Categories
Ailmemts & Remedies

Pelvic pain

Definition:
Pelvic pain is pain in the lowest part of your abdomen and pelvis. In women, pelvic pain may refer to symptoms arising from the reproductive or urinary systems or from musculoskeletal sources. Pelvic pain can occur suddenly, sharply and briefly (acute) or over the long term (chronic). Chronic pelvic pain refers to any constant or intermittent pelvic pain that has been present for more than a few months. It can affect both women and men.

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Depending on its source, pelvic pain may be dull or sharp; it may be constant or off and on (intermittent); and it may be mild, moderate or severe. Pelvic pain can sometimes radiate to one’s lower back, buttocks or thighs.

Common causes in include: endometriosis in women, bowel adhesions, irritable bowel syndrome, and interstitial cystitis. The cause may also be a number of poorly understood conditions that may represent abnormal psychoneuromuscular function.

Most women, at some time in their lives, experience pelvic pain. As girls enter puberty, pelvic or abdominal pain becomes a frequent complaint.
Sometimes, it is noticed that pelvic pains only at certain times, such as when  urinating  or during sexual activity.

According to the CDC, Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) accounted for approximately 9% of all visits to gynecologists in 2007. In addition, CPP is the reason for 20—30% of all laparoscopies in adults.

Causes:
Several types of diseases and conditions may cause pelvic pain. Often chronic pelvic pain results from more than one condition.

Pelvic pain may arise from one’s digestive, reproductive or urinary system. Recently, doctors have recognized that some pelvic pain, particularly chronic pelvic pain, may also arise from muscles and connective tissue (ligaments) in the structures of the pelvic floor. Occasionally, pelvic pain may be caused by irritation of nerves in the pelvis.

The different conditions that may cause pelvic pain includs:

*exaggerated bladder, bowel, or uterine pain sensitivity (also known as visceral pain)
pelvic girdle pain (SPD or DSP)

Gynecologic:

*Dysmenorrhea—pain during the menstrual period

*Endometriosis—pain caused by uterine tissue that is outside the uterus. Endometriosis can be visually confirmed by laparoscopy in approximately 75% of adolescent girls with chronic pelvic pain that is resistant to treatment, and in approximately 50% of adolescent in girls with chronic pelvic pain that is not necessarily resistant to treatment.

*Müllerian abnormalities

*Pelvic inflammatory disease—pain caused by damage from infections

*Ovarian cysts—the ovary produces a large, painful cyst, which may rupture

*Ovarian torsion—the ovary is twisted in a way that interferes with its blood supply

*Ectopic pregnancy—a pregnancy implanted outside the uterus

Abdominal:

*Loin pain hematuria syndrome

*Proctitis—infection or inflammation of the anus or rectum

*Colitis—infection or inflammation of the colon

*Appendicitis—infection or inflammation of the bowel

Internal hernias are difficult to identify in women, and misdiagnosis with endometriosis or idiopathic chronic pelvic pain is very common. One cause of misdiagnosis that when the woman lies down flat on an examination table, all of the medical signs of the hernia disappear. The hernia can typically only be detected when symptoms are present, so diagnosis requires positioning the woman’s body in a way that provokes symptoms.

Female reproductive system:
Pelvic pain arising from the female reproductive system may be caused by conditions such as:

*Adenomyosis
*Endometriosis
*Menstrual cramps (dysmenorrhea)
*Ectopic pregnancy (or other pregnancy-related conditions)
*Miscarriage (before the 20th week) or intrauterine fetal death
*Mittelschmerz (ovulation pain)
*Ovarian cancer
*Ovarian cysts
*Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)
*Uterine fibroids
*Vulvodynia

Other causes in women or men:
Examples of other possible causes of pelvic pain — in women or men — include:

*Colon cancer
*Chronic constipation
*Crohn’s disease
*Diverticulitis
*Fibromyalgia
*Interstitial cystitis (also called painful bladder syndrome)
*Intestinal obstruction
*Irritable bowel syndrome
*Kidney stones
*Past physical or sexual abuse
*Pelvic floor muscle spasms
*Prostatitis
*Ulcerative colitis
*Urinary tract infection (UTI)

Diagnosis:
The diagnostic workup begins with a careful history and examination, followed by a pregnancy test. Some women may also need bloodwork or additional imaging studies, and a handful may also benefit from having surgical evaluation.

The absence of visible pathology in chronic pain syndromes should not form the basis for either seeking psychological explanations or questioning the reality of the patient’s pain. Instead it is essential to approach the complexity of chronic pain from a psychophysiological perspective which recognises the importance of the mind-body interaction. Some of the mechanisms by which the limbic system impacts on pain, and in particular myofascial pain, have been clarified by research findings in neurology and psychophysiology.

Differential diagnosis:
In men, chronic pelvic pain (category IIIB) is often misdiagnosed as chronic bacterial prostatitis and needlessly treated with antibiotics exposing the patient to inappropriate antibiotic use and unnecessarily to adverse effects with little if any benefit in most cases. Within a Bulgarian study, where by definition all patients had negative microbiological results, a 65% adverse drug reaction rate was found for patients treated with ciprofloxacin in comparison to a 9% rate for the placebo patients. This was combined with a higher cure rate (69% v 53%) found within the placebo group.

Treatment:
Many women will benefit from a consultation with a physical therapist, a trial of anti-inflammatory medications, hormonal therapy, or even neurological agents.

A hysterectomy is sometimes performed.

Spinal cord stimulation has been explored as a potential treatment option for some time, however there remains to be consensus on where the optimal location of the spinal cord this treatment should be aimed. As the innervation of the pelvic region is from the sacral nerve roots, previous treatments have been aimed at this region; results have been mixed. Spinal cord stimulation aimed at the mid- to high-thoracic region of the spinal cord have produced some positive results.

The sensation of pain travels through nerves up the spinal cord to the brain. Mild antidepressants like amitriptyline and gabapentin can block these transmissions and relieve the pain. They are especially effective if combined with anti-inflammatory medications like ibuprofen.

IBS and food allergies should also be tackled. Sometimes avoiding milk or wheat or both, and tackling abnormal gut motility works.

Physical activity reduces pain to an extent. Walking, jogging or running for 40 minutes a day is important. This should be combined with stretching and pelvic exercises. And if there is stress, cut it down with yoga and meditation.

Kegel exercise  or pelvic floor exercise   is most effective for Pelvic pain

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Click to see :.—>..Homeopathic Treatment for Pelvic Pain

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The treatment of pelvic pain with acupuncture

Pelvic Pain Recovery: Getting Your Life Back with Yoga  :

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pelvic_pain
http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/pelvic-pain/basics/definition/sym-20050898
http://www.telegraphindia.com/1141103/jsp/knowhow/story_18992189.jsp#.VFmWH2d2E1I

Categories
Suppliments our body needs

Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM)

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Other names: methyl sulfonyl methane or dimethylsulfone (DMSO2)

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Definition:
MSM (methyl sulfonyl methane) is a compound found naturally in foods such as cow’s milk, meat, seafood, fruits and vegetables.It is an odorless breakdown product of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Its principal advocates have been Robert M. Herschler, Ph.D., and Stanley W. Jacob, M.D., of Oregon Health Sciences University. Herschler, who is a research biochemist, holds eleven patents for MSM awarded between 1981 and 1996. Jacob, a longtime advocate of using DMSO for treating arthritis, holds one patent (awarded in 1996) and has co-authored a book called The Miracle of MSM .

Herschler’s claims for MSM are not modest. The background information section of a 1985 patent, for example, states:

MSM is an ameliorating agent for a variety of pathological conditions when administered systemically and preferably orally to persons displaying symptoms of physiological response to stress, e.g., gastrointestinal distress, inflammation of the mucous membranes and allergic reactions.

In particular, it is found found that when those stress response symptoms include gastrointestinal upset, e.g., diarrhea, constipation, nausea, hyperacidity and/or epigastric pain, or inflammation of the mucous membrane, especially of the gastrointestinal and/or respiratory tract, dramatic relief from those symptoms can be achieved by the oral ingestion of MSM.

It is also found that the oral ingestion of MSM can be beneficial in treating a variety of other conditions that one would not expect to be responsive to MSM.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a method for the amelioration of physiological symptoms of stress employing MSM.

Another object is the provision of pharmaceutical compositions comprising a stress-inducing physiologically acceptable pharmaceutically active agent and a stress-relieving amount of MSM.

Other objects will be apparent to those skilled in the art to which this invention pertains.

MSM is thought to work by contributing sulfur. It’s found in capsule or tablet forms. MSM is also available as a cream or lotion, although evidence suggests it can’t be absorbed through skin.

Why Do People Use MSM?

*Osteoarthritis
Two small studies suggest MSM may reduce osteoarthritis pain. MSM is often combined with glucosamine in commercial arthritis products. It’s thought to work because of the sulfur, which is believed to strengthen collagen. More evidence is needed.

*Interstitial cystitis
MSM has been proposed as a treatment for interstitial cystitis, although human studies are needed.

*Snoring
One small, preliminary study found that MSM resulted in quieter snoring.

*Other Conditions
MSM has been explored for cancer prevention, scleroderma, allergies and constipation.

Side Effects and Safety
Side effects with MSM are rare but may include stomach upset, headache and diarrhea. One study suggested MSM was safe for up to 12 weeks.

The safety of MSM in pregnant or nursining women, children, or people with liver or kidney disease, however, isn’t known.

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Resources:
http://altmedicine.about.com/cs/herbsvitaminsad/a/MSM.htm
http://www.quackwatch.com/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/DSH/msm.html

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Categories
Ailmemts & Remedies

Interstitial Cystitis (IC)

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Alternative Names: Cystitis – interstitial; IC

Definition: Interstitial cystitis is chronic (long-term) inflammation of the bladder wall.Interstitial Cystitis (IC) is one of many urinary diseases. Cystitis is an inflammation or infection of the urinary bladder. When caused by germs, it’s called a urinary tract infection (UTI). UTIs can be painful and annoying. They can also become a serious health problem if they spread to infect your kidneys. Antibacterial, diuretic, and anti-inflammatory herbs are often used to treat cystitis.

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Your urinary system is composed of your kidneys, ureters, bladder and urethra. All play a role in removing waste from your body. Your kidneys, a pair of bean-shaped organs in your upper-posterior abdomen, filter waste from your blood. Tubes called ureters carry urine from your kidneys to the bladder, where it is stored until it exits your body through the urethra. A urinary tract infection can begin when bacteria enter the urinary tract through the urethra and then begin to multiply.

Causes: Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a painful condition caused by inflammation of the tissues of the bladder wall. The cause is unknown. The condition is usually diagnosed by ruling out other conditions (such as sexually transmitted disease, bladder cancer, and bladder infections).

IC is frequently misdiagnosed as a urinary tract infection, and patients often go years without a correct diagnosis. On average, there is about a 4-year delay between the time the first symptoms occur and the diagnosis is made.

More than 700,000 Americans have IC. The condition generally occurs around age 30 to 40, although it has been reported in younger people. Women are 10 times more likely to have IC than men.

Symptoms:
Most people with bladder infections develop signs and symptoms. These may include:

*A strong, persistent urge to urinate…Urinary urgency
*A burning sensation when urinating…Pain during intercourse
*Passing frequent, small amounts of urine…Urinary frequency (up to 60 times a day in severe cases)
*Blood in the urine (hematuria)
* Passing cloudy or strong-smelling urine…..Urinary discomfort
*A feeling of pressure in the lower abdomen
*Low-grade fev

*Pelvic pain

In young children, new episodes of bed-wetting (enuresis) may also be a sign of a UTI.

Diagnosis :
Diagnosis is made by ruling out other causes. Urine analysis, urine culture, and urine cytology tests are essential.

Usually, cystoscopy (endoscopy of bladder) and bladder biopsy are performed. The characteristic finding of interstitial cystitis during cystoscopy is pinpoint bleeding in the lining of the bladder or ulcers on the bladder wall.

In IC, the bladder does not hold as much urine as a normal bladder typically does.

A procedure called video urodynamics can reveal how much urine needs to be in the bladder before the patient feels the need to urinate.

Treatment :
There is no cure for IC, nor are there any standard or consistently effective treatments. Results vary from individual to individual. As long as the cause is unknown, treatment is based on trial and error until relief is found.

The usual treatment is with antibiotics. You can take a number of steps to help prevent a bladder infection.

Elmiron is the only medication taken by mouth that is specifically approved for the treatment of IC. This medicine coats the bladder like Pepto-Bismol coats the stomach.

Other medicines may include:
*Tricyclic antidepressants such as Elavil (amitriptyline) may relieve pain and urinary frequency
*Vistaril (hydroxyzine pamoate), an antihistamine that causes sedation helps reduce urinary frequency
*Opioid painkillers for severe pain
Other therapies include:
*Instilled medications – medicines are placed directly into the bladder. Medicines that are given this way include dimethyl sulfoxide (DMS), heparin, Clorpactin, lidocaine, doxorubicin, or bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine.
*Surgery, ranging from cystoscopic manipulation to bladder removal (cystectomy)
Bladder hydrodistention (filling bladder with fluid)
*Bladder training (using relaxation techniques to train the bladder to go only at specific times)
Physical therapy and biofeedback (may help relieve pelvic floor muscle spasms)
Diet modification

Some patients find that changes in their diet can help control symptoms. The idea is to avoid foods and beverages that can cause bladder irritation. Below are some of the foods that the Interstitial Cystitis Association says may cause bladder irritation.

Aged cheeses
Sour Cream
Yogurt
Chocolate
Onions
Tofu
Soy
Fava and lima beans
Tomatoes
Most fruits except blueberries, honeydew melon, and pears
Rye bread
Sourdough bread
Meats that are cured, processed, smoked, canned, aged, or that contain nitrites
Nuts except almonds, cashews, and pine nuts
Alcohol
Citrus juices
Coffee
Tea
Cranberry juice (Note: Although cranberry juice is often recommended for urinary tract infections, it can make IC symptoms worse)
Seasonings that contain MSG
Artificial sweeteners
Experts suggest that you do not stop eating all these foods at one time. Instead, try eliminating one at a time to see if that helps relieve symptoms.

Support Groups:
For additional information and support, see interstitial cystitis support groups.

Prognosis:
Treatment results vary. Some people respond well to simple treatments and dietary changes. Others may require extensive treatments or surgery.

Possible Complications
Chronic (long-term) pain that may cause a change in lifestyle
Emotional trauma
High costs associated with frequent medical visits
Chronic depression
Side effects of treatments (depending on the treatment)
When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your health care provider if you have symptoms suggestive of interstitial cystitis. Be sure to mention that you suspect this disorder. It is not well-recognized nor is it easily diagnosed.

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Naturopathic Treatments for Interstitial Cystitis
Alternative Treatment of Interstitial Cystitis

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Prevention:
You can take steps to reduce the risk of bladder infections. Women, in particular, may benefit from the following:

Drink plenty of liquids, especially water. Cranberry juice may have infection-fighting properties. However, don’t drink cranberry juice if you’re taking the blood-thinning medication warfarin (Coumadin). Possible interactions between cranberry juice and warfarin can lead to bleeding.

Urinate frequently. Avoid retaining your urine for a long time when you feel the urge to void.

Wipe from front to back after a bowel movement. Doing so prevents bacteria in the anal region from spreading to the vagina and urethra.

Take showers rather than tub baths. If you’re susceptible to infections, doing so can help prevent infections.

Gently wash the skin around the vagina and anus.
Do this daily, but don’t use harsh soaps or wash too vigorously. The delicate skin around these areas can become irritated.

Empty your bladder as soon as possible after intercourse. Drink a full glass of water to help flush bacteria.

Avoid using deodorant sprays or feminine products such as douches in the genital area. These products can irritate the urethra.

Self-care:
UTIs can be painful, but you can take steps to ease your discomfort until antibiotics clear the infection. Sometimes a heating pad placed over your abdomen can help minimize feelings of bladder pressure or pain. Drink plenty of fluids and avoid coffee, alcohol, soft drinks with caffeine, citrus juices and spicy foods until your infection has cleared. These items can irritate your bladder and aggravate your frequent or urgent need to urinate.

Doing Pranayam daily under the guide of an expart will help a lot.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose

Resources:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000477.htm
http://www.dreddyclinic.com/findinformation/bb/cystitis.htm

Categories
Ailmemts & Remedies

Dysuria

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Definition:: Painful or difficult urination. This includes burning on urination. Dysuria is most commonly due to bacterial infection of the urinary tract causing inflammation of the bladder (cystitis) or kidney (pyelonephritis).

In women, dysuria may also reflect inflammation of the vagina (vaginitis) or vulva (vulvitis). And in men, dysuria may be due to inflammation of the prostate (prostatitis) or the urethra (urethritis) from gonorrhea or chlamydia.

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In medicine, specifically urology, dysuria refers to painful urination. This is typically described to be a burning or stinging sensation. It is most often a result of an infection of the urinary tract. It may also be due to an STD, bladder stones, bladder tumours, and virtually any condition of the prostate.

It is one of a constellation of irritative bladder symptoms, which includes frequency of urination and haematuria.

It is a common complaint in women, and almost 25% of women suffer from dysuria each year. It can also affect men, but to a lesser extent. Infection is the most common cause of dysuria.

The most common age range for this complaint is 24 to 54 years old. The infection is also thought to be contracted more easily by people who are sexually active. Genital herpes is one infection that can cause dysuria.

Signs and symptoms of dysuria:

  • Severe pain in urination
  • Incontinence urinary
  • Stinging or burning sensation during urination
  • Nocturia
  • Swelling in the bladder.
  • Urine frequency
  • Polyuria
  • Expulsion of urine from bladder

There are other symptoms that may accompany dysuria. These can include blood in the urine or vaginal discharge. There may be a hesitancy or slowness when urinating, and there may also be pain during intercourse. All of these symptoms must be taken into account and investigated before a diagnosis can be made.

Causes of dysuria:

There are many other causes of dysuria including irritation from chemicals in soaps, bubble baths, spermicides, and douches.

Diagnosis of dysuria:

Urine culture, urine analysis and urine dipstick will be recommended by health care provider to determine the disease. Sometimes, DNA probes may be suggested by the health care provider.

Ultrasonography and neurological tests may be used to detect the infection of urinart tract. Medical history related questions would be asked by health care providers. Medical history questions include:

When did you get problem during urination?

Is there any pain in thighs, urethra, or back pain?

Does pain continue or discontinue after urination?

Was there any blood in urine and drainage from vagina?

Physical activities, including horse riding and bicycle riding, may also cause the condition. There may also be some urethral damage during sexual intercourse. Certain conditions, such as depression, can also bring on dysuria.

A full medical history is required in order to diagnose the cause of dysuria. Factors taken into consideration include frequency and location of the pain. If pain is felt inside the body, then the cause may be cystitis or urethritis. If the pain occurs as urine leaves the body, then it may be a vaginal infection.

Treatment of dysuria:

Types of treatment of dysuria depend on the causes and symptoms of discomfort.

An antibiotic will be prescribed by the doctor to reduce the discomfort. Medications and antibiotics are effective treatment. They can be used in case of severe pain during urination. Sometimes surgical treatment may be used to reduce the infection of urinary tract. Urinary analgesics such as phenazopyridine may be used before completed the culture.

Phenazopyridine (oral) is an effective treatment for pain relief.

Herbs for Dysuria:- Kantakari, Purslane, Sandalwood

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HOMEOPATHIC Treatment & Medicines for URINARY TRACT INFECTION

Prevention of dysuria:

  • You should avoid tight clothes such as pent, suit.
  • You should use latex condoms during sexual activities.
  • You should wipe clearly from front to back after urination.
  • You should manage self-care strategies.
  • You should avoid intercourse.
  • You should not use douching.
  • You can drink 10-12 glasses of water regularly.
  • You should keep the genital area dry and clean with mild soap and water.
  • Do not use vaginal sprays and irritation soaps.
  • Avoid sexual contact with infected person.

There are some simple measures that can be taken to prevent dysuria. These include using condoms and avoiding intercourse until an infection has left the body. Wearing loose clothing may help, and using feminine douches may also help. If dysuria occurs, it is important to seek medical help. Early diagnosis can prevent any infection from spreading.

When to seek medical advice

If you may experience severe pain during urination, you should call your health care provider immediately. There is blood in urine and drainage form vagina and panis call your doctor as soon as possible.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose

Resources:
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-causes-dysuria.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dysuria
http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=3163
http://www.womens-health-clinic.com/DYSURIA.htm

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