Tag Archives: Carminative

Aconitum fischeri

Botanical Name : Aconitum fischeri
Family: Ranunculaceae
Genus: Aconitum
Species: A. fischeri
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Ranunculales

Common Names: Fischer monkshood,Azure Monkshood

Habitat : Aconitum fischeri is native to E. Asia – Northern Japan, Eastern Russia. (Korea and Siberia and cultivated in gardens in temperate zones for its showy flowers.) It grows in riverside forests on alluvium, often in large groups, clearings, occasionally in birch and alder forests and very rarely on herb covered slopes in Kamtschatka.
Description:
Aconitum fischeri is a perennial plant, growing 61 to 66 cm (24 to 26 in) spreads 61 to 76cm (24 to 30 in). It produces upright spikes of lavender blue flowers in September. This species has particularly strong stems that do not require staking. The deeply divided dark green foliage is very attractive. Plants bloom early-late summer. This plant works well in perennial borders and cottage and woodland gardens and provides colour late in the season. It is pollinated by Bees.Colour of flowers are lavender blue. The plant is deer & rabbit registant.

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Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and can grow in heavy clay soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

Cultivation:
Thrives in most soils and in the light shade of trees. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Prefers a moist soil in sun or semi-shade. Prefers a calcareous soil. Grows well in open woodlands. Members of this genus seem to be immune to the predations of rabbits and deer. A greedy plant, inhibiting the growth of nearby species, especially legumes. Cultivated in China as a medicinal plant, it has been said to have been rendered much less toxic through this cultivation.

Propagation:
Seed – best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. The seed can be stratified and sown in spring but will then be slow to germinate. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in a cold frame for their first winter. Plant them out in late spring or early summer. Division – best done in spring but it can also be done in autumn. Another report says that division is best carried out in the autumn or late winter because the plants come into growth very early in the year.

Medicinal Uses:
The dried root is alterative, anaesthetic, antiarthritic, deobstruent, diaphoretic, diuretic, sedative, stimulant. It should be harvested in the autumn as soon as the plant has died down. This is a very poisonous plant and should only be used with extreme caution and under the supervision of a qualified practitioner.

Known Hazards: All parts of Aconitum are poisonous. Always wear gloves when working with this plant as simple skin contact has caused numbness in some people.
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aconitum_fischeri
http://www.whitehouseperennials.com/catalogue/perennials/item/aconitum-fischeri
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Aconitum+fischeri

Teucrium chamaedrys

Botanical Name : Teucrium chamaedrys
Family: Lamiaceae
Genus: Teucrium
Species: T. chamaedrys
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Lamiales
Synonyms:  Teucrium officinale – Lam.

Common Name :Wall germander

Habitat : Teucrium chamaedrys is native to Europe and the Near East. It grows in Sunny, rather dry places on waste ground and rocky outcrops, mainly on limestone soils Naturalized on old walls in Britain

Description:
Teucrium chamaedrys is a creeping evergreen perennial 6 to 18 inches tall. Its scalloped, opposite leaves are half   inch  to one & half inches  long, dark green, and shiny. In late summer, tubular flowers grow in whorls from the leaf axils

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It is hardy to zone 5 and is not frost tender. It is in leaf all year, in flower from July to September, and the seeds ripen from August to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees. The plant is self-fertile. It is noted for attracting wildlife.

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very alkaline soil. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It requires dry or moist soil.

Cultivation :
Succeeds in any moderately good soil in sun or light shade. Prefers a dry calcareous soil and a sunny position. A very hardy plant, tolerating temperatures down to at least -29°c. Wall germander was at one time widely cultivated as a medicinal plant, though it is seldom use at present. It is a very ornamental plant, making a good edging for the border and able to be lightly clipped. The fresh leaves are bitter and pungent to the taste, when rubbed they emit a strong odour somewhat resembling garlic. This species is often confused in gardens with T. divaricatum and T. x lucidrys. It is important to ensure that you have the correct plant if using it medicinally. Cut off dead flower spikes when the plant has finished flowering in order to encourage bushy new growth. A good bee plant. Plants in this genus are notably resistant to honey fungus.

Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame and only just cover the seed. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and plant them out in the summer if they are large enough. Otherwise, grow them on in a cold frame for the winter and plant them out in the following spring. Division in early spring. Larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. We have found that it is best to pot up smaller divisions and grow them on in light shade in a greenhouse or cold frame until they are growing away well. Plant them out in the summer or the following spring. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in a frame

Edible Uses:
The plant is widely used in making alcoholic drinks with a bitter base, which have digestive or appetite-promoting qualities

Medicinal Uses:
Antiinflammatory; Antirheumatic; Aperient; Aromatic; Astringent; Bitter; Carminative; Diaphoretic; Digestive; Diuretic; Stimulant; Tonic.

Wall germander is a specific for the treatment of gout, it is also used for its diuretic properties, and as a treatment for weak stomachs and lack of appetite. It has also been taken as an aid to weight loss and is a common ingredient in tonic wines. Some caution is advised when using this plant internally, it can cause liver damage The whole herb is anti-inflammatory, antirheumatic, aperient, aromatic, astringent, bitter, carminative, diaphoretic, digestive, diuretic, stimulant and tonic. It is harvested in the summer and can be dried for later use. It is used externally as an astringent infusion on the gums and also in the treatment of wounds.

Other Uses
Essential; Ground cover; Hedge.

Amenable to light trimming so can be grown as a low edging border in the garden. Any trimming is best done in the spring. The plant contains 0.6% of an essential oil. Plants can be grown as a ground cover when planted about 30cm apart each way

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teucrium_chamaedrys
http://digedibles.com/database/plants.php?Teucrium+chamaedrys

http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Teucrium+chamaedrys

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Angelica pubescens

 

Botanical Name : Angelica pubescens
Family : Apiaceae or Umbelliferae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Apiales
Genus: Angelica
Species: A. pubescens

Common Names:
Japanese common name is Shishiudo and the Chinese common name is  Du huo

Habitat : Native to E. Asia – Japan  & China.  It  grows in damp habitats in hills and low mountains, C. and S. Japan.

Description:
Angelica pubescens is  herbaceous perennial plant growing to 1–2 m tall with tripinnate leaves up to 1 m long, the leaflets being 5–10 cm long. The flowers are white, produced in large umbels.

The young stems and leaves are edible. Shishiudo is often mistaken with udo. The plant is used in traditional Chinese medicine. It is hardy to zone 7 and is not frost tender. It is in flower from Jul to August. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.The plant is self-fertile.

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The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires moist soil.

Cultivation:  
Requires a deep moist fertile soil in dappled shade or full sun. Plants are reliably perennial if they are prevented from setting seed. A polymorphic species.

Propagation  :
Seed – best sown in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe since the seed only has a short viability. Seed can also be sown in the spring, though germination rates will be lower. It requires light for germination. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in a cold frame for their first winter, planting them out into their permanent positions in the spring. The seed can also be sow in situ as soon as it is ripe.

Edible Uses: Leaves are cooked and eaten.

Medicinal Uses :
Anodyne;  AntiinflammatoryAntirheumaticCarminativeEmmenagogue;  Nervine;  Vasodilator.

The roots and rhizomes are anodyne, anti-inflammatory, antirheumatic, carminative, nervine and vasodilator. A decoction is used to promote menstruation, to treat rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatism, headache, toothache and abscesses. This herb is used medicinally in the same ways as A. dahurica (Bai Zhi). These uses are as follows:- Bai Zhi has been used for thousands of years in Chinese herbal medicine where it is used as a sweat-inducing herb to counter harmful external influences. Bai Zhi is contraindicated for pregnant women. The root is analgesic, anodyne, antibacterial, antidote, carminative, diaphoretic, diuretic, poultice and stimulant. It is used in the treatment of frontal headache, rhinitis, boils, carbuncles and skin diseases. It appears to be of value in treating the facial pain of trigeminal neuralgia. Small quantities of angelicotoxin, one of the active ingredients in the root, have an excitatory effect on the respiratory centre, central nervous system and vasculomotor centre. It increases the rate of respiration, increases blood pressure, decreases the pulse, increases the secretion of saliva and induces vomiting. In large doses it can cause convulsions and generalized paralysis.

The roots and rhizomes are used to treat nose bleed, blood in urine, rheumatic arthritis, lumbago, common cold, headache; increase menstrual flow.  A decoction is used to promote menstruation, to treat rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatism, headache, toothache and abscesses

Known Hazards:  All members of this genus contain furocoumarins, which increase skin sensitivity to sunlight and may cause dermatitis.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
http://www.botanic.jp/plants-sa/sisiud.htm
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_DE.htm
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Angelica+pubescens
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angelica_pubescens

 

Cnidium

Botanical Name ; Cnidium monnieri
Family  : Apiaceae or Umbelliferae
Genus:    Cnidium
Species:C. monnieri
Kingdom:Plantae
Order:    Apiale

Common Name : Cnidium

Habitat :Cnidium  is native to   E. Asia – China, Korea, Mongolia, Russia. Previously naturalized in the warmer areas of Europe . Grows in field edges and the sides of ditches in China. Riparian meadows and field margins in most of China.

Description:
Cnidium monnieri is a perennial plant  growing to 0.5 m (1ft 8in). It is in flower from May to July, and the seeds ripen from Jul to August.cnidium is round, dark yellow in color, and has a pleasant aroma….

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The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.The plant is self-fertile.

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires moist soil.

Cultivation: 
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in many parts of this country. Judging by the plants native habitat it is likely to require a well-drained soil in a sunny position. One report says that it is an annual whilst another says that it is perennial.

Propagation:
Seed – we have no details for this species but suggest sowing it as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. Alternatively, sow stored seed in late winter in a cold frame. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer

Edible Uses   :
Edible Parts: Leaves.
Edible Uses: Condiment.

The leaves are used as a condiment. Young shoots. No further details are given, but some caution is suggested because of a report of slight toxicity.

Medicinal Uses:
Antipruritic;  Antirheumatic;  Aphrodisiac;  AstringentCarminative;  Sedative;  Vermifuge;  Vulnerary.

She Chuang Zi has been used for thousands of years in Chinese herbal medicine. It is mainly used externally as a lotion, powder or ointment for skin conditions such as eczema, ringworm and scabies. The seed is antipruritic, aphrodisiac, antirheumatic, astringent, carminative, discutient, sedative, vermifuge and vulnerary. A decoction is used internally in the treatment of Trichomonas vaginitis, leucorrhoea and uterine displacement. The seed is also used in the treatment of impotence, often in conjunction with Schisandra chinensis. It has been shown to have an action similar to the sex hormones, prolonging and reviving the copulation period, increasing the weight of the uterus and ovary, prostate gland and testicle. A decoction of the seed or whole plant is applied externally to skin problems including weeping eczema.

Safety: American Herbal Products Association has given cnidium a class I rating, meaning that it is safe when taken in appropriate levels. However, cnidium seeds should not be used for hot or sore skin that is excessively dry. They should not also be taken at the same time patients are taking peony root, croton seed or fritillaria.

Supporting Research: Cnidium has been very commonly used in formulations designed to warm the Kidneys and strengthen Yang energy. It is primarily used for the purpose of overcoming sexual malaise and strengthening sexual potency

Known Hazards :  One report says that the plant is slightly toxic.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Cnidium+monnieri
http://www.herbpalace.com/herbs/cnidium-seed.html
http://saludbio.com/imagen/cnidium-monnieri

http://www.botanic-art.com/seeds-cnidium-monnieri-chuang-gram-p-340.html

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Aralia chinensis

Botanical Name : Aralia chinensis
Family: Araliaceae
Genus: Aralia
Species: A. chinensis
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Apiales

Synonyms: Aralia sinensis Hort,A. elata.

Common Names :Chinese Angelica Tree, Pumila Spirea, Chinese Astilbe

Habitat :   Aralia chinensis is native to E. Asia – China. (China, Vietnam, and Malaysia.)  It grows in forests on rich well moistened soil.

Description:
Aralia chinensis is a deciduous Shrub growing to 3.5 m (11ft 6in).It is somewhat prickly and hairy ornamental type,  having leathery twice-pinnate leaves, and panicles of creamy-white flowers, succeeded by black berries. The variegated form with an irregular silvery bordering to the leaflets is particularly handsome

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It is frost tender. It is in flower from Aug to September, and the seeds ripen in October. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees.

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in full shade (deep woodland) or semi-shade (light woodland).It requires moist soil.

Cultivation:   
Prefers a good deep loam and a semi-shady position. Requires a sheltered position. Plants are hardier when grown in poorer soils. The young growth in spring, even on mature plants, is frost-tender and so it is best to grow the plants in a position sheltered from the early morning sun. This species is closely allied to A. elata. A very ornamental plant.

Propagation  :   
Seed – best sown as soon as ripe in a cold frame. Stored seed requires 3 – 5 months of cold stratification. Germination usually takes place within 1 – 4 months at 20°c. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in light shade in a greenhouse for at least their first winter. Once the plants are 25cm or more tall, they can be planted out into their permanent positions, late spring or early summer being the best time to do this. Root cuttings 8cm long, December in a cold frame. Store the roots upside down in sand and pot up in March/April. High percentage. Division of suckers in late winter. Very easy, the suckers can be planted out direct into their permanent positions if required.

Edible Uses:       
Edible Parts: Leaves.

Young shoots – cooked. Used as a vegetable. Blanched and used in salads. Although no records of edibility have been seen for the seed, it is said to contain 5.8 – 17.5% protein, 4.2 – 46.3% fat and 3.7 – 5.7% ash.

Medicinal Uses:

Anodyne;  CarminativeDiuretic;  Sialagogue.

The stem and root are anodyne and carminative. It is used as a warming painkilling herb in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The root is also considered to be useful in the treatment of diabetes and dysmenorrhoea. Some caution is advised since the bark is considered to be slightly poisonous. The stembark is diuretic and sialagogue.The plant also relieves flatulence.  It regulates body moisture and  promotes the health of the circulatory and respiratory systems.  The roots and stems are used in decoctions.  Single dose: 31-62g.  Studies in vitro showed that the water extract of herb had cytotoxical effect on esophageal cell line and tests in vivo indicated that it was effective against SAK, HepS, EAC, s180, and U14 murine tumors.

Other Uses:Birds & Wildlife; Deer Resistant; Wind-Breaks; Likes Shade;

Known Hazards :  The bark is considered to be slightly poisonous

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aralia_chinensis
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Aralia+chinensis
http://toptropicals.com/pics/garden/m1/bel/Aralia_chinensis409.jpg
http://www.forestfarm.com/product.php?id=529
http://chestofbooks.com/gardening-horticulture/Commercial-Gardening-4/Aralia-Chinensis-Dimorphanthus-Mandschuricus.html

http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_C.htm

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