to prevent the disorder, but a combination of supplements and lifestyle changes can be effective in limiting damage.

Osteoporosis is a disease in which bones become weaker and more likely to break. And what’s worse, you may not even feel it happening.

How do your bones get weaker? Your bones are living tissue. They constantly renew themselves with cells that build bone and cells that take away bone. With osteoporosis, your bones lose density, making them weaker and more likely to fracture.

……...

To get an inside look at the effects of osteoporosis, the pictures  below is to explain the difference between healthy bones and osteoporotic (or weak) bones.

Because your bones are living tissue,they are constantly renewing themselves.However when the cells are taken away bone work faster than the cells that built bone, that can cause bone loss. And over the time,it can lead to osteoporosis.

…………………>normal_cells_image.Between healthy bones and osteoporotic bone, there is osteopenic bone (low bone mass). This occurs which bone mass is just below normal, but not quiet osteoporotic. And that means your bones are weakening and loosing mass- a condition that may eventually lead to                           osteoporosis.>.cell_image2- Osteopenia.When the normal bone is viewed under microscope, parts of it  look like a honeycomb. But if you have osteroporosis, the space inside the honeycomb become longer. That means you are loosing bone density.and you get osteoporosis->cell_image3-Osteoporosis

What Causes It

The decline in estrogen after menopause is directly related to the dramatic rise of osteoporosis in older women. This hormone assists the body in absorbing calcium and keeps the bones strong. (Older men experience osteoporosis as well; but because they have denser bones, bone loss is generally less severe.) Lack of regular weight-bearing exercise is another risk factor, as is a diet low in calcium and other nutrients necessary for optimal bone production. Your risk of osteoporosis is also higher if you’re small boned (white and Asian women tend to be small boned), underweight, or postmenopausal; if you have a family history of osteoporosis; or if you’ve taken steroids or anticonvulsants for long periods.

Symptoms

The first sign can be dramatic: a severe backache or a fracture (often of the spine, hip, or wrist.
Other classic symptoms include a gradual loss of height accompanied by the initially subtle development of a stooped posture (dowager’s hump).
Dental X rays may detect early osteoporosis by revealing bone loss in the jaw.

To get better knowledge about Osteoporosis and to learn how we can try to escape from it, we may visit these sites:

Aerobics for Your Bones
Arming Yourself Against Osteoporosis

Better Late than Never
Breaking the Bad News
Can Birth Control Pills Weaken Your Bones?

Exercise Today Keeps Osteoporosis Away
Extra A Not Acceptable

Maintain Strong Bones with Exercise

Treatment options- Latest Advances Trustworthy, Current Report
Natural Calcium Suppliment

Supplement Recommendations

Calcium
Vitamin D
Magnesium
Boron
Vitamin C
Zinc/Copper
Manganese

Click to learn more about Osteoporosis

BBC NEWS on Osteoporosis

You may click to see->
New treatment for osteoporosis :

Risedronate Reduces Hip Fracture Risk in Elderly Osteoporotic Women

Once a year osteoporosis jab reduces fractures and saves lives

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.

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